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Mysteries

The Lost Dutchman Gold Mine

The Lost Dutchman Gold Mine (also known by many similar names) is, according to legend, a very rich gold mine hidden in the southwestern United States. The location is generally believed to be in the Superstition Mountains, near Apache Junction, east of Phoenix, Arizona. There are also theories that the mine lies a considerable distance beyond the Superstition Mountains, in Mexico. There have been many opinions about how to find it, and each year people search for it. Some have died on the search.

The mine is named for German immigrant Jacob Waltz, who purportedly discovered it in the 19th century and kept its location a secret. (“Dutchman” was a common, though inaccurate, American slang term for “German,” derived from the German word for “German” – “Deutsch”).

The Superstition Mountains to the east of Phoenix, AZ reportedly hold a legendary motherlode of gold known as the Lost Dutchman Gold Mine. Truth and fiction about this mine have been unrevokably mixed up through the years, producing 62 varieties of the legend. But before we get into those, here are some genuine facts about the Lost Dutchman Gold Mine:

There really was a Lost Dutchman, although he wasn’t Dutch. Jakob Waltz was nicknamed Dutch (i.e. from the Netherlands) because he was Deutsch (i.e. from Germany; a common error, see also ‘Pennsylvania Dutch’). A man of that name was born in Württemberg in 1810 and emigrated to the US. From the 1860s onward, he homesteaded in Arizona, pursuing mining and prospecting as a hobby – a quite unsuccessful one. Waltz fell ill and died in 1891, but not before revealing the location of an alleged gold mine to Julia Thomas, the neighbour who cared for him. As early as Sept 1, 1892, a local newspaper relates how Thomas and others were trying to locate the mine. When they failed, it is reported they sold copies of a map for $7 each. After about a decade, the story sank into obscurity, regaining notoriety when it had acquired more spectacular aspects, in a fashion not dissimular to a game of Chinese whispers.

The Lost Dutchman is perhaps the most famous lost mine in American history. Arizona place-name expert Byrd Granger notes that, as of 1977, the Lost Dutchman story had been printed or cited at least six times more often than two other fairly well-known tales, the story of Captain Kidd’s lost treasure, and the story of the Lost Pegleg mine in California. Robert Blair notes that people have been seeking the Lost Dutchman mine since at least 1892, while Granger writes that according to one estimate, 8,000 people annually made some effort to locate the Lost Dutchman’s mine.[2] Former Arizona Attorney General Bob Corbin is among those who have looked for the mine. Others have argued the existence of the mine has little or no basis in fact. But as noted below, Blair argues that all the main components of the story have at least some basis in fact.

According to many versions of the tale, the mine is either cursed, or protected by enigmatic guardians who wish to keep the mine’s location a secret. The basic points of the legend hold that German immigrant Jacob Waltz — the proverbial “dutchman” — found a fabulously wealthy gold mine in the Superstition Mountains sometime after 1863. When he died in 1891, he left a crudely drawn map giving only hints to the mine’s location. Ever since, treasure hunters have come from all over the world searching, but none has ever found it. Today we’re going to look into the depths of the tale and see what’s probably true, and what other elements might spare the Dutch Hunters a great deal of effort.

It is Waltz’s map that has been the centerpiece of the story. It’s a fact that almost from the day he died, reproductions of it have been abundant and openly sold as tourist items, with no way for anyone to judge the origins of any of them. It seems quite hopeless to learn anything from any of these maps; in fact, the more research one does, the more one learns that none of them are trustworthy. Even Waltz’s original map was suspect. It was made while he was on his deathbed, when he revealed his secret to Julia Thomas, owner of the boarding house where he lived. She drew that first map based on his description. After he passed, Ms. Thomas and two miner friends followed Waltz’s instructions to the letter, but found nothing. To pay her debts, she began printing and selling souvenir copies of the map. All the maps that have ever existed since then have been copied or made up based on her original, which was already proven to lead nowhere. For a fee, Thomas sold her tale to newspaperman Pierpont Constable Bicknell, whose 1895 article in the San Francisco Chronicle made the Lost Dutchman mine a permanent fixture in history.

And since then, innumerable variations of the story have arisen, mostly the colorations of 20th century authors. Some have two “dutchmen”, with a companion named Weisner joining Waltz; some have gunfights, robberies, and all sorts of romantic additions. It’s such a confused mess of pseudohistory that it seems hopeless to do a serviceable skeptical analysis. This might be the case if it were not for one man, a 1930s Dutch Hunter whose tragic death in the Superstitions launched the Lost Dutchman mine from colorful story to eternal legend.

Adolph Ruth and his son Erwin, both veterinarians by trade, loved their hobby of treasure hunting. Although they hailed from Washington, DC, they traveled as far as California in search of legendary riches. For them, the adventure was not so much about actually finding anything than it was about father and son companionship. However, they had a very special advantage over other treasure hunters. During the Mexican Revolution (1910-1920), Erwin, the younger, had provided valuable veterinary services to essential livestock for a powerful Mexican family. Señor Gonzales thanked Erwin with a gift of maps, maps that had come down from his cousins the Peraltas. The Peraltas were a noteworthy mining family who had operated mines throughout the American southwest when it had belonged to Mexico, and these maps showed the locations of many of their mines.

Adolph and Erwin Ruth made many trips together. They never found much, but were undeterred. The pivotal moment came when Adolph, the elder, made a trip to the Superstition Mountains all by himself to give the Lost Dutchman a try in the summer of 1931. There he met Tex Barkley, a rancher who owned much of the Superstitions, and who also outfitted and guided Dutch Hunters. Barkley had hunted for the Lost Dutchman himself, of course, and was most intrigued to meet this friendly elderly gentleman from the east who showed up with a pocketful of authentic Peralta maps.
Adolph Ruth was 78 years old, physically very frail, and limped with a cane due to a hip injury sustained in one of his previous adventures. It was June, one of the hottest months of the year, when even the most stalwart of Dutch Hunters avoided the savage heat of the Superstitions. Tex Barkley sent two of his best men to pack Ruth into the mountains, to a good camp with a permanent water supply. One of the men returned a few days later, with some supplies and (more importantly) to check on the old man to make sure he was all right. Sadly, Barkley’s worst fears were confirmed: Adolph Ruth was gone. Barkley and two local sheriff agencies immediately launched three large-scale searches. Erwin Ruth came as quickly as he could to direct the efforts to find his father, but it was to no avail. After three months, the searches were called off. Erwin accepted the inevitable fact that his father had perished in search of the Lost Dutchman.
And then, in December of 1931, an archaelogical expedition was in the area to study some ancient ruins from the Salado culture. The archaeologists had a dog, Music, who had gotten himself into trouble by eating up all the expedition’s steaks. But Music redeemed himself by following a scent to the base of a palo verde tree, where sat Adolph Ruth’s skull, upright among the cactuses. The skull was punched through side to side, apparently by a bullet.
When the news broke, Tex Barkley and a party of five rode and found the rest of Ruth’s body about a kilometer away, and about ten back-breaking kilometers from Ruth’s original camp. This search was thoroughly documented by several of the men who were present, including a couple of newspapermen. In a small memorandum book in the breast pocket of Ruth’s body was found the following handwritten note:

Lost Dutchman Gold Mine
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The mine lies within an imaginary circle, whose diameter is not more than 5 miles, and whose center is marked by the Weaver’s Needle, which is about 2,500 feet higher, among a confusion of lesser peaks and mountain masses of basaltic rock. The first gorge on the south side from the west end of the range. They found a monumental trail which lead them northward past Sombrero Butte into a long canyon. Travel northward in the gorge and up over a lofty ridge, thence downward past the Needle into a canyon running north, and finally into a tributary canyon, very steep and rocky, and densely wooded with a continuous thicket of scrub oak.
Barkley’s party of five wasted no time in following up this new lead. Barkley knew well the canyon and the place described in the note; Weaver’s Needle remains the centerpiece landmark in the Superstition Mountains. One of the party, deputy sheriff Jeff Adams, wrote in an official report:
We found intact all of his papers including the map or directions to be taken to find the Lost Dutchman Mine which Mr. Ruth was supposed to be trying to locate. After finding and assembling these bones we followed the directions given to reach the alleged Lost Dutchman Mine. This trip took us two days of very hard labor and following there [sic] directions we came to the place pointed out in the instructions and found no evidence of any human being ever having been there at any time in the past.
The press went into a frenzy over the news of the old treasure hunter murdered for his map; and most especially, for the tantalizing handwritten note. News spread that Ruth’s map had been a Peralta map. Research into Jacob Waltz revealed that Julia Thomas had discovered high grade gold ore under Waltz’s bed. No doubt remained, in the public eye, that a magnificent gold mine lay waiting in the Superstitions. Estimates say that as many as 80 Dutch Hunters have died since, searching for the riches for which Adolph Ruth had apparently been killed. This suspicion was bolstered by the result obtained when Erwin had the skull sent home for identification by Dr. Aleš Hrdlicka:
My examination positively determined that it is the skull of an aged white man. Holes in the skull, one over an inch in diameter on the left side and a much larger one on the right side, indicate a strong probability that the man was shot to death by a shotgun or a large caliber rifle and that the shot or bullet passed somewhat downwardly from the left. I have examined such wounds before and have examined skulls with bullet wound holes found on battlefields. I hold a degree as a Doctor of Medicine, have medico-legal instruction, and have been engaged in anthropological work for many years. At present I am Curator of Physical Anthropology for the National Museum.
The December 19th, 1931 Arizona Republic proclaimed “Skull Believed that of Missing Prospector Found in Mountains”. All the ducks were in a row for the story to be true as popularly believed. But what about that map, the map of impeccable provenance, the driver of so many deaths such as Ruth’s? Following its thread, the story begins to unravel, stitch by inevitable stitch.
There’s little reason to doubt that Adolph and Erwin used genuine Peralta maps, gifted by the Gonzales family, to pursue various treasures. However, it turns out that there’s no evidence that the Peraltas ever mined in the Superstitions. The Superstition Mountains are, geologically, not a place where gold would be abundant. Placer mining — the type practiced by Jacob Waltz — takes place throughout the region to a limited degree, but there have never been any profitable strikes. In placer mining, gold flecks are scattered in the soil, having washed down from the mountains above. When miners find such gold on a slope, they follow it uphill to the source. If a rich deposit did indeed exist at the surface somewhere, it’s likely that some placer miner would have found its tailings in the alluvial fans below.
Whatever “map” Adolph brought to Tex Barkley was not a Peralta. Note that Deputy Adams described it only as “the map or directions”; there’s no record that Adolph Ruth had a pictorial map at all. And furthermore, the text of Ruth’s handwritten directions found on his person came from — you guessed it — P.C. Bicknell’s 1895 article in the San Francisco Chronicle. The map accompanying the Arizona Republic’s 1931 article was — you guessed it again — virtually identical to the ones sold by Julia Thomas forty years earlier.
With little doubt, the infamous treasure map that led Adolph Ruth to his doom was little more than a secondhand verbal account, told by a lady who made a living selling a story attached to souvenir maps, based on the alleged claims of a miner who never made a red cent mining. Among the few contemporary accounts of Jacob Waltz were that he kept a small supply of rich gold ore in order to attract interest in his mining claims; probably what Ms. Thomas found under his bed. Ore like that came from quartz, and was unlike the placer gold found around the Superstitions. 

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Mysteries

NASA has photographed a UFO in Antarctica

This new discovery is undoubtedly of great global impact for those who believe in the existence of UFOs and Extraterrestrials on our planet. The image of NASA depicting a UFO on the Antarctic continent was published on Google Earth. Antarctica has constantly aroused many mysteries, from the entrance to the Hollow Earth to the discovery of alien bases and the discovery of pyramid structures.

Even so, today all its secrets are hidden, although it begins to reveal some clues that amaze geologists, archaeologists, scientists, popularizers and even great personalities of the world. Whatever the mysteries of Antarctica, they will have to be discovered little by little. Who is not fascinated by the secrets of the most arid, windy and cold continent in the world? What is the truth about this unexplored and frozen continent? In the images provided by Google Earth we can see a silver circular object that has nothing to do with the rest of the surface.

It is clearly an artificial object and very similar to the classic flying saucer. This discovery was made by Argentine researcher Marcelo Irazusta and published by Sandra Andrade on her YouTube channel. This new discovery is undoubtedly of great global impact for those who maintain the existence of UFOs on our planet. The image is from NASA published on Google Earth. With this new discovery no doubt, it is of great global impact for those of us who believe in UFOs and extraterrestrials on our planet. We know that they discovered internal structures similar to the ruins of a technologically advanced ancient civilization, and it was also leaked that some frozen bodies of non-human beings appeared.

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Mysteries

The Mystery of the Taman Shud Case

The mystery of the Taman Shud case has puzzled law enforcement and intelligence agencies all over the world for more than half a century now.

Also referred to as “The Mystery of the Somerton Man”, this unsolved case refers to an incident that took place on December 1, 1948 where and unidentified male body was found dead at 6:30 a.m. on the shore of Somerton Beach in Adelaide, Australia.

Police found his body after a handful of various witnesses reported what they suspected was a man who was either drunk or asleep, reclining on the sand with his head resting against the seawall.

He was clothed in fine European attire, but all of the labels had been deliberately torn off from his clothing, indicating a possible attempt to conceal his identity. His dental records did not match any known individual in Australia.

Police searched his pockets in an attempt to find some type of identification, but to no avail; their search only produced a redeemed bus ticket, an unused second-class railway ticket, a half-empty pack of Juicy Fruit gum, some cigarettes, and a partially empty box of matches.

After several unsuccessful attempts to confirm the man’s identity and potential cause of death, police turned to an autopsy.

According to Sir John Burton Cleland, a noted University of Adelaide pathologist, the man’s body had all of the signs of a death by poisoning, including severe congestion in the liver, kidneys and brain.

The man’s spleen was enlarged about three times the normal size, and a significant amount of blood was located in his stomach as well.

Interestingly enough, several toxicology experts attempted to determine what type of poison was used, but it was completely undetectable in his body.

Authorities ruled the death a suicide by an unknown poisonous substance, but after a careful re-examination of the body by Sir Cleland, a small rolled-up piece of paper was discovered deep within a small fob pocket inside of the deceased man’s trouser pocket.

The paper contained the words “Taman Shud” (meaning “ending”, “finished” or “the end” in Persian) printed on it, and the reverse side was blank.

Public library officials were able to determine that the phrase came from the text of a collection of poems known as The Rubaiyat by Persian philosopher Omar Khayyam.

Police conducted a widespread campaign to find the book that the text was torn from, circulating images of the piece of paper in the press all over Australia.

A man whose identity has been kept anonymous by the police came forward and revealed that he had discovered a very rare copy of The Rubaiyat in the backseat of his parked, unlocked car on Jetty Road in Genelg about two weeks prior to the discovery of the body.

The man said that he had no idea that the book had any connection to the case until he read about it in the newspaper.

The book was missing the phrase “Taman Shud” on the very last page, and microscopic tests confirmed that the small piece of paper found in the Somerton man’s trouser pocket was indeed torn from the final page of the book.

Five lines of all-capital letters were scrawled in pencil in the very back of the book, delineating what authorities have ruled as some type of code.

Investigators first conjectured that the lines represented a foreign language, but that was later ruled out in favor of some type of cipher or cryptographic message. The five lines are as follows:

WRGOABABD

MLIAOI (this second line was struck through in the original message, indicating a possible mistake due to its similarity to line 4)

WTBIMPANETP

MLIABOAIAQC

ITTMTSAMSTGAB

A phone number was also written in the back of the book, which police later discovered belonged to a woman who resided on Moseley Street in Glenelg, only about a quarter of a mile from the location where the body was discovered. (Side note: Glenelg was also the destination listed on the bus ticket found in the Somerton man’s pocket.)

After being questioned by police, she stated that she did own a copy of The Rubaiyat during the time when she worked as a nurse at the Royal North Shore Hospital (in Sidney) during the second World War, but that she had given her copy to an Australian Army lieutenant named Alfred Boxall in 1945.

Police were now certain that the dead man could be identified as Alfred Boxall, until the real Alfred Boxall surfaced later with a different copy of The Rubaiyat (a 1942 edition), with the last page containing the phase “Taman Shud” intact!

The woman and did not claim to have any connection to the dead man discovered at Somerton beach. She asked to remain anonymous since she was newly married with a toddler, and did not want to be associated with a murder mystery or Boxall.

Amazingly, the police agreed to grant her anonymity, although she was considered to be the best lead in the case.

To this day, the identity of the Somerton man has not yet been confirmed, and the meaning of the cipher (if any) has not been determined.

Many have speculated that the mysterious man may have been some type of spy since his death occurred during a particularly intense period of the Cold War.

Several intelligence specialists, cryptanalysts, mathematicians and astrologers have attempted to decipher the code, but no one has been successful as of yet.

Perhaps the enigma of the Taman Shud case will never be solved, but it still carries an air of mystery and intrigue that fascinates people all over the world.

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Mysteries

The Mercury Monolith is proof that an Extraterrestrial Civilization inhabited the Solar System

It seems that Mars is not the only planet in our solar system that hosts mysterious monoliths. According to the images recorded by space probes, relative to the surface of Mercury, the “fire” planet is added to the list of planets and moons of our solar system, which show fascinating anomalies, which according to many, show that there is alien life, or at least it existed up to a certain point, in our solar system.

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Many researchers call the monolith of Mercury the ‘door to another world’, while others believe that it is one of the many evidence that points to the fact that millions of years ago and perhaps even before life on Earth,  an advanced alien civilization was created, that inhabited our solar system, leaving behind traces of their existence that we are beginning to find today. The massive “artificial structure” was recently analyzed by the researcher and YouTuber “SecureTeam10“,  who discusses and analyzes the” black rectangular structure “that is present in the images taken by NASA. A similar monolith can also be found on Mars and on one of its Phobos moons.

monolith-mercurio582 Nov 10/11/15

Curiously, astronaut Buzz Aldrin also said: “We must see better the moon of Mars (Phobos). On its surface there is a monolith, a very particular structure on this small potato-shaped object that revolves around Mars once every seven hours. So who put that thing on Phobos? Who put it? Well the universe put that object there, or if you choose … God put it there. ”

monolith-mercurio583 Nov 15-11-11

The mysterious structure seen on the surface of Mercury was first sighted in 2012, when researcher Scott Waring had analyzed it on his blog. However, the video uploaded to YouTube by Tyler Glockner, analyzes the mysterious structure in the shape of a monolith on the surface of Mercury: “I took an excellent image that became clear to me … that this is not an entrance open to everyone. In reality, it is something much more magnificent. It is a shadow … but where does the shadow come from? Dear friends, the rectangular object is a monolith structure with an imposing appearance above the surface. “

Many are convinced that the image presented by NASA actually describes a permanent structure on the surface of Mercury. Glockner believes that due to the inclination of the shadow from the Sun, you determine the black rectangle which is then actually a shadow of a permanent structure on the surface.

monolith-mercurio584 Nov 15-11-11

Monolith on Mars

According to data collected by the Messenger probe, Mercury is a planet subjected to high temperatures, but it also has water and organic material present on its surface. It is interesting to note that the amount of water on the planet is sufficient to cover Washington DC on ice. According to the scientists, it is believed that Mercury possesses its own dose of organic material, which when compared is similar to that which was present on our planet at the time of the creation of life, millions of years ago. Incredibly, this material, according to scientists, has been the building blocks of life.


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