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The next pandemic coming out of Sudan? New mysterious disease kills 90 – WHO launches investigation

The next pandemic coming out of Sudan? New mysterious disease kills 90 - WHO launches investigation 1
© AP Photo/Ben Curtis

The World Health Organization (WHO) has set up an emergency task force to travel to South Sudan to investigate a mysterious disease that has left at least 89 people dead in just a few days.

The African Ministry of Health has given details of a rapidly spreading disease in the city of Fangak, with local scientists having not yet been able to identify it. Recently, the area was hit by floods, with health workers collecting samples in an effort to find out more.

According to local officials, the initial samples rule out the presence of cholera, while the WHO team arrived in Fangak by helicopter, as floods made access by other means impossible.

“We decided to send a team to go and do research and risk assessment. “He will be able to collect samples from patients, but the initial reports we received put the death toll at 89,” a World Health Organization official told the BBC.

For his part, a local government spokesman said the severe floods in South Sudan had boosted the spread of diseases such as malaria and caused malnutrition in children due to food shortages.

in a warm climate situation where everything around is flooded, there is simply no way to do without malaria and dysentery. Therefore, 89 people could die there – the conditions are favorable for this. For all that, there are some considerations:

The flood happened in August, and now it’s December. There is no tropical disease with such a long incubation period. 

Floods in Sudan happen every year, regularly, at the same time but WHO does not send rapid response teams there as they are suddenly doing now.

Let us not forget that Sudan is a country somewhere in the fourth world, and now, as if on command, it is on the forefront of the news headlines. All the newspapers published the ‘mysterious disease’ in 3-4 hours. That is, they brought information to billions of people. 

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Also, a lot of ‘important’ people, from Bill Gates to WHO, talked about a new, forthcoming pandemic. 

Recall that when covid appeared in China, they also broadcast about some kind of “pneumonia of unknown nature”, from which two or three people died. 

In the light of the above, we do not exclude that a new plague will come from Africa, although it difficult to say how realistic this assumption is now, nevertheless, we think that in two or three weeks everything will become clear.  

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