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Mysteries

Unnatural Hexagon Structure Spotted on Mars

A hexagon shaped structure with a possible dome was discovered in a photograph taken by NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on 17 August 2008.

Multiple disc-shaped objects with classic features similar to the classic flying saucers we are accustomed to here on Earth were discovered, as well as other unnatural looking structures that don’t fit in the surrounding landscape.

Could this be evidence of crashed flying-saucer type craft, or perhaps of a past civilization?

Link to original image taken by NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter:
https://www.uahirise.org/PSP_009653_2275

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Mysteries

The Mystery Surrounding Abraham Lincoln’s Assassination

A great deal of mystery still surrounds the Knights of the Golden Circle (KGC). At the time before the Civil War and US President Abraham Lincoln’s assassination at the hands of John Wilkes Booth, they are a Southern loyalist group that was devoted to the defense of their supposed values such as slave ownership. However, there is much more to them than people know.

They had plans to conquer Cuba, Mexico, and Central America. The goal was to create a Confederate empire beyond what the Confederacy had accomplished. It was an ambitious goal for them, and they had many infamous members including the aforementioned Booth.

Jesse James was another well-known name. Supposedly, his robberies could have contributed to the increase of gold the KGC had. From the beginning, people have said Lincoln’s assassination may have been a KGC plot from the get-go since it was Booth who did it. This comes from the legends that have been passed on down the decades by word of mouth.

It stands to make sense that the KGC could have pulled off something like this. Headquartered in Cincinnati, Ohio and founded by George W.L. Bickley, who was an Indiana-born editor and doctor, the group started allegedly in Lexington, Kentucky by five men who came together because of Bickley’s request.

This comes from records of that KGC convention held in 1860. Bickley made his way to the east and south to push for a Mexican expedition and wanted to create a force to colonize the West Indies and Mexico.

They wanted to raise an army of 16,000 men to southernize Mexico and conquer it. The group expanded in 1859, as Confederate States Army Brigadier General Elkanah Greer started KGC castles in Louisiana and Texas.

During the spring of 1860, he became a grand commander and general of 4,000 KGC military knights in the 21 castles of the Texas division. When Lincoln was elected president, the KGC focused their support on the secession of southern states in the US from the Union. The KGC came into conflict with US Marshall Ben McCulloch, a former Texas Ranger when he began his expedition toward the San Antonio, Texas federal arsenal.

The arsenal had a force of 550 men, 150 who worked for the KGC from the six different castles there. US Army Brevet Major General David E. Twiggs chose to surrender to the cavalry force. These members also were important to the 1861 takeover of New Mexican territory by Lieutenant Colonel John Robert Baylor.

May 1861 saw the Confederate Rangers and KGC attack a building owning The Alamo Express, a pro-Union newspaper. The newspaper was owned by James Pearson Newcomb, a journalist and eventual Texas Secretary of State.

He did not have a phone transmitter at the time. Some KGC members also went with Brigadier General Henry Hopkins Sibley on the 1862 New Mexico Campaign. Word had it that Franklin Pierce, a former US president, was also a member of the KGC

The KGC began to spread into Kentucky, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, and Ohio. This is where the KGC took a different turn. In 1863, the KGC became the Order of American Knights. 1864 saw it undergo another transformation into the Order of the Sons of Liberty, led by Clement Vallandigham, an Ohio politician and their supreme commander.

They allegedly went underground after The Civil War and Lincoln’s assassination without a phone transmitter. It was reported they sought to start a second confederacy against the US Government.

American Unearthed, a History Channel show, alleged the James-Younger Gang was the source of money for a second US Civil War. While there has been no further evidence out there, it definitely fits in with what the KGC has been responsible. Their greatest act appears to be the death of Lincoln.

What became of them after is left up to speculation. They might have furthered plots to overthrow the US government while others such as National Treasure: Book of Secrets allege there is KGC/Confederate gold, buried somewhere throughout the USA.

A California couple once found gold coins that are believed to have originated from the KGC. While the group’s crimes remained in secret, it is obvious there is much more this group could have possibly done beyond the killing of one of America’s greatest historical leaders.

About author: Tommy Zimmer is a writer whose work has appeared online and in print. His work covers a variety of topics, including politics, economics, health and wellness, consumer electronics, and the entertainment industry.

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Mysteries

Loud Boom that Shook Homes in South Texas, Remains a Mystery

Neighbors from La Vernia to Karnes City reported hearing a loud boom Wednesday afternoon on social media.

While many people are speculating as to what it may have been, right now the loud boom continues to remain a mystery.

Wilson County authorities said they began getting calls into dispatch reporting the boom around 1:30 p.m. Wednesday. Sisters Bailey and Molly Runty were at home in their home in Adkins when they heard it.

“We were just sitting in the room, and then we just heard it and then I started freaking out,” Bailey said.

The girls described the boom as being so huge that it shook their house.

“I was terrified,” Bailey said.

“She jumped out of her skin,” said her sister.

The family’s home video security captured the moment when the boom startled their dog, Yogi.

“He was barking a lot and ran up to our door because he got freaked out,” Bailey said.

Other people reported their houses shaking and windows fluttering.

Taylor Gault said that, the salon where she works, the floors shook.

“It was so big, it opened our door,” she said. “I thought someone hit the door and hit the wall.”

At another salon, patrons were still talking about what they heard, speculating on what it could have been.

“I was a little alarmed, but I figured, ‘Well, okay, there’s no terrorist attack,’ why would they want to blow up La Vernia?,” said a patron who only identified herself as Karen.

Neighbors in La Vernia said there are a lot of theories about the boom, but nothing has yet been confirmed.

“The officials can’t tell you what it is, I went as far as to call the city council,” Karen said.

Wilson County Emergency Management officials said they had reports of the boom from Karnes City to New Berlin, but they didn’t have any information as to what it may have been.

Some people say it may have been a sonic boom. However, officials with Joint Base San Antonio said they weren’t responsible.

There’s also a theory that a local company may have been using explosives to test materials. KENS 5 reached out to the company, Baker Risk, and company officials said the sounds were not produced by them.

So, for now, the loud boom reported by so many people, will remain a summer mystery.

Vanessa Croix
KENS 5

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Mysteries

Source of Unexplained Boom Heard across Hamilton, Ontario Remains a Mystery

The mystery boom in the wee hours Saturday was a literally moving experience for Bryan Adlam.

“I heard the boom – it was quite loud – but I also felt it. I felt my house move,” said the real estate agent, who lives in the Crown Point neighbourhood near the escarpment.

Turns out bewildered residents across the city heard the same thing after 2 a.m. On the beach strip. The Mountain. Even Ancaster.

Adlam posted a question about the sound blast on Facebook that quickly spawned 500-plus comments, theories and, obviously, fart jokes.

But so far, the source of the thunderous bang remains a mystery.

Was it a supersonic jet? An industrial accident? A skyquake? Nobody seems to know.

The most popular online theory – a dropped container of molten steel or slag – was emphatically shot down by steelmakers Stelco and ArcelorMittal Dofasco.

“We’ve checked twice. There was nothing,” said ArcelorMittal Dofasco spokesperson Marie Verdun.

She acknowledged the oft-repeated online suggestion that workers accidentally “dropped a ladle” – think an enormous steel-plated vessel full of molten metal, ponderously carried through the air by crane.

Yes, Verdun said, that would be loud. “But if we dropped one, we would have a much bigger problem than a big noise,” she said.

It’s always possible another industrial accident was to blame, but neither police nor fire were called to an incident large enough to be heard across the city.

Similarly, no crashes, gas or transformer explosions were reported. (Film production on Ottawa Street this week could involve loud noises, but city officials were not aware of any explosive movie-making at 2 a.m. Saturday.)

It was also a quiet night for the Hamilton Port Authority and the city’s international airport. But spokesperson Tomas Cleary conceded the airport would not necessarily be informed if military jets were in the vicinity, for example.

A sonic boom that rattled the windows of Essex residents in the U.K. two days ago was recently confirmed to be the result of a Royal Air Force jet, according to the BBC.

The Canadian Department of National Defence was still checking Monday to see if military activities over Lake Ontario could have caused Hamilton’s mind-boggling boom. Stay tuned.

Neither Canadian Pacific nor Canadian National Railway were aware of any crashes or major incidents on the mainline railways or shunting yards in the city, officials told The Spectator.

We’re also “out of luck” for loud weather, said Environment Canada meteorologist Peter Kimbell, who searched all around Lake Ontario unsuccessfully for potential thunder or lightning culprits.

Earthquakes Canada showed no measurable seismic activity at nearby monitoring stations. Local seismographs can record even magnitude 1 tremors – which people typically do not feel – which suggests the boom did not originate underground.

(Interestingly, seismographs did record an “acoustic blip” during a similar wee hours mystery blast in 2005 that befuddled east end and beach strip residents. No one got to the bottom of that boom, either.)

In the meantime, residents have cheerfully filled the informational void with a range of educated-to-wild guesses, including asteroids, solar radiation storms, aliens and “God’s taco night.”

But until we hear otherwise, feel free to call Hamilton’s mystery blast a skyquake – the default label for unexplained booms out of the blue.

Matthew Van Dongen
The Hamilton Spectator

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