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Metaphysics & Psychology

These people woke up in the future. Their memory erased dozens of years of life

These people woke up in the future. Their memory erased dozens of years of life 86

Due to the rare form of amnesia, Naomi Jacobs and Kim Denikola forgot their decades of life. From their point of view, they suddenly found themselves in the future and were able to look from the outside at the changed world and at themselves many years later.

Kim did not know how she ended up in the hospital. On the eve in high school there were final exams. She remembered how she left school and headed for her car – and nothing more. Perhaps an accident has occurred? If so, then everything worked out, because she felt no pain.

The nurse noticed that the patient woke up and spoke to her. “Do you know what year it is?” she asked. The question was part of a neurological test for unconscious patients. “Yes, ma’am,” Kim replied politely. “It’s 1980 now.” The world goes crazy with a Rubik’s cube, Michael Jackson and Blondie, and in theaters, Darth Vader explains to Luke Skywalker who his father is. Kim was 18 years old, she was finishing school.

Kim Denikola with Ricky's friend in 1977 Photo: Kim Harris Denicola
Kim Denikola with Ricky’s friend in 1977 Photo: Kim Harris Denicola

The preoccupied nurse asked another standard question: “Who is the president now?” “Ronald Reagan,” Kim recalled. In November, a former actor won the Democrat election. Jimmy Carter has been at the head of the country since 1977, however, Reagan will enter into the rights only next year – after the inauguration in January. The answer did not at all have the effect that the girl was counting on.

The nurse left and returned with an unfamiliar old man. He turned to Kim as if he knew her well, although she definitely saw him for the first time. No one ever told her what happened. “I felt completely lost,” she says. – I kept waiting and waiting for when mom and dad appear. When you’re 18, it usually does. But they did not come.”

In the toilet, Kim looked in the mirror and saw herself in horror. “There wasn’t the girl I remembered, – “A 56-year-old woman was looking at me.” This was, in her words, the beginning of her “awakening.” She learned that almost 40 years have passed since school exams from her last memory. The unfamiliar old man is her husband, and they have children and even grandchildren, whom she completely does not remember. And the parents died.

Memory loss

According to the stories of relatives and friends, Kim Denikola restored the latest events before losing her memory. In October 2018, she returned from a weekly circle with her catholic church. On the street, her eyes clouded with a terrible headache. The woman called her husband. “He advised me not to drive, but to ask someone from the circle to take me to the hospital,” she says.

Kim Denicola Photo: David Denicola
Kim Denicola Photo: David Denicola

On the way, she lost consciousness – and the memory of everything that happened after 1980. Doctors believe that the woman survived transient global amnesia, but so far have not been able to determine the cause. “No one can say exactly what happened,” the woman complains. – It could be a microstroke that cannot be seen, or a small traumatic brain injury. Or perhaps a reaction to a cure for muscle pain that I took the night before the incident.”

People lose their memory in different ways. Soap opera characters who do not remember their name, past, or other people suffer from retrograde amnesia. With it, access to information about past events is partially or completely lost, but the rest of the memory is not disturbed.

Anterograde amnesia deprives people of the ability to create new memories. They remember everything that happened to them before the illness, but forget about what happened yesterday, an hour or even a minute ago. It was the suffering of the main character of the film “Memento”, directed by Christopher Nolan in 2000.

Transient global amnesia, which hit Kim Denikola, has the traits of both retrograde and anterograde amnesia. A person does not forget who he is and does not lose his skills (for example, the ability to drive a car), but loses his memory of the past and for some time loses the ability to create new memories. Fortunately, not forever. In most cases, transient global amnesia passes in a few hours or days, less often – weeks. Everything ends safely.

The most important memories, the hero of the film "Remember" tattooed on his skin Shot: the film "Remember"
The hero of the film “Memento” tattooed on his skin his most important memories. Frame: the film “Memento”

In 2012, the Dutch writer Daan Heerma van Voss faced transient global amnesia. The loss of memory was so short that it seems almost a curiosity. 

“All day friends, relatives and former lovers came to me to talk about what, in their opinion, was part of my life. I listened, nodded and instantly forgot their words, –he told New York Times. Gradually, I calmed down, and all my memories returned to me (however, who can guarantee that it is really all of them?). I was told that I did not have a stroke, there are no signs of permanent brain damage either. According to the doctors, I was in great shape.”

Journey to the future

The story of Naomi Jacobs from the UK, who survived transient global amnesia in 2008, is much like the case of Kim Denicola. Once she woke up with full confidence that she was 15 years old – 17 years less than in reality. “I remember looking at myself in the mirror and screaming, –she writes . – From the point of view of a 15-year-old girl, what I saw was horror. Who is this aging woman with wrinkles, spots and bags under her eyes? ”

Jacobs compares her feelings with time travel. Everything was new to her – both the world and her own life. But she, unlike Denikola, forgot only 17 years. She was transported into the future by as many as 38 years. “It was very interesting to see how much everything is different now than in the 1980s, how much has changed,” she says. – I did not know about Donald Trump, did not know who Barack Obama or Bill Clinton are. “

Naomi Jacobs Photo: iwokeupinthefuture.com
Naomi Jacobs Photo: iwokeupinthefuture.com

The only computer that she came across in 1980 was in the school library. “It was a big white box in which you had to insert a floppy disk to record information,” the woman says. “The last TV I remember was a drawer on the floor.” To switch the channel, I had to get up and go up to it. And now our TV is hanging on the wall, it is very narrow and thin. When you watch it, it’s a completely different sensation. ” She liked the video chat on the phone, the social networks were rather perplexing (to her taste, there are too many unnecessary disputes), and the television got better, but the dominance of advertising spoils everything.

Jacobs was more shocked by the meeting with himself. In her youth, she had no doubt that she would do something creative. Perhaps she will become a journalist and will travel around the world. “At 15, you don’t know who you will be at 32,” she admits. – When I woke up in the future, I wanted to say: “Wait, it’s not like I wanted.” I turned out to be a single mother, who vegetates with a cat in a tiny apartment and drives some kind of pimped. I had no work, I studied as a psychologist and lived on handouts from the state. How could this happen? I was terribly disappointed. “

New life

At first, Jacobs did not want to go to the doctors. It seemed to her that the next day she would wake up in the past, and everything would be fine. When this did not happen, the woman took out a diary that had been kept for almost 20 years and began to read it. There were answers to all her questions.

For Kim Denikola, the diary was replaced by a box of old photographs. “I’m slowly learning to connect names and faces, learning to live in 2019,” she says. Her amnesia has not passed for three months, and doctors do not exclude that the memory is lost forever.

Jacobs was lucky: her memory recovered after seven weeks. Seeing herself from aside, she decided to start her life anew. “Now everything is different,” she writes. – When I wake up, I focus on what is really important. I try to do something at least once a day that makes me like to be me. I used to be surrounded by people, because of which I thought of myself badly. After amnesia, I realized that you don’t need to think like that. This has become the foundation on which I am now building my life. ”

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Metaphysics & Psychology

What people see after clinical death: Stories from survivors that they would rather forget

What people see after clinical death: Stories from survivors that they would rather forget 87

Humanity still does not know much about death. Of course, it’s easy to write it off as “nothingness,” but what if in reality everything is a little more complicated? In the selection below – ten creepy stories “from the other world” from people who survived clinical death.

Recently, the user Aidanmartin3 asked near-death survivors on Reddit to describe what it was like. The post quickly went viral, with hundreds of people sharing their stories in the comments.

I was about fifteen years old. Climbed onto the kitchen counter to grab something from the top cabinet, but slipped and fell headlong onto the marble floor. The next thing I remember is walking barefoot on water. Then I look to the right, I see a very bright light and a hand, as if calling me. I go to her and suddenly realize how peaceful and relaxed I am. Like the best deep sleep ever. Then I said to myself: “Dude, this is so cool, I would never wake up.” And then all of a sudden everything disappears, and I wake up because of my mother, who is crying over me.By that time, I was already numb, cold, pulseless and even managed to urinate in my pants. As an atheist who does not believe in all this, I often think about that case.

Cule4444

My father died for a short while and then said that at that time he was walking along a long corridor to the door. But when he was about to open it, his father felt himself being “sucked” into his own body

Whiskeynostalgic
https://giphy.com/gifs/netflix-theoa-3oz8xZvwoATNdImiqY

GIF © Giphy

He died of an overdose for several minutes.In reality, there was nothing. It’s just darkness and an incomprehensible period of time. It was almost like waking up after hanging out all night and feeling like a horse kicked in the chest.

Th30xygen

It seemed to me that I was kind of floating in a long tunnel and I felt very tired. I remember how I fell asleep then and had a dream that I was in the kitchen of my childhood home, and dad was preparing breakfast. I heard turmoil and chaos at one end, and at the other, there was a warm light that seemed soothing. But then all of a sudden I ended up in the chaos of the emergency room.

Free_Hat_McCullough

The story of my ex-girlfriend’s mom. Her heart stopped for 28 minutes. The doctors had already told the family that she had left, and even brought in a priest to bless the room. But in the end she returned. She said that she recalls running around the field with a little girl, who, according to the woman, was her niece, in the dress in which she was buried.

CastingPouch
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GIF © Giphy

I heard a loud, high-pitched noise telling me that I am still too young to die. Then he got even higher, and I saw a bright light and woke up. The ambulance driver was shining a flashlight in my eyes

Workerhard62

Anaphylactic reaction to the deadly sting of the Irukandji jellyfish. I saw this white glow and how I soared up, then my family and the doctors and nurses who were saving me. Came back and felt a lot of pain

Georgestarr

It felt as if my body was being filmed on a CCTV camera from a third person. Then the camera gradually moved away and rose. I became very cold and began to hear loud clanking sounds. Woke up in an ambulance to the sound of a gurney bouncing on a rough road. It was so surreal. Since then I have not been afraid of death, to be honest. It was almost six years ago, but I still think about that case several times a month.

Hemptations
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GIF © Giphy

I was hit by a car. I could see everything, blood had not yet got into my eyes. I heard all the commotion. I felt myself being pushed in the back, and then doing artificial respiration … After that I felt only the first beats of the heart and how the blood flowed through my body. The pain began to build up with renewed vigor, and then everything went black

Outsider531

I was pronounced dead three times. But “after death” I have never seen anything. At least i don’t remember

Amihuman159

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Metaphysics & Psychology

Psilocybin mushrooms sprout in the blood of an ‘experimental’ patient

Psilocybin mushrooms sprout in the blood of an 'experimental' patient 88
Image: Giphy.com

US doctors described the story of a man who tried to relieve depression with psilocybin mushrooms in an unconventional way. He injected an intravenous infusion of mushrooms, causing the mushrooms to continue to multiply in his blood and cause multiple organ failure. The case was reported in the Journal of the Academy of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry.

Many drugs that people traditionally use as psychedelics are increasingly becoming the focus of medical attention. Some of them have already been repurposed and started clinical trials: for example, micro-doses of LSD have proven to be at least safe in the case of Alzheimer’s disease, and psilocybin has helped patients with  migraines and  depression. Often in such experiments we are talking about microdosing – that is, the mass of the substance is not enough for a psychoactive effect.

The story of an American who decided to experiment on his own was described by doctors led by Curtis McKnight of Creighton University School of Medicine. According to relatives, the 30-year-old American suffered from bipolar disorder, but shortly before the incident stopped taking his prescribed medications and suffered from alternating states of mania and depression.

When he stumbled upon research on the potential benefits of psychedelics, he boiled psilocybin mushrooms and injected the filtered solution into his vein. A few days after this experiment, relatives found him in a lethargic state with jaundice, diarrhea and bloody vomiting and took him to the hospital.

Doctors discovered the patient had a problem with multiple organs at once: acute renal failure, liver damage, tachycardia, and low blood saturation and ionic imbalance. He was prescribed droppers to normalize the composition of the blood, vasoconstrictors to raise blood pressure, antibiotics and antifungal drugs. Despite this, he developed septic shock and DIC (excessive blood clotting) and needed plasmapheresis. Only eight days later he was discharged from the intensive care unit, and at the time of publication of the article he had already been in the hospital for 22 days.

In the patient’s blood tests, in addition to the Brevibacillus bacteria , there were also Psilocybe cubensis fungi  – the same ones from which he injected himself intravenously. Apparently, due to insufficient filtration of the solution, the fungi entered the bloodstream and multiplied there, causing intoxication and multiple organ failure.

Psilocybin mushrooms sprout in the blood of an 'experimental' patient 89

The authors of the work note that this is not the first such case – at least in the 80s of the 20th century, doctors already described a patient with similar symptoms after an intravenous injection. Therefore, McKnight and coauthors warn their colleagues: since psychedelics are increasingly used as a medicine (at the end of 2020, they began to legalize it in the United States), it is important to remind patients of the inadmissibility of self-therapy. Intravenous administration can be dangerous – doctors still do not know if it has the same psychoactive effect as the classical methods of administration.

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Metaphysics & Psychology

A part of a person’s essence accompanies him throughout his life: this is confirmed by a brain scan

A part of a person's essence accompanies him throughout his life: this is confirmed by a brain scan 90
Photo: pixabay.com

A new method of scanning the human brain has produced amazing results. It turns out that in every person there is a certain part of his essence, which accompanies him all his life from the moment of birth to death.

Scientists believe that this is the core of a person’s self-awareness. It combines memories of the past with fleeting sensations of reality and provides a basis for anticipation of events in the future.

It turned out that a certain part of a person’s consciousness is consistent as they grow older and older.

For centuries, scientists and philosophers have been interested in the question: can this sense of “personal self” be stable throughout life? A new psychological study with the results of a brain scan made it possible to conclude that a certain part of a person’s consciousness really accompanies him throughout his life.

It is consistent as it gets older and older. Miguel Rubianes, a neuroscientist at the Complutense University of Madrid, says the aim of the study was to answer the question: Are we the same person throughout life? In combination with the results of other studies, scientists have concluded that there is a certain component that remains stable from birth to death.

The other part of consciousness remains susceptible to current changes. The scientists recognized independence as the basis of identity. And every time a person uses the word “I”, he means a thread that connects together all the events and experiences that have occurred in life.

Experience gained over the years changes a person, changes the components of his identity. Each case associated with personal experiences, a broken heart, a successful career step, expected or unexpected failure lead to the fact that a person compares himself to himself before and after these events. It is a neurological programming scheme that involves visual self-knowledge as an indicator of connection with your impressions of yourself.

This effect makes it possible to cope with memories and recognition of information when it is associated, for example, with one’s own photograph of an infant. Although this principle has a lot of evidence, scientists believe that the very mechanism of the brain involved in this remains a mystery.

This study was published in the journal Psychophysiology.

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