Connect with us

Bizzare & Odd

The strange story of Jodie Lynn Myers: The Corpse Bride

Forrest Fuller nicknamed the “Groom of Doom” named for the grim plan he set in motion after jealously stabbing Jodie LynnMyers to death in 1994.

He Killed His Girlfriend … And Planned to Make Her His Corpse Bride

Being a bartender, you get used to hearing strange things. But when the bartender at The Last Stop in Fairmont, West Virginia had a customer tell her that his dead fiancée was in the backseat of his car, she had a feeling she’d probably heard the weirdest thing she ever would. It was Thanksgiving weekend, 1994, and 28-year-old Forrest Fuller had stopped in for a drink.

As word spread through the bar, police were already on their way. They’d been searching the highways ever since a woman named Lilanes Guant, had called local police with her suspicions that her friend, Jodie Lynn Myers, had been killed. The bartender slipped away to call the police to The Last Stop–and so it became Fuller’s true last stop.

Police found Myers’s body in the backseat of Fuller’s 1994 Camaro, and her wedding dress in the trunk. Already disturbed, the police’s concern only grew as they questioned Fuller about the death of his fiancée.

Forrest Fuller and Jodie Lynn Myers had had a tumultuous, on-again/off-again relationship. On the night of November 23, 1994, Myers tried to break it off for good. Their relationship had gone on for years with constant up-and-downs, and it was time to leave–she wanted a chance to find love somewhere else. This revelation was too much for Fuller to take. Flying into a jealous rage, he beat Myers. He then attempted to choke her both with his hands and his tie. After that failed, he got a kitchen knife and stabbed the woman to death.

Despite her wish to be free of him, Fuller still wanted Myers to be his wife–dead or alive. He put her body in his car, drove to the convenience store where he worked, and stole nearly $700, Myers’s corpse in tow.

On Thanksgiving Day, Fuller secured his dead fiancée in his ’94 Chevy Camaro and stuffed her wedding dress into the trunk. He then took off from his Pemberton Township, New Jersey home on a road trip to California where he intended to marry his corpse bride. Fuller only made it as far as West Virginia, where the police stopped his westward journey.

During his macabre wedding adventure, Fuller managed to find a moment to call Jodie Lynn’s mother and update her on his plans. He told the woman that he had murdered her daughter and that he still planned to wed the now-deceased Jodie Lynn. Before hanging up, Fuller promised to send Jodie Lynn’s mother her own daughter’s ring finger, adorned with the wedding ring Fuller would affix before saying “I do.”

Word of the murder and Fuller’s gruesome plan quickly spread. The tabloids labelled Fuller ‘The Groom of Doom’, and Jodie Lynn ‘The Corpse Bride’. Adding to the shock value of the case, it was revealed after Fuller’s arrest that he was already married with a young son. Apparently, his estranged wife had placed a restraining order against him–for reasons that Jodie Lynn didn’t find out until it was too late. Fuller’s wife attended his trial, along with their 10-year old son.

The sensational case drew headlines in tabloids and major newspapers alike, including The New York Times. In 2016, a Lifetime movie, Nightmare Wedding, sprang up, however the actual storyline appears to be only loosely based on the corpse bride.

Fuller is currently serving a 30-year sentence with no possibility of parole, the result of a 1995 guilty plea. In 2001, he requested a new trial, though that request was later denied.

Featured photo: rawpixel / Unsplash

Read more :The line up

Comments

Bizzare & Odd

Scientists propose to blow up a nuclear bomb in Yellowstone to prevent a catastrophic volcanic eruption

Do not be surprised, this is indeed so, and scientists are proposing to explode a nuclear charge in the caldera of the supervolcano in order to “blow off steam” and prevent a more powerful and catastrophic natural eruption for the entire planet.

Highlights

– Scientists believe that the Yellowstone supervolcano will soon “delight” the world with another eruption.
“The volcanologist said a nuclear bomb explosion could prevent a powerful eruption.”
– Starting a minor eruption can reduce magma accumulation.
– The USGS has already conducted experiments to activate the volcano by detonating a nuclear charge

The volcanologist shared his extreme plan on how to stop the violent eruption of the Yellowstone Super Volcano. His plan involves dropping a small nuclear bomb into the magma chamber of the volcano.

The Yellowstone Caldera is a massive volcano located in Yellowstone National Park. It is known that a supervolcano erupts every 600,000 – 800,000 years. Since the last major eruption occurred 630 thousand years ago, many scientists believe that the volcano is “expired” for a new powerful eruption.

Given the size of a supervolcano, a major eruption will have radical and devastating consequences. But, according to volcanologist Craig McClarren, there is a way that can prevent a powerful eruption – by minimizing its intensity.

McClarren proposes using a remotely controlled rig for drilling in Yellowstone’s magma chamber, which will cause a minor eruption and ease the pressure that builds up within the supervolcano.

If the drilling process does not cause an eruption of the volcano, then it should be provoked using a small nuclear bomb placed in the magma chamber.

“I would have a remotely controlled drilling rig drilling a magma camera,” McClarren wrote. “If this were not enough to cause an eruption, I would drop the smallest nuclear bomb in the US arsenal and detonate it”

According to the volcanologist, the explosion of a powerful bomb inside the volcano will lead to the depressurization of magma accumulating under it. Although his plan is not likely to prevent a complete eruption, he can minimize its intensity.

“The launch of a catastrophic release of volatile substances through depressurization should lead to an eruption that will be large, but still significantly smaller than what it could have exploded by itself,” he explained.

McClarren explained that his plan is based on the notion that volcanic eruptions can be accurately predicted. He structured his plan based on a hypothetical scenario that Yellowstone was supposed to explode in 10 years, giving local agencies enough time to come up with effective solutions to deal with the upcoming eruption.

Unfortunately, volcanoes are known for their unpredictable nature. Although signs of volcanic activity can be detected several weeks or months before the eruption, it is still not possible to accurately predict when the volcano will erupt.

Michael Pond, a geophysicist at the US Geological Survey and senior fellow at the Yellowstone Volcanological Observatory, was critical of such a plan:

“If you find these crazy schemes somewhat unnerving, please don’t worry – such a plan has zero chance of being implemented!

You see, unlike science fiction stories in which nuclear weapons seem to be the cause and solution of many geological disasters, scientific fact tells us that you are unlikely to cause a Yellowstone cataclysm with nuclear weapons.

How do we know? This is because a similar experiment has already been tried. ”

Continue Reading

Bizzare & Odd

Strange natural phenomena resembling magic

In nature, there are often incredible phenomena that at first glance are perceived as magic. The publication Popular Mechanics described some of these phenomena – in particular, the circles of fairies in Namibia, the lifeless Lake Natron in Tanzania , and the mummification of starlings (see video below).

In the desert of Namibia you can meet strange circles, the diameter of which reaches fifteen meters – scientists have studied these formations far and wide, but have not yet come to a consensus on their nature. Some say that this is the result of termite activity, while others argue that the whole thing is in the plants that create circles, competing for access to water. Locals, meanwhile, believe that a dragon creates a circle that lives underground.

In Tanzania there is Lake Natron, whose lifeless waters frighten and fascinate at the same time. There is a huge concentration of salt and alkali in the lake, therefore halophilic cyanobacteria live in it. And, suddenly, small flamingos that come here to hatch eggs (this is facilitated by warm water and an unpleasant odor that scares away predators).

Murmuring starlings is an amazing phenomenon, which you must see at least once in your life. If you look at a flock of birds, which behaves as a single living organism, then you can very easily believe in magic.

On the dried-up Lake in the Death Valley in the USA, there are creeping stones moving on their own at a speed of 2-5 meters per minute. After extensive research, scientists have discovered that stones move along thin and long sections of ice.

Residents of the city of Taos in the United States for many years hear a noise coming from the desert. However, on that side there is no highway on which heavy machinery could move. This noise was called “Taos rumble”, and only locals hear it. Scientists could not establish the source of the rumble, but suggested that it could be power lines passing near the city.

Near the city of Hessdalena in Norway, white lights appear , the origin of which is not known until this time.

Continue Reading

Bizzare & Odd

In Scotland, Hurricane Chiara brought ashore the skeleton of a mysterious creature

On the northeast coast of Scotland, a skeleton of an unknown sea creature was discovered. It washed up on the land as a result of the storm “Chiara” .

An intriguing creature was discovered on Sunday, February 9, according to the Daily Mail . This happened after strong winds and heavy rain fell in the region. A photograph of the skeleton was published on Facebook. Commentators have suggested that the remains may belong to a whale or dolphin, while the creature has horns. Some have not ruled out that this is the skeleton of a Loch Ness monster.

Marine biologists are bewildered and can not determine what kind of creature carried ashore Scotland. Professor David Lusso from the University of Aberdeen said that the published picture does not allow to draw accurate conclusions, therefore, photos from other angles will be required.

According to Scottish legend, the Loch Ness monster lives in a local lake. To this day, there is no exact evidence that it really exists. In 1934, London physician R. Kenneth Wilson photographed the allegedly Loch Ness monster, but in 1994 they proved that this picture was fake.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

DO NOT MISS

Trending