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Mysteries

The Unsolved Mystery of the Lubbock Lights UFO Sightings

Hundreds of people, including several university scientists, witnessed the flying blue-green lights in August 1951. One person even took photos.

August 25, 1951 was a quiet summer night in Lubbock, Texas. That evening, a handful of scientists from Texas Technical College were hanging out in the backyard of geology professor Dr. W.I. Robinson, drinking tea and chatting about micrometeorites. It was quite the brain trust: chemical engineering professor Dr. A. G. Oberg, physics professor Dr. George and Dr. W. L. Ducker, head of the petroleum-engineering department.

Which made the story of what they witnessed that night all the more curious.

“If a group had been hand-picked to observe a UFO, we couldn’t have picked a more technically qualified group of people,” wrote U.S. Air Force Captain Edward J. Ruppelt later in his definitive 1956 casebook, The Report on Unidentified Flying Objects.In the early 1950s Ruppelt served as lead investigator for Project Blue Book, the official Air Force investigations into UFO sightings, after working on its precursor effort, Project Grudge.

The Lubbock Lights, photographed by 19-year old Carl Hart, Jr. on August 30, 1951 in Lubbock, Texas.Bettmann Archive/Getty Images

Sightings of the blue-green lights kept growing

Around 9:20 p.m., the university colleagues saw something otherworldly in the expansive Texas sky: a V-shaped formation of 15 to 30 blueish-green lights passing overhead. Stunned, but still using their trained scientific reasoning, they figured the lights would reappear. And they did, about an hour later, in a more haphazard formation. The scientists were all in agreement: They had witnessed something fantastic—but what was it?

The professors weren’t the only credible witnesses to the mysterious blue-green lights that night. At dusk, in Albuquerque, New Mexico (about 350 miles away from Lubbock), an employee of the Atomic Energy Commission’s top-secret Sandia Corporation—a man with a high-level “Q” security clearance—had been sitting outside with his wife. According to Ruppelt:

They were gazing at the night sky, commenting on how beautiful it was when both of them were startled at the sight of a huge airplane flying swiftly and silently over their home… On the aft edge of the wings, there were six to eight pairs of soft, glowing, bluish lights.

Edward Ruppelt oversaw Project Blue Book for the U.S. Air Force, a program that monitored and investigated UFO reports.
Edward Ruppelt oversaw Project Blue Book for the U.S. Air Force, a program that monitored and investigated UFO reports.

An hour or so after, according to a retired rancher from Lubbock, his wife had seen something terrifying in the night sky. Ruppelt described it this way:

Just after dark, his wife had gone outdoors to take some sheets off the clothesline. He was inside the house reading the paper. Suddenly his wife had rushed into the house…“as white as the sheets she was carrying.” The reason his wife was so upset was that she had seen a large object glide swiftly and silently over the house. She said it looked like “an airplane without a body.” On the back edge of the wing were pairs of glowing bluish lights.

By the time Ruppelt flew into Lubbock to investigate the sightings in late September, hundreds of residents had seen the lights over a period of two weeks.

Locals investigate, and even snap some photos

But not everyone had waited for the government to start looking into the matter. After alerting local papers like the Lubbock Avalanche-Journal, the Texas Tech professors started their own informal investigation. In the weeks after their initial August 25sighting, they and their friends observed the lights 12 more times. They measured the lights’ angles, roughly calculated their speed and noted that they always traveled from north to south. Armed with walkie-talkies, the scientist-sleuths and their friends formed two teams and attempted to measure the UFO’s altitude, with little success.

As the days went on, more and more Lubbock residents claimed to have seen the lights. And when the professors cross-checked these reports against what they themselves had seen and recorded, many of the facts lined up, Ruppelt wrote. Of course, few if any had recorded the phenomena with the same level of detail as the professors.

But while many observers offered incomplete or poorly expressed recollections, there’s little doubt that whatever people were seeing was something real. UFO sightings are usually one-off events, but these blue-green lights were observed multiple times, by hundreds of people.

Plus, for many, there was physical proof: black-and-white photos taken by a Texas Tech freshman named Carl Hart, Jr. On August 31—the same night an Air Force wife and her daughter claimed to have seen a UFO while driving northwest from Matador, Texas, to Lubbock—Hart was keeping vigil in his bedroom, looking out for the infamous lights. According to Ruppelt:

It was a warm night and his bed was pushed over next to an open window. He was looking out at the clear night sky, and had been in bed about a half hour, when he saw a formation of the lights appear in the north… cross an open patch of sky, and disappear over his house. Knowing that the lights might reappear as they had done in the past, he grabbed his loaded Kodak 35, set the lens and shutter at f 3.5 and one-tenth of a second, and went out into the middle of the backyard. Before long, his vigil was rewarded when the lights made a second pass. He got two pictures. A third formation went over a few minutes later, and he got three more pictures.

These hotly debated images, which show a cluster of dim lights in a V-formation moving through the night sky, are the only visual representation of what hundreds were now claiming they saw.

Captain Edward Ruppelt, standing between the two seated men, with other officers of the U.S. Air Force at a 1952 news conference where they announced the installment of more than 200 cameras in attempts to obtain data on the unidentified flying objects reported from various parts of the nation.

Was it birds? Or planes? The government’s investigator goes coy

As Ruppelt began his formal investigation, he found that the lights had affected all who saw them, including a hardened old man from Lamesa, who had witnessed them with his wife. “He broke off his story of the lights and launched into his background as a native Texan, with range wars, Indians and stagecoaches under his belt,” Ruppelt recalled of their interview session. “What he was trying to point out was that despite the range wars, Indians and stagecoaches, he had been scared. His wife had been scared, too.”

The old Lamesa man had suggested that the lights were actually plover birds, a theory to which Ruppelt would lend some credence. But just like many people Ruppelt interviewed, the old man admitted he and his wife had been looking for the lights after reading about them in the paper. This was a common thread tying together many of the witnesses. “One point of interest was that very few claimed to have seen the lights before reading the professors’ story in the paper,” Ruppelt wrote. “But this could get back to the old question, ‘Do people look up if they have no reason to do so?’”

So, what exactly did all these people witness? In The Report on Unidentified Flying Objects, Ruppelt—by all accounts an honorable and fair man who oversaw what many describe as the “golden age” of the government’s official UFO investigations—offers a strangely evasive explanation:

I thought that the professors’ lights might have been some kind of birds reflecting the light from mercury-vapor street lights, but I was wrong. They weren’t birds, they weren’t refracted light, but they weren’t spaceships. The lights that the professors saw…have been positively identified as a very commonplace and easily explainable natural phenomenon…I can’t divulge exactly the way the answer was found because it is an interesting story of how a scientist set up complete instrumentation to track down the lights. Telling the story would lead to his identity and, in exchange for his story, I promised the man complete anonymity… With the most important phase of the Lubbock Lights “solved”—the sightings by the professors—the other phases become only good UFO reports.

And so, the mystery of the Lubbock Lights remains unsolved.

“The Lubbock Lights incident persists in the memory of many older citizens, and to this day captivates researchers from across the country,” Dr. Monte L. Monroe, Southwest collection archivist at Texas Tech University told Texas Highways Magazine. “Mention the event, and everyone has an opinion. Some believe the bright, semicircular, so-called ‘string of beads’ crossed the sky at great speed, high in the stratosphere. Few agree with the streetlight-illuminated, migratory duck-bellies theory ventured at the time by skeptics or in the Air Force report.”

According to Monroe, the professors and other witnesses—tired of explaining themselves and what they saw—almost totally ceased giving interviews by the 1970s. In a rare informal interview, more than 40 years after the sightings, Carl Hart, Jr. reportedly told author and UFO researcher Kevin D. Randle he still had no idea what he had photographed that pleasant August night many moons ago. But like hundreds of others witnesses in and around Lubbock that strange Texas summer, he saw something he would never forget.

Source www.history.com

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Mysteries

The mysterious death of an equally mysterious tourist

No one ever found out who this man was, what his name was and where he lived and worked. He did not hide his face and allowed many to take pictures of himself, but so far no one has identified him. And his death turned out to be frighteningly strange.

The term “hiking” in the United States refers to long walks in the fresh air, mainly in the lap of nature. And “hikers” are those who are fond of it. Hiking does not require special equipment and preparation, because the walking routes are laid along well-known paths, where there are no difficult obstacles and which pass near settlements.

Many outdoor enthusiasts, including the elderly and the disabled, practice hiking in the United States. They usually take with them a backpack, some supplies of food and water, as well as a tent if they plan to spend the night away from the settlements.

In April 2017, the man walked outside New York City and walked 2,200 miles on the Appalachian Trail, a well-known hiking trail. Then he walked the Florida Trail through Key West. It had been a long and arduous journey, but he did it easily.

Along the way, the man encountered many people, but did not tell anyone his name and seemed a little strange. He quickly became famous among other hikers and earned the nicknames “Denim” and “Mostly Harmless” from them, because his favorite book was “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy”.

Everyone he met on the trails later described him as a friendly, likeable and cheerful person who had a friendly and smiling face, but at the same time tried to stay away from other hikers. He was often asked to come on a visit to wash, dine or do laundry, but he most often turned down these offers, preferring to spend the night in his tent or in tourist hostels.

What happened to him later turned into a real detective riddle, which no one has yet solved. On July 23, 2018, two hikers, Nikolaus Horton and Logan Bull, were passing through a site called Camp Noble at Big Cypress National Reserve in Collier County, Florida. Suddenly, not far from the trail, they noticed what seemed to them an abandoned tent of bright yellow color, and out of curiosity they came closer.

Inside the tent, they found something that shook them to the core, there was the dead body of another hiker, which looked unusual even for a corpse:

“His body was twisted, and his eyes were wide open and looked straight at me.” – said Horton.

Outwardly, it was a man between the ages of 30 and 50 with a beard, but as thin and haggard as a prisoner of a concentration camp. Near the tent were his boots, walking sticks, and in the tent there was a backpack with things, a wallet with $ 3,640 in cash, and two notebooks covered with travel notes and some sort of computer-like codes.

The hikers called the police and soon an investigation was launched into the death of the unknown traveler. His body weighed only 83 pounds (37 kg) and all over it appeared that he died of severe exhaustion.

This immediately seemed very strange to everyone, because not far from this place was a road where there were eateries and cafes, and the dead man had a lot of money. Then the investigation was faced with the problem of identifying the corpse, it turned out that his prints were not in the police database, and a sample of his DNA sent for research at the University of North Texas did not show any similarity to any of the samples from the national databases.

Detectives looked through hundreds of cases of missing people in the United States to try to find a photo of a similar person, but this also did not lead to any result. Only later, when the portrait of the deceased began to be shown to other hikers, one of them recognized the deceased as a man nicknamed “Mostly harmless.”

One of the first to recognize him was a woman named Kelly Fairbanks, who said that she met him on the routes and talked, and he told her that he left New York and was walking the trails to Key West. For some time they walked along the path and Kelly spoke of him as a kind and very nice person with good eyes.

“I was surprised that he didn’t have a phone with him, it’s strange for hikers not to take the phone, and then we wished each other a good journey and said goodbye. So sorry for him, but he died doing what he loved.”

Then many more were found with whom “Harmless” met on the trails between New York and Key West, and they all told about the same. Many even photographed him as a keepsake. No one, however, knew his name, or who he worked for, whether he had family or friends.

It was discovered that he once registered at the hostel under the name Ben Bilemi, but this name was not listed in any of the US databases, so it was assumed that it was a pseudonym. Hikers could not name a single trait of “Harmless” by which it was possible to identify his identity. He did not have an unusual accent, and among his things, only unusual codes in his notebook indicated that he could be associated with computer scientists. One of the hikers claimed that Harmless once told him that he was working in the high-tech industry, but that was the only statement of this kind.

The police were taken aback. Who was this guy? Where did he come from and where did he live? If he worked in the field of IT technology, then why did no company identify him when his photos were repeatedly shown on TV? Was he engaged in some kind of secret activity, with which his strange death could be connected? In the meantime, a medical examination of Harmless’s corpse presented new puzzles.

Experts have never been able to find the cause of his death. He did not have any dangerous diseases, moreover, he was in general surprisingly in excellent health. The only clue was extreme exhaustion.

And this exhaustion was also very unusual, because it turned out that some other hikers met “Harmless” just before they found him dead, while he did not look exhausted at all. The photographs of “Harmless” taken as a souvenir by these hikers proved the veracity of their words.

All this made the case even more strange and incomprehensible, but on this the investigation finally stood up. Even the active dissemination of his photographs on social networks did not help in the hope that Internet users would recognize him.

This man did not hide his face, he had a cheerful and kind disposition, he seemed not afraid of anything and just enjoyed his rest on the trail. And then he suddenly died of extreme exhaustion in his tent, not far from the cafe and with a lot of money in his wallet. What happened to Harmless?

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Mysteries

‘Alien’ message creativity. What the crop circles really hide

At the beginning of last month, an ordinary French farmer, Gerard Benoit, suddenly became famous throughout the district. Early in the morning of July 5, 2020, walking out into his field near the town of Vimy in the very north of the country, he found that it was hopelessly spoiled. 

A little later, with the help of a drone, it turned out that the plots of crushed wheat form a gigantic pattern – the Templar cross. The farmer’s outrage knew no bounds, and he shared the “vandalism” on social networks. And completely in vain. 

A few days later, a huge geoglyph became a place of pilgrimage for thousands of curious people who began to trample the remnants of the unfortunate harvest. Mr. Benoit unwittingly turned out to be another victim of the mysterious “circles” that have regularly appeared in the fields around the world since the late 1970s. 

Tens and hundreds of thousands of enthusiasts still perceive them as evidence of contact with long-awaited extraterrestrial civilizations, although it has long been clear how these circles with an endless set of plots appear and who is really behind them. Why are these objects so common in southern England? What does the tourism industry and informal art have to do with it? Understanding.

Devil-mower

It all started in a pub, as it sometimes happens.

Location: a place called Percy Hobbs on the outskirts of the British city of Winchester in the very south of England.

Time of action: 1976.

Heroes: some Doug Bower and Dave Chorley.

Evening, it was getting dark.

The two friends were spending their time, as befits two respectable gentlemen, with a pint of ale and an interesting conversation. At some point in the conversation, Bower, who had recently returned from Australia, recalled an interesting story that flashed in Australian newspapers in the second half of the 1960s. 

Near Tully, Queensland, local farmers began reporting to police and then reporters about the mysterious circles that appeared at night in their sugarcane fields. The reasons for the appearance of the circles were never established, which made it possible with a clear conscience to call them saucer nest (“flying saucer nest”), especially since one of the farmers swore that he saw a UFO take off from this site. Having laughed at the Australians, Bower and Chorley went outside to freshen up, saw a wheat field in front of them, and then the logic of their thought, warmed up by used pints, it was quite obvious. So with the help of an ordinary iron beam and rope, their hoax began.

Over the next couple of years, friends staged several more such provocations, but no one noticed them, until in 1978 Bower and Chorley chose a particularly successful location – the natural Cheesefoot Head amphitheater, popular with tourists. 

The effect exceeded expectations – a 25-meter circle, just a circle without any pattern, first got into the regional and then national media and, naturally, fell into the sphere of close attention of various ufologists and experts in the field of inexplicable phenomena, who began to comment on the origin with a clever look object. 

It was the complete success that Bower and Chorley had been waiting for. In the future, friends themselves began to report to the media about their next work, pretending to be casual witnesses who discovered an unidentified.

The circle created by Bower and Chorley in 1978

In the second half of the 1970s – early 1980s, the popularity of all kinds of hoaxes was at its peak. Not only in narrow circles keen on the topic of the paranormal, but also among the general public, the mystery of the so-called. Bermuda Triangle, reports of another “unidentified flying object” began to be ubiquitous, the search for the “Bigfoot” was carried out in earnest, expeditions to the Scottish Loch Ness were organized. Crop circles, which began to appear in southern England, proved to be the most appropriate in such a discourse.

It immediately became clear that in fact similar objects had been recorded before. In the British Library, a pamphlet from 1678 was discovered in which a creature was doing something that looked like a circle on a field. The story of the source, whose full title was “The Devil Mower, or Strange News from Hertfordshire,” was about a farmer who refused to pay a peasant to mow a field, saying that the devil had better mow him. 

The next night, that same field was engulfed in fire, and the next morning it turned out that it was perfectly mowed. In fact, it was not very similar to the circles that appeared in England, where wheat (or other cereals) were only crushed (and not cut), but such nuances did not interest the hunters for sensations.

Much more excitement was caused by another fact – the location where these objects began to appear en masse.

Place of power

The success of the action, which began in a Winchester pub, was largely due to the place where Bower and Chorley began to arrange their antics. In the neighboring county of Wiltshire, there is the largest complex of Neolithic monuments, which by that time had already become a Mecca for lovers of everything occult. The most famous structure in this series is undoubtedly Stonehenge, located 40 minutes from Winchester. But this megalith, cult in a certain environment, did not end there. 

Fans of the New Age and similar currents were attracted by the Avebury sanctuary located in the same county (which is very conveniently a circle-ring that should have resembled objects in the wheat fields), the artificial chalk mound of Silbury Hill, the fortress of Barbury Castle, the so-called … Uffington white horse (carved in prehistoric times image of a white horse)

All these outstanding monuments of the Neolithic and Bronze Age have traditionally been in the center of attention of fans of inexplicable phenomena, who assured that the objects are covered with energy domes, connected by energy flows and, in general, are ancient relics that served for contact with someone outside of our mortal planet. 

Bower and Chorley subsequently honestly admitted that they began to stamp their circles, not least because of the reputation of the area, where, among other things, there was the densest concentration of UFO “sightings”.

Silbury Hill Mound
Avebury shrine 
Avebury shrine 
Fortress Barbury Castle
Uffington White Horse
Ridgeway road

Alien contact became the first, most popular, version of the origin of geoglyphs. However, soon the scale of what was happening acquired such a character that real scientists also took up an attempt to find a scientific explanation for it. 

The most vigorous activity in this field was developed by the meteorologist and physicist Terrence Meaden of Dalhousie University in Halifax, Canada. First, he put forward the theory that the profile of the hills in southern England directly influenced the formation of specific air vortices, which in turn could stabilize at certain points and form the necessary circle of crushed wheat. And although this version did not explain in any way why such objects (at least in such quantities) had not formed before, Bower and Chorley, who created the fake on the UFO topic, decided to take the necessary measures. 

They developed their next geoglyphs, starting to “draw” constructions from several circles instead of one circle. This, by the way, subsequently led to an ever greater complication of such objects.

In response to new facts, Meiden adapted his theory. Instead of ordinary air vortices, he made certain “electromagnetic hydrodynamic plasma vortices” responsible for the appearing mysterious formations. 

The explanation of the Canadian looked so plausible that even Stephen Hawking, after another circle appeared at his house in Cambridge, said that a certain natural vortex could have caused it. True, at the same time, the famous theoretical physicist considered human impact more likely.

A crop circle that appeared in early July of this year in France

Bower and Chorley did not give up in their fight against the scientist Meaden. In the end, in order to refute the “vortex” fabrications, they constructed an object of two circles and five rectangles. The latter certainly could not have been created by Mother Nature, which in the end had to be admitted by the unlucky Canadian meteorologist. 

Well, in 1991, Bower and Chorley decided to get their 15 minutes of fame and get out of the closet. Friends gathered the journalists and confessed to them that this whole grandiose hoax had been started by them in the second half of the 1970s. 

They said that over the past time they have created more than 200 different geoglyphs in the fields of southern England, and for convincingness they demonstrated the technology of their creation. The usual circle was extremely simple. It was necessary to determine its center, stick a conventional stick there, tie a rope to it and go around the center in a circle,

For the sake of completeness, after the formation of this exemplary circle, Bower and Chorley brought in an unsuspecting cereologist to the scene (cereology is the activity of studying “crop circles”). The expert confirmed the authenticity of the object (i.e., its inexplicable origin), after which he was quite disappointed when he was told the truth.

Occam’s razor

It must be said that the exposure of the hoax had practically no effect on the number of believers in the paranormal version of the appearance of geoglyphs. On the contrary, the hit of this entire 15-year history in newspapers and on television only contributed to the spread of such objects around the world. 

Another trend has become the progressive complication of geoglyphs. The drawing that appeared in early July 2020 on the French field is far from the most complex of those that appeared in southern England and other countries of the world. Bower and Chorley, who once started in a Winchester pub, could only envy the scale and complexity of many of them.

In the fields, not just combinations of large and small circles appeared, sometimes whole pictures were drawn there, mathematical functions, fractals were visualized (for example, the Mandelbrot set).

But if there are no questions about the authenticity of the human origin of many simple figures, for example the works of Bower and Chorley, then how much more complex drawings appeared, because many of them appeared in just one fairly short night. 

The answer to this question lies in the plane of experience and effective organization of work. Obviously, modern production of crop circles is not complete with two pairs of hands – large teams are working on them now, the actions of the participants of which are clearly coordinated. 

They already have at their disposal not only a primitive rope and a board, but also modern means of determining the geo-position, as well as laser devices that allow them to correctly calculate the distances between the elements of the figure and create objects of the desired shape.

Back in 1998, a group of authors known under the pseudonym Circlemakers demonstrated to BBC reporters the ability to create in one night the most complex spiral of 100 circles of different sizes. Even more complex drawings are sometimes made in uncrowded places, but in a few days. Or, for their creation, a formal (or informal) permission from the home team is obtained. 

Many creators of the most beautiful circles consider themselves to be real artists. Most of them even prefer to remain anonymous, as do some of their colleagues from the city streets, for example Banksy. This maintains the necessary aura of mystery of the creative process. Well, the second reason why the creators of circles do not take responsibility for their works is the fact that most often the figures in the fields can be regarded as vandalism,

Crop circle created by the Circlemakers in 1998

Despite the fact that the human origin of the circles is quite obvious (how can conventional “aliens” know, for example, about the Templar cross, and why should they draw it?), There are still many people in the world who believe in outright fantasy.

 A large number of relevant literature and specialized sites help maintain this belief. There is nothing strange about this. Firstly, rational thinking is generally not characteristic of many people, and secondly, a whole small tourism industry has been created and exists around such geoglyphs. 

Exactly the same as it happens around Loch Ness or the Bermuda Triangle. It is possible that some circles and their combinations (at least in southern England, the place of their greatest concentration) are created on purpose, as a result of the collusion of farm owners and “expert cereologists”, for whom excursions to “places of power” became a source of income. Any figure of this kind – and the latest French example confirms this once again – invariably attracts increased public attention.

Well, the victims of this whole hoax, building another theory of the origin of such tempting objects, forget about the principle of “Occam’s razor”. More often than not, the correct explanation is indeed the simplest.

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Mysteries

“Prophecy of God” about coronavirus found in an old Japanese newspaper: “Half of humans will suffer from infectious diseases in 2020”

Meticulous readers found in a newspaper thirty years ago a prediction of a coronavirus pandemic – it indicated exactly 2020 and it was predicted that half of humanity would become infected. 

The editors of the Japanese edition “Gifu Shimbun” were forced to give explanations, but this did not reassure the conspiracy theorists.

In the May 2, 1990 issue of the Gifu Shimbun, an article was published under the loud headline “Prophecy of God.” It said that in thirty years, due to global warming, the world could be swept by a pandemic of infection, which will affect half of the population. Additionally, against the background of the destruction of the ozone layer, people will also have their immunity weakened.

Conspiracy theorists who dug up the newspaper in the archives began to discuss the old publication on social networks, comparing its author to Nostradamus. Passions reached such a level that the editorial staff of “Gifu Shimbun” eventually issued a statement. The journalists explained that the article was written on the basis of the next WHO report of that time, and there are no specific details indicating the features of the coronavirus pandemic in the publication.

Japanese netizens have mixed reactions to this “prophetic” report. Some people marvel that this report is more accurate than the “big prophecy” of the French Jewish prophet Nostradamus↓

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“This is more accurate than Nostradamus’ big prediction.”

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“The big predictions of Nostradamus are more powerful than those of Nostradamus. Although the details are different, the years are all right! Even though I sometimes have things published by scientists and researchers, it’s true. Is it true?” Thoughts such as’I’ve been taken carelessly day by day, but now there are so many natural disasters, it’s time to take these issues seriously.’

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“The people who predicted the new crown are really amazing”

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“‘Half of humans are infected’ means there is more than just the new coronavirus. I want to know what the final outcome will be.”

But some people expressed disbelief↓

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“What’s this. #新冠Prophecy”

Some netizens borrowed a line from the “Doraemon” comics↓

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“Reports 30 years ago predicted that the new coronavirus epidemic has become a hot topic, but please take a look at Iduki Sugi’s comments:’I don’t believe in prophecies. People either say it by accident or are far-fetched. Interpretation attached to the meeting.'”

Nevertheless, lovers of esotericism and the theory of conspiracy began to assert that, if so, the journalists were led by a “higher power”, which, they say, was trying to give a sign to humanity. Poor WHO, which in fact issued many similar warnings, was deprived of its laurels.

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