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Rokurokubi – Long Neck Japanese Legendary Ghosts

Rokurokubi which are related to Nure-onna are yokai found in Japanese folklore. They look like normal human beings by day, but at night they gain the ability to stretch their necks to great lengths. They can also change their faces to those of terrifying Oni to better scare mortals.

In their daytime human forms, rokurokubi often live undetected and may even take mortal spouses. Many rokurokubi become so accustomed to such a life that they take great pains to keep their demonic forms secret. They are tricksters by nature, however, and the urge to frighten and spy on human beings is hard to resist. Some rokurokubi thus resort to revealing themselves only to drunkards, fools, the sleeping, or the blind in order to satisfy these urges. Other rokurokubi have no such compunctions and go about frightening mortals with abandon. A few, it is said, are not even aware of their true nature and consider themselves normal humans. This last group stretch their necks out while asleep in an involuntary action; upon waking up in the morning, they find they have weird dreams regarding seeing their surroundings in unnatural angles.

According to some tales, rokurokubi were once normal human beings but were transformed by karma for breaking various precepts of Buddhism. Often, these rokurokubi are truly sinister in nature, eating people or drinking their blood rather than merely frightening them. These demonic rokurokubi often have a favored prey, such as others who have broken Buddhist doctrine or human men.

Tanuki often imitated rokurokubi when playing practical jokes on people. In a folktale collected for his book, Kwaidan by Lafcadio Hearn, the nukekubi is misidentified as rokurokubi, an error that also appears in the Fighting Fantasy book, Sword of the Samurai, and in Stephen Dedman’s novel The Art of Arrow-Cutting. The nukekubi is a similar but slightly different being from Japanese folklore belonging to the same overall class; instead of necks that stretch, the nukekubi have heads that completely detach. The book Even More Short & Shivery by Robert D. San Souci has a tale called Rokuro-kubi, but, again, the descriptions in the book are nukekubi, not rokurokubi.

Nearly five hundred years ago there was a samurai, named Isogai Heidazaemon Taketsura, in the service of the Lord Kikuji, of Kyushu. This Isogai had inherited, from many warlike ancestors, a natural aptitude for military exercises, and extraordinary strength. While yet a boy he had surpassed his teachers in the art of swordsmanship, in archery, and in the use of the spear, and had displayed all the capacities of a daring and skillful soldier. Afterwards, in the time of the Eikyo war, he so distinguished himself that high honors were bestowed upon him. But when the house of Kikuji came to ruin, Isogai found himself without a master. He might then easily have obtained service under another daimyo; but as he had never sought distinction for his own sake alone, and as his heart remained true to his former lord, he preferred to give up the world. so he cut off his hair, and became a traveling priest,–taking the Buddhist name of Kwairyo.

But always, under the koromo of the priest, Kwairyo kept warm within him the heart of the samurai. As in other years he had laughed at peril, so now also he scorned danger; and in all weathers and all seasons he journeyed to preach the good Law in places where no other priest would have dared to go. For that age was an age of violence and disorder; and upon the highways there was no security for the solitary traveler, even if he happened to be a priest.

In the course of his first long journey, Kwairyo had occasion to visit the province of Kai. One evening, as he was traveling through the mountains of that province, darkness overcame him in a very lonesome district, leagues away from any village. So he resigned himself to pass the night under the stars; and having found a suitable grassy spot, by the roadside, he lay down there, and prepared to sleep. He had always welcomed discomfort; and even a bare rock was for him a good bed, when nothing better could be found, and the root of a pine-tree an excellent pillow. His body was iron; and he never troubled himself about dews or rain or frost or snow. Scarcely had he lain down when a man came along the road, carrying an axe and a great bundle of chopped wood. This woodcutter halted on seeing Kwairyo lying down, and, after a moment of silent observation, said to him in a tone of great surprise:–

“What kind of a man can you be, good Sir, that you dare to lie down alone in such a place as this?… There are haunters about here,–many of them. are you not afraid of Hairy Things?”

“My friend,” cheerfully answered Kwairyo, “I am only a wandering priest,–a ‘Cloud-and-Water-Guest,’ as folks call it: Unsui-no-ryokaku. And I am not in the least afraid of Hairy Things,–if you mean goblin-foxes, or goblin-badgers, or any creatures of that kind. As for lonesome places, I like them: they are suitable for meditation. I am accustomed to sleeping in the open air: and I have learned never to be anxious aboutmy life.”
“You must be indeed a brave man, Sir Priest,” the peasant responded, “to lie down here! This place has a bad name,–a very bad name. But, as the proverb has it, Kunshi ayayuki ni chikayorazu [‘The superior man does not needlessly expose himself to peril’]; and I must assure you, Sir, that it is very dangerous to sleep here. Therefore, although my house is only a wretched thatched hut, let me beg of you to come home with me at once. In the way of food, I have nothing to offer you; but there is a roof at least, and you can sleep under it without risk.”

He spoke earnestly; and Kwairyo, liking the kindly tone of the man, accepted this modest offer. The woodcutter guided him along a narrow path, leading up from the main road through mountain-forest. It was a rough and dangerous path,–sometimes skirting precipices,–sometimes offering nothing but a network of slippery roots for the foot to rest upon,–sometimes winding over or between masses of jagged rock. But at last Kwairyo found himself upon a cleared space at the top of a hill, with a full moon shining overhead; and he saw before him a small thatched cottage, cheerfully lighted from within. The woodcutter led him to a shed at the back of the house, whither water had been conducted, through bamboo-pipes, from some neighboring stream; and the two men washed their feet. Beyond the shed was a vegetable garden, and a grove of cedars and bamboos; and beyond the trees appeared the glimmer of a cascade, pouring from some loftier height, and swaying in the moonshine like a long white robe.

As Kwairyo entered the cottage with his guide, he perceived four persons–men and women–warming their hands at a little fire kindled in the ro of the principle apartment. They bowed low to the priest, and greeted him in the most respectful manner. Kwairyo wondered that persons so poor, and dwelling in such a solitude, should be aware of the polite forms of greeting. “These are good people,” he thought to himself; “and they must have been taught by some one well acquainted with the rules of propriety.” Then turning to his host,–the aruji, or house-master, as the others called him,–Kwairyo said:–
“From the kindness of your speech, and from the very polite welcome given me by your household, I imagine that you have not always been a woodcutter. Perhaps you formerly belonged to one of the upper classes?”

Smiling, the woodcutter answered:–

“Sir, you are not mistaken. Though now living as you find me, I was once a person of some distinction. My story is the story of a ruined life–ruined by my own fault. I used to be in the service of a daimyo; and my rank in that service was not inconsiderable. But I loved women and wine too well; and under the influence of passion I acted wickedly. My selfishness brought about the ruin of our house, and caused the death of many persons. Retribution followed me; and I long remained a fugitive in the land. Now I often pray that I may be able to make some atonement for the evil which I did, and to reestablish the ancestral home. But I fear that I shall never find any way of so doing. Nevertheless, I try to overcome the karma of my errors by sincere repentance, and by helping as afar as I can, those who are unfortunate.”

Kwairyo was pleased by this announcement of good resolve; and he said to the aruji:–

“My friend, I have had occasion to observe that man, prone to folly in their youth, may in after years become very earnest in right living. In the holy sutras it is written that those strongest in wrong-doing can become, by power of good resolve, the strongest in right-doing. I do not doubt that you have a good heart; and I hope that better fortune will come to you. To-night I shall recite the sutras for your sake, and pray that you may obtain the force to overcome the karma of any past errors.”

rokurokubi

rokurokubi

With these assurances, Kwairyo bade the aruji good-night; and his host showed him to a very small side-room, where a bed had been made ready. Then all went to sleep except the priest, who began to read the sutras by the light of a paper lantern. Until a late hour he continued to read and pray: then he opened a little window in his little sleeping-room, to take a last look at the landscape before lying down. The night was beautiful: there was no cloud in the sky: there was no wind; and the strong moonlight threw down sharp black shadows of foliage, and glittered on the dews of the garden. Shrillings of crickets and bell-insects made a musical tumult; and the sound of the neighboring cascade deepened with the night. Kwairyo felt thirsty as he listened to the noise of the water; and, remembering the bamboo aqueduct at the rear of the house, he thought that he could go there and get a drink without disturbing the sleeping household. Very gently he pushed apart the sliding-screens that separated his room from the main apartment; and he saw, by the light of the lantern, five recumbent bodies–without heads!

For one instant he stood bewildered,–imagining a crime. But in another moment he perceived that there was no blood, and that the headless necks did not look as if they had been cut. Then he thought to himself:–“Either this is an illusion made by goblins, or I have been lured into the dwelling of a Rokuro-Kubi… (4) In the book Soshinki (5) it is written that if one find the body of a Rokuro-Kubi without its head, and remove the body to another place, the head will never be able to join itself again to the neck. And the book further says that when the head comes back and finds that its body has been moved, it will strike itself upon the floor three times,–bounding like a ball,–and will pant as in great fear, and presently die. Now, if these be Rokuro-Kubi, they mean me no good;–so I shall be justified in following the instructions of the book.”…

He seized the body of the aruji by the feet, pulled it to the window, and pushed it out. Then he went to the back-door, which he found barred; and he surmised that the heads had made their exit through the smoke-hole in the roof, which had been left open. Gently unbarring the door, he made his way to the garden, and proceeded with all possible caution to the grove beyond it. He heard voices talking in the grove; and he went in the direction of the voices,–stealing from shadow to shadow, until he reached a good hiding-place. Then, from behind a trunk, he caught sight of the heads,–all five of them,–flitting about, and chatting as they flitted. They were eating worms and insects which they found on the ground or among the trees. Presently the head of the aruji stopped eating and said:–

“Ah, that traveling priest who came to-night!–how fat all his body is! When we shall have eaten him, our bellies will be well filled… I was foolish to talk to him as I did;–it only set him to reciting the sutras on behalf of my soul! To go near him while he is reciting would be difficult; and we cannot touch him so long as he is praying. But as it is now nearly morning, perhaps he has gone to sleep… Some one of you go to the house and see what the fellow is doing.”

Another head–the head of a young woman–immediately rose up and flitted to the house, lightly as a bat. After a few minutes it came back, and cried out huskily, in a tone of great alarm:–

“That traveling priest is not in the house;–he is gone! But that is not the worst of the matter. He has taken the body of our aruji; and I do not know where he has put it.”

At this announcement the head of the aruji–distinctly visible in the moonlight–assumed a frightful aspect: its eyes opened monstrously; its hair stood up bristling; and its teeth gnashed. Then a cry burst from its lips; and–weeping tears of rage–it exclaimed:–

“Since my body has been moved, to rejoin it is not possible! Then I must die!… And all through the work of that priest! Before I die I will get at that priest!–I will tear him!–I will devour him!… AND THERE HE IS–behind that tree!–hiding behind that tree! See him !–the fat coward!”…

In the same moment the head of the aruji, followed by the other four heads, sprang at Kwairyo. But the strong priest had already armed himself by plucking up a young tree; and with that tree he struck the heads as they came,–knocking them from him with tremendous blows. Four of them fled away. But the head of the aruji, though battered again and again, desperately continued to bound at the priest, and at last caught him by the left sleeve of his robe. Kwairyo, however, as quickly gripped the head by its topknot, and repeatedly struck it. It did not release its hold; but it uttered a long moan, and thereafter ceased to struggle. It was dead. But its teeth still held the sleeve; and, for all his great strength, Kwairyo could not force open the jaws.

With the head still hanging to his sleeve he went back to the house, and there caught sight of the other four Rokuro-Kubi squatting together, with their bruised and bleeding heads reunited to their bodies. But when they perceived him at the back-door all screamed, “The priest! the priest!”–and fled, through the other doorway, out into the woods.

Eastward the sky was brightening; day was about to dawn; and Kwairyo knew that the power of the goblins was limited to the hours of darkness. He looked at the head clinging to his sleeve,–its face all fouled with blood and foam and clay; and he laughed aloud as he thought to himself: “What a miyage! [4]–the head of a goblin!” After which he gathered together his few belongings, and leisurely descended the mountain to continue his journey.

Right on he journeyed, until he came to Suwa in Shinano; (6) and into the main street of Suwa he solemnly strode, with the head dangling at his elbow. Then woman fainted, and children screamed and ran away; and there was a great crowding and clamoring until the torite (as the police in those days were called) seized the priest, and took him to jail. For they supposed the head to be the head of a murdered man who, in the moment of being killed, had caught the murderer’s sleeve in his teeth. As the Kwairyo, he only smiled and said nothing when they questioned him. So, after having passed a night in prison, he was brought before the magistrates of the district. Then he was ordered to explain how he, a priest, had been found with the head of a man fastened to his sleeve, and why he had dared thus shamelessly to parade his crime in the sight of people.

Kwairyo laughed long and loudly at these questions; and then he said:–

“Sirs, I did not fasten the head to my sleeve: it fastened itself there–much against my will. And I have not committed any crime. For this is not the head of a man; it is the head of a goblin;–and, if I caused the death of the goblin, I did not do so by any shedding of blood, but simply by taking the precautions necessary to assure my own safety.”… And he proceeded to relate the whole of the adventure,–bursting into another hearty laugh as he told of his encounter with the five heads.

But the magistrates did not laugh. They judged him to be a hardened criminal, and his story an insult to their intelligence. Therefore, without further questioning, they decided to order his immediate execution,–all of them except one, a very old man. This aged officer had made no remark during the trial; but, after having heard the opinion of his colleagues, he rose up, and said:–

“Let us first examine the head carefully; for this, I think, has not yet been done. If the priest has spoken truth, the head itself should bear witness for him… Bring the head here!”

So the head, still holding in its teeth the koromo that had been stripped from Kwairyo’s shoulders, was put before the judges. The old man turned it round and round, carefully examined it, and discovered, on the nape of its neck, several strange red characters. He called the attention of his colleagues to these, and also bad them observe that the edges of the neck nowhere presented the appearance of having been cut by any weapon. On the contrary, the line of leverance was smooth as the line at which a falling leaf detaches itself from the stem… Then said the elder:–

“I am quite sure that the priest told us nothing but the truth. This is the head of a Rokuro-Kubi. In the book Nan-ho-i-butsu-shi it is written that certain red characters can always be found upon the nape of the neck of a real Rokuro-Kubi. There are the characters: you can see for yourselves that they have not been painted. Moreover, it is well known that such goblins have been dwelling in the mountains of the province of Kai from very ancient time… But you, Sir,” he exclaimed, turning to Kwairyo,–“what sort of sturdy priest may you be? Certainly you have given proof of a courage that few priests possess; and you have the air of a soldier rather than a priest. Perhaps you once belonged to the samurai-class?”

“You have guessed rightly, Sir,” Kwairyo responded. “Before becoming a priest, I long followed the profession of arms; and in those days I never feared man or devil. My name then was Isogai Heidazaemon Taketsura of Kyushu: there may be some among you who remember it.” At the mention of that name, a murmur of admiration filled the court-room.; for there were many present who remembered it. And Kwairyo immediately found himself among friends instead of judges,–friends anxious to prove their admiration by fraternal kindness. With honor they escorted him to the residence of the daimyo, who welcomed him, and feasted him, and made him a handsome present before allowing him to depart. When Kwairyo left Suwa, he was as happy as any priest is permitted to be in this transitory world. As for the head, he took it with him,–jocosely insisting that he intended it for a miyage.

And now it only remains to tell what became of the head.

A day or two after leaving Suwa, Kwairyo met with a robber, who stopped him in a lonesome place, and bade him strip. Kwairyo at once removed his koromo, and offered it to the robber, who then first perceived what was hanging to the sleeve. Though brave, the highwayman was startled: he dropped the garment, and sprang back. Then he cried out:–“You!–what kind of a priest are you? Why, you are a worse man than I am! It is true that I have killed people; but I never walked about with anybody’s head fastened to my sleeve… Well, Sir priest, I suppose we are of the same calling; and I must say that I admire you!… Now that head would be of use to me: I could frighten people with it. Will you sell it? You can have my robe in exchange for your koromo; and I will give you five ryo for the head.”

Kwairyo answered:–“I shall let you have the head and the robe if you insist; but I must tell you that this is not the head of a man. It is a goblin’s head. So, if you buy it, and have any trouble in consequence, please to remember that you were not deceived by me.” “What a nice priest you are!” exclaimed the robber. “You kill men, and jest about it!… But I am really in earnest. Here is my robe; and here is the money;–and let me have the head… What is the use of joking?”

“Take the thing,” said Kwairyo. “I was not joking. The only joke–if there be any joke at all–is that you are fool enough to pay good money for a goblin’s head.” And Kwairyo, loudly laughing, went upon his way.

Thus the robber got the head and the koromo; and for some time he played goblin-priest upon the highways. But, reaching the neighborhood of Suwa, he there leaned the true story of the head; and he then became afraid that the spirit of the Rokuro-Kubi might give him trouble. So he made up his mind to take back the head to the place from which it had come, and to bury it with its body. He found his way to the lonely cottage in the mountains of Kai; but nobody was there, and he could not discover the body. Therefore he buried the head by itself, in the grove behind the cottage; and he had a tombstone set up over the grave; and he caused a Segaki-service to be performed on behalf of the spirit of the Rokuro-Kubi. And that tombstone–known as the Tombstone of the Rokuro-Kubi–may be seen (at least so the Japanese story-teller declares) even unto this day.

 Source

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Paranormal

Self Proclaimed ‘Time-traveller’ claiming to be from 2030 PASSED lie detector test –

A ‘time-traveller’ who says he is from the future has passed a lie detector test after claiming Donald Trump will be re-elected and Artificial Intelligence will take over.

In a startling YouTube video posted by Apex TV the man, whose face and voice have been distorted to hide his identity, claims he has risked his life to travel back in time.

Apex TV says it is ‘one of the biggest voices of paranormal content on YouTube’, with over 56 million views and 100,000 subscribers.

His mission, he says, is to tell those alive now what the world has in store.

Among his predictions is the claim that Google Glass-style robotics will spread across the globe.

Technology will also have developed to the point where it will be able to independently run a home.

Bitcoin will be increasingly popular but pennies and cents will still be in use.

In 2030 he says the US president is a mysterious figure called Ilana Remikee.

He also suggests global warming has caused temperatures in North America to increase while Europe has cooled.

Humans will reach Mars in 2028 and, the same year, time travel will be discovered.

He states that electric cars will be able to travel as fast as diesel and petrol ones (despite many already being able to do so) and many forms of cancer have been cured.

In a previous interview with Paranormal Elite, Noah said he had anorexia and is in fact 50-years-old, but that he had taken an age rejuvenation drug which had transformed him into a 25-year-old.

Of course, his claims have attracted scepticism. In response, he agreed to take a lie detector test on camera.

In the footage from ApexTV the would-be oracle is seen sitting on a chair with what appears to be a polygraph lie detector wrapped around his bicep.

He is asked to predict some of the future’s major events – and confirm he really is who he says he is.

The interview begins and Noah is asked a simple question: ‘Are you an actual time traveller from the year 2030?’

He responds with a yes and ‘TRUE’ appears in large green letters superimposed on the video. However, the results on the machine are not shown.

Noah then claims he has ‘hard evidence’ to back up his predictions but isn’t sure that he can say what that it because it might cause a paradox.

Once again, the word ‘TRUE’ appears on screen again.

Read More On This At:http://www.dailymail.co.uk/

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The Top 5 Scariest Places in the Philippines

Discover the top 5 scariest places in the Philippines and learn the truth about them. If you’re looking for spine-chilling places to explore while staying in the Philippines for vacation, then let me walk you through the top 5 scariest places in the Pearl of the Orient Seas.

Haunted places like streets, buildings, and houses usually have a rich history of bloody past. Most of the paranormal activities that are happening in these places came from morbid and tragic events in the old times. Some scary stories take root in legends and mythical characters that people talked about for many years.

In the Philippines, where history and culture mostly developed because of its rich antiquities during the war era and invasion period, many haunted places now were remnants of the past. While other spooky places were brought by tragic events from unfortunate accidents.

In this article, let me take you to the scariest places in the Philippines that will surely raise your curiosity if you’re into ghostly and eerie adventures. Check them out below.

List of Top 5 Scariest Places in the Philippines

Balete Drive

First on our list of top 5 scariest places in the Philippines is one of the most famous ghost area in Manila, the Balete Drive. Located in New Manila, Balete drive is said to be haunted by a white lady (a popular ghost in the Philippines, which means a female soul or spirit dressed in white. According to commuters and drivers specifically taxi drivers, at around 12 midnight and 3 am, a bloody white lady shows up to either ask for help or look for her murderer.

Back in the past, it was said that a female student was raped and murdered in Balete Drive. During those days, Balete trees surrounded Balete Drive. This is the main reason the street was called Balete Drive. The alleged murderer was said to be a taxi driver and according to the reports, that woman was buried under a Balete tree. In addition, according to folklore, Balete is housed with mysterious creatures and this contributes to the already haunted street of Balete Drive.

Clark Airbase Hospital

Hospitals are the common lounge of spirits and abandoned hospitals are even worse. In Angeles City, Pampanga, an abandoned hospital was featured in the horror documentary; “I wouldn’t Go in There” of National Geographic back in 2013 and this was the Clark Airbase Hospital. In the past, it was a refuge site to soldiers during World War II and the Vietnam War.

According to the Ghost Hunters International group, Clark Airbase Hospital was one of the most haunted places in the world because the spirits who are residing here are reported as violent and rude to visitors. Based on some personal accounts of explorers and paranormal investigators, spirits and the unknown threw rocks and other objects to them when they visited the place. Paranormal activities like screams, howls, and apparitions are also common in this hospital.

Pindangan Ruins

Third on our list of top 5 scariest places in the Philippines is the Pindangan ruins, in San Juan City, La Union. This place is the remnant of an old church that was built in 1786. In the past, it was a place for unity between two villages (San Vicente de Balanac Village and Guillermo de Dalagdang Village) under the protection of Father Jose Torres. Now, the place is full of spirits and the most popular spirit was said to be the headless stabbed priest who was allegedly seen searching and calling for his lost head.

Moreover, this place is also haunted by spirits that are called “Pasatsat” which comes from the word “satsat” that means, “to stab.” They were the people who died in World War II when coffin and graveyards were too expensive so people wrapped their dead in reed mats. According to locals, these spirits will haunt you and in order to stop them, you have to stab open their makeshift caskets and cut it in half.

Ozone Disco

One of the terrifying fire accidents in the Philippines took place in Ozone Disco in Quezon City. On March 18, 1996, a massive fire engulfed the small nightclub. The disco was approved for occupancy of only 35 people, but during that time, around 350 patrons and 40 club employees were said to be enjoying the night in the Ozone disco. Based on the accounts of the surviving victims, light sparked flying inside the disc’s jockey booth and shortly after that smoke followed and people thought it was just a party plan. To their horror, the electrical system shut down and flame erupted.

According to the court, 162 people died in the Ozone disco and most victims were graduating students from Universities. These days the disco is already an abandoned place but many ghostly sightings were reported within the area especially at night. Some locals said that they could hear music and see disco lights. Others claimed seeing silhouettes of dancing people and hearing screams and moaning. Moreover, families of the victims were occasionally seen in the place with spirit mediums to contact their dead loved ones. In one occasion, a spirit of a boy named “Ed” was contacted and according to the reports, he wanted to say goodbye to his family.

Diplomat Hotel

In the popular city of Pines, Baguio, there is this haunted place called the Diplomat Hotel or also known as Dominican Hill Retreat House. This structure was built in 1911 for the American Friars of the Dominican Order. It was originally constructed as a retreat house for relaxation, a monastery, and a school all-in-one. In the height of the World War II, the Japanese attacked the hotel and many people were ruthlessly killed. This includes ordinary children, priests, nuns, families and even babies.

The Diplomat Hotels, Inc., revived the place in 1973 and according to the staff of the hotel; the place is indeed haunted and scary. Years later, the owner died and the hotel stopped operating.

Many ghost sightings have been reported in the area. Some claimed that headless priests and nuns, who were victims of the World War II, haunt the Diplomat Hotel. Others heard moaning and crying of babies at night. Moreover, paranormal activities like the banging of doors, screaming people in pain and ghostly apparitions were said to occur in this haunted hotel.

If you’re brave enough to visit these places, then I suggest you don’t go alone. You may encounter bad spirits or ghosts that can harm you. Alternatively, If you’re scared and couldn’t imagine yourself traveling these scariest places, then I suggest you focus on exploring the wonders of the Philippines.

Interesting Links:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ozone_Disco_Club_fire

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clark_Air_Base

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_haunted_locations_in_the_Philippines

https://www.buzzfeed.com/isabellelaureta/haunted-places-philippines?utm_term=.stYMVQ1gm#.xcAaKXAVM

http://business.inquirer.net/238610/haunted-structures

https://philnews.ph/2017/10/31/top-10-terrifying-scariest-places-philippines/

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How Scientists Found “Paranormal Perception” Channels Within Human Beings

In 1976, a presentation was given at the Institute of Electrical & Electronics Engineers (IEEE) on a paper published by the Institute on behalf of Hal Puthoff (now part of the To The Stars initiative that received and released the recent UFO Pentagon footage) and Russell Targ.

The paper was titled “A Perceptual Channel For Information Transfer Over Kilometer Distances: Historical Perspectives and Recent Research.”

Puthoff, who held a PhD in electrical engineering from Stanford, at the time was commissioned by the CIA/DIA and Stanford Research Institute to direct the Stargate project, which was one of many secret government programs that remained hidden from public knowledge for more than 20 years.

Russell Targ is a physicist and author, originally known for his work pioneering the development of the laser and laser applications, and a co-founder of the Stanford Research Institute’s (SRI) investigation of psychic abilities in the 1970s and 1980s.

The Stargate Project examined human psychic abilities; today it’s known as the study of parapsychology.

The paper was the first and only publication of this program before it became classified in the late 70s, and it presented scientific evidence for the existence of a perceptual capacity channel whereby certain individuals are able to perceive and describe remote data not perceivable to any known sense.

In fact, by 1975 the funding clients had agreed that this subtle perception channel existed in both experienced and inexperienced individuals. (source, a lecture from Ingo Swann, one of 500 highly skilled participants within the program).

In the program, participants were able to successfully identify buildings, roads, and laboratory apparatus, but more than two decades later, parts of the program were declassified and we found out that it was much more than just that.

This is outlined in a statement made by Puthoff from a paper published after the declassification in 1995:

“To summarize, over the years, the back-and-forth criticism of protocols, refinement of methods, and successful replication of this type of remote viewing in independent laboratories has yielded considerable scientific evidence for the reality of the [remote viewing] phenomenon. Adding to the strength of these results was the discovery that a growing number of individuals could be found to demonstrate high-quality remote viewing, often to their own surprise. . . . The development of this capability at SRI has evolved to the point where visiting CIA personnel with no previous exposure to such concepts have performed well under controlled laboratory conditions.” (source)(source)

Participants in the program were able to remote view objects in other rooms, to buildings, and places all over the world.

For example, a Soviet Tu-22 bomber, one that was outfitted as a reconnaissance aircraft and lost in Zaire in 1979, was located by an Air Force remote viewer. President Jimmy Carter was aware of this, admitting to national press that the CIA, without his knowledge, once consulted a psychic to locate a missing government plane. According to CNN, he told students at Emory University that the “special U.S. plane” crashed somewhere in Zaire. The only thing is that it was a Russian, not American plan.

According to Carter, “the woman went into a trance and gave some latitude and longitude figures. We focused our satellite cameras on that point and the plane was there.”  (source)

According to Paul H. Smith, PhD, and one of the participants in the Stargate project (now a retired U.S. army major), gives us more detail from his book that is sourced below:

In March 1979, a young Air Force enlisted woman named Rosemary Smith was handed a map of the entire continent of Africa. She was told only that sometime in the past few days a Soviet Tu-22 bomber outfitted as a spy plane had crashed somewhere in the continent.  The United States desperately wanted to recover the top secret Russian codes and equipment the Tu-22 carried. Using their remote viewing skills, she pinpointed the wreckage, even though it had been completely swallowed by the jungle canopy into which the jet had plunged nose first. (source, pg. 31)

Another example would be the rings around Jupiter. Prior to the flyby of Jupiter by Pioneer 10, a spacecraft launched in 1972 and the first to fly directly through the asteroid belt and make observations of Jupiter, a gentleman by the name of Ingo Swann was able to successfully describe and view a ring around Jupiter, which scientists had no idea even existed. This took place precisely before NASA’s Pioneer 10 spacecraft flyby, which confirmed that the ring did actually exist. These results were published and they are linked earlier in this article.

“To determine whether it was necessary to have a ‘beacon’ individual at the target site, Swann suggested carrying out an experiment to remote view the planet Jupiter before the upcoming NASA Pioneer 10 flyby. In that case, much to his chagrin (and ours) he found a ring around Jupiter, and wondered if perhaps he had remote viewed Saturn by mistake. Our colleagues in astronomy were quite unimpressed as well, until the flyby revealed that an unanticipated ring did in fact exist.” (source)

Pretty fascinating, isn’t it? Swann went on to write about the Moon, and other strange factors that are associated with space that we have yet to become aware of.  You can access those books here.

The shutdown of the program was fishy. According to Ingo, human telepathy came into play and that’s when the men in suits walked in and shut the program down.

Below is one of many talks given by Russell Targ talking about the program more.

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