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Mysteries

The strange and unexplained phenomenon of raining stones

The strange and unexplained phenomenon of raining stones 92

April Holloway The Epoch Times

Throughout history, there have been numerous recorded instances of strange objects falling from the sky – fish, frogs, candy, jellyfish, beans, nuts, seeds, and all manner of bizarre and unlikely objects. A popular theory explains these events as being caused by strong winds that whisk things up from the ground or water and hurl them towards an unsuspecting town many miles away. But can this theory also explain showers of heavy stones that have been known to damage houses and even kill people and livestock?

A Long History of Raining Objects

One of the first recorded instances of “raining” objects comes from the writings of Roman philosopher and naturalist Pliny the Elder, who documented storms of frogs and fish in the 1st century A.D. in what is now Italy.

In the 3rd century A.D., ancient Greek rhetorician and grammarian Athenaeus wrote in his work The Deipnosophists (Book VIII): “In Paeonia and Dardania it has, they say, before now rained frogs; and so great has been the number of these frogs that the houses and the roads have been full of them; and at first, for some days, the inhabitants, endeavoring to kill them, and shutting up their houses, endured the pest; but when they did no good, but found that all their vessels were filled with them, and the frogs were found to be boiled up and roasted with everything they ate, and when besides all this, they could not make use of any water, nor put their feet on the ground for the heaps of frogs that were everywhere, and were annoyed also by the smell of those that died, they fled the country.”

The strange and unexplained phenomenon of raining stones 93

1555 engraving of raining fish

Since then, numerous other unusual instances have been documented, including a storm in Italy in 1840 that deposited thousands of partially germinated Judas Tree seeds native to Central Africa; a dusting of sugar crystals in 1857 in Lake County, Calif.; a rain of hazelnuts over Dublin, Ireland, in 1867; live pond mussels in Paderborn, Germany, in 1892; and jellyfish in Bath, England, in 1894.

Perhaps one of the most exciting “rains” to occur was the shower of 16th-century coins that fell from the sky on June 16, 1940, in the Russian village of Meschera. Archaeologists hypothesized that a strong wind swept up a buried trove that had been exposed by soil erosion, before dropping it back down.

One of the first scientists to address the strange phenomena of raining objects was E.W. Gudger, an ichthyologist at the American Museum of Natural History. Gudger published a paper in the journal Natural History, titled “Rains of Fishes,” in the early 20th century in which he suggested four possible explanations for showers of marine species.

First, he suggested that certain “out-of-place” animal species may simply be on their migration. Secondly, that fish or other marine species were left stranded on land after overflow from ponds or streams. Third, that estivating fish, awakened by heavy rains, had burrowed to the surface. And fourth, that the fish had been whisked out of the ocean or lake by waterspouts or tornadoes and dumped to the ground many miles away.

The strange and unexplained phenomenon of raining stones 94

Waterspouts have been mentioned as one of the explanations for raining objects

The latter theory has received the most support. Jerry Dennis writes in his book It’s Raining Frogs and Fishes: Four Seasons of Natural Phenomena and Oddities of the Sky, that theoretical calculations suggest that “golf ball-sized hail requires an updraft of more than 100 miles per hour, which would be more than powerful enough to loft small fish high into a thundercloud.”

However, some occurrences of falling objects cannot as easily be explained by this theory. The phenomena of raining stones, for example, has been known to last for several days or even weeks, and with rocks too large to be carried long distances in the wind.
Raining StonesLike the phenomena of raining animals, raining stones have been documented throughout history. One of the earliest accounts is from 1557, when Conrad Lycosthenes’s Chronicles of Prodigies, described a rain of stones bringing death to people and livestock.

During the Middle Ages, occurrences of stones falling from the sky were attributed to creatures of supernatural origin or even the devil. In 1690, folklorist Robert Kirk wrote in his book The Secret Commonwealth that falling stones were caused by subterranean inhabitants called “invisible wights” – similar to goblins or brownies – which would hurl the stones around, but never with the intention to hurt anyone. In 1698, stones fell from the sky in New Hampshire, which was recorded in a pamphlet titled Lithobolia, or the Stone-Throwing Devil.

The strange and unexplained phenomenon of raining stones 95

An illustration of a rain of stones from “Don Quixote.”

One of the most well-known cases of falling stones occurred in Harrisonville, Ohio, in Oct. 1901. The Buffalo Express, a small local newspaper, reported that on Oct. 13, “a small boulder came crashing through the window of Zach Dye’s house.” Nobody was seen in the vicinity. But this was just the beginning. Within a few days, the whole town was supposedly afflicted by stones and boulders falling from a clear sky. Perplexed as to where the stones were coming from, the townspeople rounded up all the men and boys of Harrisonville to rule out the phenomenon being caused by a gang of trouble-makers (it was assumed that females would not be capable of such as act). The stones continue to fall. Several days later, the rain of stones stopped just as suddenly as it had started.

Since this event, there have been many other documented occasions of stones falling from the sky, including in Sumatra (1903), Belgium (1913), France (1921), Australia (repeatedly between 1946 and 1962), New Zealand (1963), New York (1973), and Arizona (1983).

Explanations for Raining Stones

Scientists have admitted that they really do not have a definitive answer for the strange phenomena of raining stones. Over the years, many theories have been proposed from poltergeist activity to supernatural beings, gangs of stone-throwers, volcanoes, meteorites, tornadoes, and even divine retribution, as seen in the reference (Joshua 10:11): “the Lord cast down great stones from heaven upon them until Azekah, and they died.”

On Nov. 23, 2013, thousands of small rocks fell from the sky over Sicily, Italy, which began after Mount Etna, an active volcano, spewed out pumice stones, dust, and ash into the sky. Cars became covered in small, sharp, black rocks. This certainly explains one instance of falling stones. However, many recorded events do not match this description.

Another popular explanation is tornadoes or tornado-like conditions. However, rocks have been reported to fall even in fine weather and in countries that do not experience tornadoes. Furthermore, tornadoes are only capable of scooping up debris and shooting it outwards on ballistic trajectories. They do not cause debris to fall downwards from the sky far from the point of origin.

Some experts have argued that raining stones may be caused by a meteorite entering Earth’s atmosphere and fragmenting into thousands of smaller stones. However, such an event is usually accompanied by a sonic boom, which has not been documented in any of the reported cases, and this theory would have a hard time accounting for events that have lasted days or even weeks.

As with many unusual and unexplained phenomena, scientists and academics have been reluctant to examine the subject in any rigorous manner. Presumably, examining the nature of the rocks and whether they are local to the area in which they fall or from further afield, including from outerspace, could help to at least shed some light on mystery. Until then, we are left with mere speculations as to what causes this bizarre phenomena.

April Holloway is an editor and writer with Ancient-Origins. She completed a Bachelor of Science degree and currently works as a researcher.

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Mysteries

Mysterious Lake Funduji: why you can’t take water from this African lake

Mysterious Lake Funduji: why you can't take water from this African lake 100

In the northeast of the Republic of South Africa is the picturesque, but mysterious and ominous Lake Funduji. The local population considers the lake sacred and tells legends about it.

Despite the problems with fresh water in Africa, the tribes never settled on the banks of the Funduji, did not fish there and did not even replenish the water supplies from this lake.

This is because, according to local legends, it is impossible to take a drop of water from Lake Funduji, and anyone who touches the water, or even more so drinks it, will soon die. Also, people made sacrifices to the mythical monster Funduji to appease him.

The general public learned about Funduji at the beginning of the 20th century, when deposits of chrome ore were found in the vicinity of the lake. When expeditions from Europe began to come to this area, the lake was finally mapped.

Scientists listened to the stories of the locals about the ominous lake and the monster, but in the course of geological research, nothing mystical was found.

Mysterious Lake Funduji: why you can't take water from this African lake 101

In 1955, Professor Henry Burnside and his assistant Thacker decided to check the legend about strange water that cannot be carried away from the lake. Scientists collected water in several containers made of different materials – glass, porcelain and plastic, and walked several kilometers, intending to examine the samples.

But it was not possible to carry out the analysis: in the morning all the containers were empty. Then the scientists decided to return to the lake and take new samples. This time, Burnside dipped his finger into the water and tasted it: the taste of the water was bitter-rotten.

Throughout the day, scientists observed the containers, but no changes occurred, and by morning the vessels were empty again. Burnside intended to go back to the lake and examine water samples on site, but the plans were prevented by a sudden deterioration in his health: the professor was hospitalized, and a week later he died – as it later turned out, from intestinal inflammation.

It would seem that there is evidence of sinister legends, but there is still a scientific explanation for the phenomena of Lake Funduji. In fact, chromium ore deposits are the cause of the anomalies.

Chromium salts are very toxic to humans, and the concentration of chromium in the lake was so high that a couple of drops killed Professor Burnside.

Mysterious Lake Funduji: why you can't take water from this African lake 102

The disappearing water phenomenon is also explained by the high chromium content. At temperatures below 19 degrees Celsius, chromium particles in water crystallize (therefore, the water “disappeared” at night, when it was cooler). In fact, the liquid from the vessel does not go anywhere, but turns into a solid state, scattering along the bottom and walls of the vessel.

To be fair, some of Funduji’s riddles have not yet been solved – for example, it is not clear why a large number of crocodiles live in the poisonous lake. It is also unclear what these reptiles eat, because there are no fish in the lake, and other animals do not go there to drink.

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Mysteries

Descent into the Unknown: Blogger revealed the secret of the mysterious tunnel in the pyramid of Cheops

Descent into the Unknown: Blogger revealed the secret of the mysterious tunnel in the pyramid of Cheops 103

The pyramid of Cheops is one of the seven wonders of the world. This is one of the largest ancient buildings, which contains many secrets. Recently, some experts have been worried about what hides the blocked tunnel near the underground chamber.

Blogger Ben van Kerkwick, who hosts the UnchartedX YouTube channel, managed to get into the tunnel. The video is two hours long and shows the entire journey. Ben was surprised that the tunnel helped to find the descending and ascending passages, although, according to the idea, they cannot be found.

The blogger explored the Cheops pyramid with his team. All passages were covered with granite blocks. The group followed to the Great Gallery, and Ben van Kerkwick – to the underground chamber. 

Archaeologists noted that the mysterious passage crosses the rock on which the base of the pyramid is located. The blogger was struck by the skill of the engineers: the discovered 87-meter passage turned out to be perfectly straight.

The underground camera was incredibly deep. There was a mysterious door there, where it led is still unknown. This confirms the opinion that the structure keeps many secrets.

The pyramid was erected 4.5 thousand years ago for Pharaoh Cheops, who was the ruler of the 4th dynasty.

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Mysteries

A giant pink ball cloud appeared over the site of a meteorite in China

A giant pink ball cloud appeared over the site of a meteorite in China 104

A giant pink ball appeared near the place where a cosmic body fell in China. It arose immediately after the collision of an asteroid with the Earth and a powerful explosion. A giant spherical cloud formed over the meteorite impact site. 

The meteorite fell on December 23 in Qinghai province (PRC). According to eyewitnesses, immediately after the explosion of the fireball, a giant spherical structure appeared over the crash site, which hovered over the Dealing highway.

The strange pink formation hung in the air for about 40 minutes and then evaporated. Locals used various metaphors in their descriptions of the sphere, for example, someone compared this phenomenon with a “bright pink moon”, while others called it “a leisurely round cloud”. Someone remembered that a meteorite had already fallen in China last fall, and then a coronavirus pandemic began around the world. Moreover, its distribution began from the PRC.

The first thing that ufologists-conspiracy theorists immediately start thinking about is the appearance of Nibiru, which is hidden from us almost all the time by chemtrails, but from time to time the wind blows the fog away and strange appearances begin in the sky:

What is noteworthy is that the temporary distance between the meteorite that fell on Tibet on December 23 and this pink object was only 12 hours and the observation sites were relatively close by the standards of China – that is, everything happened somewhere in the northern part of Tibet. Therefore, maybe in the morning not quite a meteorite fell there. 

If it was Nibiru, then its appearance as a separate astronomical object suggests that its trajectory has slightly changed and it will now begin to appear in different places in the Solar system. Something similar is predicted in a number of ancient and not very apocalyptic prophecies of Christian mystics.

Nibiru itself is not directly mentioned there and, perhaps, this fragment was simply removed by the censor at one time, but the prophecies say that before the End of the World “there will be two winters and two summers”. That is, the arrangement of seasons in a year will become quite dense. One of the possible explanations for such strange changes involves the appearance of another star in the solar system. 

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