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Stephen Hawking Predicted End of the Universe in New Research before Death

The mainstream media is reporting this. Stephen Hawking published a pretty significant research paper with predictions about the end of the universe, and the way scientists can detect other universes just a couple weeks before his passing.

Cambridge Professor Stephen Hawking of course passed away at the age of 76 on Wednesday. Up until his very last moments, he was publishing his opinion about the universe. A lot of science about the universe seems to be quite nihilist and dry, but Hawking had a way of presenting info that was both kind of characteristically scientist-like and spiritually compelling. As a spiritual person who believes in a kind of God, his theories are at least interesting and not necessarily incompatible with spirituality.

The co-author of Hawkings’ last paper, Thomas Hertog noted that if he were still alive Stephen “would have won a Nobel Prize” for the paper.

There is an issue that reportedly bothered Hawking for 35 years, and that’s what this paper addressed.

In 1983, Hawking developed a “no boundary theory” with James Hartle. In it, they detailed how they believe the Earth was created during the Big Bang. The theory presented in the paper proposes the existence of a “multiverse,” meaning that there was not one, but multiple “Big Bangs” creating different universes at the origin of our own universe.

Now in the final work of Hawking, he proposed that these other universes might even be detectable using a spaceship probe. It was a collaboration with Mr. Mertog, who is professor for theoretical physics at KU Leuven University in Belgium.

The paper is titled “A Smooth Exit from Eternal Inflation,” and it predicted the end of the universe by suggesting quite a nihilistic thing, that the universe would eventually become complete darkness as all the stars burn out. Hopefully some juggernaut of physics will save our universe and keep the cycle of energy and light going: afterall, where could all that energy go?

To the Sunday Times, Hertog said:

“He has often been nominated for the Nobel and should have won it. Now he never can.”

The paper is interesting because it proposes that the other universes in the proposed multiverse could leave an actual imprint on the background radiation that flows throughout our own universe.

Therefore, according to Hawking and his partner, a detector on a spaceship that measures background radiation could eventually identify the presence of other universes. Why they believe radiation from other universes could cross into ours, I’m not sure but it’s quite interesting.

A professor of cosmology at Durham University, Carlos Frenk agreed that little other possibility for measuring other universes has ever been presented.

She said:

“The intriguing idea in Hawking’s paper is that [the multiverse] left its imprint on the background radiation permeating our universe and we could measure it with a detector on a spaceship.”

If we discovered that several other universes exist, imagine how greatly that would change our understanding of the universe.

On the other hand, people should really be weary of “scientific dogma.” That is, a scientific belief with no actual verifiable evidence.

What if one extremely charismatic scientist proposed a theory that is compelling to the imagination, but the study they present is too complex to understand and people just believe it because they want to and it ends up being untrue?

(Image credit: news.nationalgeographic, metanerds)

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Space

India Blew up a Satellite. Now A “Space Fence” Is Tracking Its Debris

Explosive Demonstration

Last month, India demonstrated its capabilities as a spacefaring nation and drew international criticism when it used a missile to blew up one of its own satellites.

The launch happened to coincide with Lockheed Martin’s test run of a new space monitoring technology called the Space Fence, which can detect and track any unregistered objects orbiting the Earth. According to Space News, that was a stroke of luck that could mitigate damage to people and equipment in space.

Picket Fence

The satellite explosion essentially turned the satellite into a cloud of space debris, which could in the future collide with other satellites, scientific instruments, or astronauts in orbit around the Earth — remember “Gravity”?

“We happened to be up during an endurance test and we were very excited to see that the system performed nominally,” Matthew Hughes, Lockheed Martin business development manager, told Space News. “Space fence is all about the ability to identify break ups, maneuvers, closely spaced objects, proximity operations, new foreign launches.”

While Space Fence isn’t an actual blockade in space, it can at least help officials prepare for and plan around collisions.

READ MORE: Indian anti-satellite test proves early test for Space Fence [Space News]

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Gateway to HEAVEN? NASA Hubble Telescope finds amazing cross structure at centre of galaxy

AN incredible image of what appears to be a cross at the centre of the galaxy has sparked theories it’s the gateway to heaven.

The image was first released by the space agency in June 1992 – according to hubblesite.org – but has just reemerged on conspiracy website Disclose.tv.

FINDING: This cross structure has sparked theories of a gateway to heaven (Pic: NASA)

According to hubblesite.org, which first published the image, the cross is due to “absorption by dust and marks the exact position of a black hole”.

It is also 1,100 light-years away from Earth, the website reveals.

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It writes: “The darkest bar may be an edge-on dust ring which is 100 light-years in diameter.

“The edge-on torus not only hides the black hole and accretion disk from being viewed directly from Earth, but also determines the axis of a jet of high-speed plasma and confines radiation from the accretion disk to a pair of oppositely directed cones of light, which ionize gas caught in their beam.

DISCOVERY: The cross structure was found by NASA’s Hubble Telescope

“The second bar of the “X” could be a second disk seen edge on, or possibly rotating gas and dust in MS1 intersecting with the jets and ionization cones.”

The incredible find has sparked claims it could prove the existence of heaven.

One commenter wrote on Disclose.tv: “Wow I guess I’ve been wrong all these years!

“This is surely a sign that God exists and he is showing us that heaven resides with the very centre of our galaxy.”

Another wrote: “Interesting. I’d say X marks the spot, but it does look like a crucifix. In fact, it looks like a figure hanging off of a crucifix…”

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Second Interstellar Meteor Discovered and This One Hit the Earth

Move over, ‘Oumuamua … there’s a new interstellar object in town. Well, there was, according to Abraham (Avi) Loeb, the astronomer who will be forever linked to ‘Oumuamua because of his theory that the cigar-shaped, not-of-this-solar-system object might actually be artificially made – in other words, an interstellar spaceship or solar sail. Despite some ridicule, Harvard didn’t fire the chair of its Astronomy Department and Loeb went back to work … and has now discovered his own interstellar object which predates ‘Oumuamua. Avi, can you give this one a name that’s easier to spell and pronounce?

“I was very surprised. I didn’t expect that. I thought we will not see anything. But in retrospect, like any discovery, you say, Oh yeah, of course. How could I be so foolish not to look for that in the first place?”

“That” is — or was – a meteor that was reported over Manus Island in Papua New Guinea on January 8, 2014. In a paper that has been submitted to The Astrophysical Journal Letters, Loeb and Harvard undergraduate student Amir Siraj describe how they found the report while reviewing the Center for Near-Earth Object Studies’ catalog of meteor events for objects that had two key ingredients indicating they might be from another galaxy – speed and trajectory.

“We know the motion of the Earth [and] we correct for it—for the gravity of Earth, gravity of the sun, gravity of all the planets.”

Loeb told National Geographic that he and Siraj searched through 30 years of data and found one meteor that had the right combination of both. The meteor was traveling at almost 37 miles per second (134,200 mph or 216,000 km/h) when it disintegrated over Manus Island. That’s too fast to have been slingshot at Earth by a tight loop around the Sun or Jupiter or another planet in the way NASA gives space probes a boost in velocity, which means it was probably fired at us by another star. While there are no pictures of this meteor, the data in the CNEOS catalog indicated an unusual trajectory that, when coupled with its speed, indicated this was most likely an interstellar object that arrived three years before ‘Oumuamua.

“If we identified such a thing in real time, we could take a spectrum and figure out the composition.”

Unfortunately, this one burned up in the atmosphere due to its size — three feet across and weighing about 1,100 pounds. And no, it wasn’t cigar-shaped, so Loeb doesn’t think it was a spaceship. However, it could still have been carrying life forms.

“You can imagine that if these meteors were ejected from the habitable zone of a star, they could help transfer life from one planetary system to another.”

Panspermia! Loeb thinks most of these interstellar objects are much smaller than ‘Oumuamua (1 km long) and will disintegrate before impacting, but much could be learned by beefing up the NEO detection system to catch more of them as they burn up in the atmosphere so their spectrums can be analyzed for mineral content.

That’s not as exciting as finding an alien spaceship, but Avi Loeb seems well on his way to becoming the go-to astronomer for interstellar objects.

Source: Mysterious Universe

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