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Psi-Trailing: Animals’ Incredible Journeys

Sometime in August 1923. Bobbie, a large dog, two years old, mostly collie, but said to be part English sheep dog, began his incredible journey.

His family, the Braziers, were restaurant owners who were vacationing in a small Indiana town, far from their Silverton, Oregon home. They became separated. The family had to return home, leaving Bobbie in Indiana.

So, Bobbie traveled, alone, westward to reunite with his family. At first, he was trying to find his bearings, wandering in circles, as people do when they are lost, traveling miles, but only about a couple of hundred of them in the right direction. In late fall, he began to find the journey toward home.

He trekked through Illinois and Iowa. Sometimes, he caught his own dinner. Other times, people fed him and gave him shelter for a night or longer.

Hoboes shared their food with him. During Thanksgiving, a family took him in for several weeks. Then, it was time for him to move on.

He lost a lot of weight during his journey. He swam across rivers, including the Missouri, filled with ice. He crossed the Rocky Mountains.

Finally, in February, he reached home and entered the family restaurant. He went to the second floor living quarters where Frank Brazier was sleeping, jumped on the bed and licked Frank’s face. This ended the 3,000 mile six month long journey.

The president of the Oregon Humane Society authenticated this amazing feat. The route was reconstructed and people who saw or took care of Bobbie were interviewed.

Bobbie did not follow Frank’s east/west route and appeared to have traveled thousands of miles over land he had never been in, land he had not seen, smelled or, in any way was familiar, yet, he found his way home.

Joseph Banks Rhine, one of the fathers of modern parapsychology, and his daughter, Sara Feather, have studied many similar cases. Rhine called this phenomena psi-trailing. Psi is the abbreviation for psychic phenomena.

In 1952, he investigated a case of psi-trailing that happened in 1952. This was one of the longest journeys of a cat.

Stacy Woods was an Anderson, California school principal. Sugar was the family cat.

The family moved to a farm in Gage, Oklahoma and left the cat with neighbors because the cat was terrified of riding in cars.

About fourteen months later, Stacy and his wife were milking cows in the barn when a cat jumped through an open window and landed on Mrs. Woods’ shoulder. The cat looked and acted so much like Sugar that they joked their cat had found them. Then, they realized that the cat really was Sugar. The cat had an unusual bone deformity at his left hip joint.

Later, the Woods found out that Sugar disappeared three weeks after they moved.

Rhine learned that Sugar was a strong cat and an excellent hunter and had caught half-grown jack rabbits. The parapsychologist concluded that the cat was physically able to travel the rugged land between California and Oregon, a distance of 1500 miles.

The question was how did Sugar find his family in a place he had never been to?

Another unusual case that Rhine and Feather studied was one of a pigeon. This was not the case of the usual homing pigeon.

Hugh Brady Perkins was a boy when he discovered the pigeon in the yard of his home in Summersville, West Virginia. The year was 1940. He tamed the pigeon and placed a band on its leg with the number 167 on it.

That winter, Hugh was taken to a hospital, at night, for surgery. The distance was about 120 miles from home.

One night when it snowed, Hugh heard fluttering at the hospital window and told the nurse. She opened the window to humor the boy and the pigeon came in. There was the band with the number 167 on the bird’s leg.

How can animals travel such distances and, to places they have never been?

When cases are evaluated for psi-trailing, there are four major criteria that are used.

1) The reliability of the witnesses. 2) Positive identification of the animal, such as a deformity, scar or name tag. 3) How credible and consistent the details are. 4) Adequate corroborative evidence, such as other witnesses.

After years of study, Rhine and Feather found at least 54 cases of cats, dogs and birds that appeared to meet these criteria.

The evidence is there. Again, the question is how animals can do this.

I believe it is by telepathy. This is communication without the use of the traditional five senses, across space and time. This has been demonstrated in humans many times, both in experimental situations and in the field. A simple example is that a person is thinking about calling a friend. The phone rings and it is the friend.

I also believe that “connectedness” or special bonds existing between humans and humans, animals and animals and humans and animals facilitate this. Again, there has been evidence to support this.

Dr. Karlis Osis, a distinguished parapsychologist, did one of the earliest experiments in psychic communication with animals in the early 1950s at the Parapsychology Laboratory at Duke University.

Osis was experimenting with kittens in a T-shaped maze, trying to influence them to go right or left, according to a random sequence.

The cats made more turns, according to Osis’ will, than could be attributed to chance. He concluded that telepathy was probably the best explanation.

Even more intriguing was the fact that the cats that he had a special bond with were the ones that most often went in the direction he chose. The cat that “scored” the best was one that he allowed to jump on his shoulder and ride around the laboratory.

Transpersonal psychology studies human consciousness. There is also research being done in both animal consciousness and psychic animal-human communication. I believe that this, not space, is the last frontier.

Will Bradbury Will, ed. Into the Unknown. ISBN: 0-89577-098-9

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Paranormal

Singapore: meet father-son duo banishing demons for a prize

Anderson Lim clasped his hands tightly in a praying position as a spiritual medium made back and forth movements before him.

Lim then chanted indistinctly as the medium set a paper doll – known as a “substitute” – on fire.

The doll, dressed in a blue shirt that belonged to Lim’s brother, was part of a Taoist ritual performed to ward off bad luck.

” Recently [my brother] had a very bad fall. He missed a step and his ankle was severely fractured. He was hospitalized for two weeks, “said Lim, a 41-year-old businessman.

“I hope that after this ritual, he will be fine. I have seen too many things that cannot be explained, so there are some things that we have to believe. “

Like Lim, many Singaporeans in the modern city-state still turn to supernatural means, such as traditional spiritual mediums, for good luck, health, and prosperity.

While some of his clients seek feng shui advice for disagreements at home, others seek help when they are unlucky or have career issues, said Jeroen Chew , an exorcist and master of feng shui.

Chew joined unconventional commerce over a decade ago after hearing stories that his father Chew Hon Chin, better known as Grand Master Chew, changed the lives of many people around the world.

“My father showed me that non-Taoists and non-religious believed in him,” said Chew, 44. “When we went to the Philippines, there was a long line of people lining up to see him … And I thought to myself that this man can really do something to change people’s lives. “

For former Chew, joining the profession was more of a calling. He said he was cursed 16 years ago, and after coming out of the “spell”, it was time to help others.

“I was cursed for about 10 years. I couldn’t sleep or eat properly, my business failed and everyone thought I was crazy, “said the 72-year-old, who added that he had also attempted suicide.

“Nor did I believe in gods or spirits in the past, I only believed in myself. But one night I dreamed that someone told me that if I got out of the curse, I would need to help people the same way. “

He then created Ghostbuster.

Explaining how the name was born, young Chew said his father originally wanted to “catch ghosts,” but that the family business has since evolved to offer not only exorcism services, but also feng shui readings as well. as luck improvement and ancestral prayer services.

The company also offers ba zi reading, reading its date and time of birth, which would allow Chew to “warn customers” of things as if a conflict should arise with their superiors or their bosses.

” [The lectures] will tell them, “Today you are not in a good energy mood with your boss, you have to be careful,” said Chew, whose services are offered from 88 Australian dollars (65 US dollars).

“Some people don’t take us seriously. But like I said, we help those who want us to help. Those who don’t believe us are fine with us. “

Today, Ghostbuster has approximately 1,000 customers of different faiths. On larger events, such as the eighth day of the Lunar New Year, also known as the jade emperor’s birthday, attendance averages between 400 and 600 “followers.”

According to Chew, 70% of his clients are Christians, even if certain elements of his business are rooted in Taoism.

“We will never tell to you to change religion. We are here to solve your problem. If I solve your problem, I do something that makes you feel good, you feel better and you keep going with your life. You will not change anything, “he said.

Customers ranging from teens to those in their thirties are increasing, said Chew, representing about 60% of his clients.

Most of them ask for help when they face bad business prospects or problems with their family.

Chew added, “Some people feel that they are not reaching their maximum potential … and let’s help each client achieve the best they can in their career or family life. ”

Among those who turn to such supernatural means is Wilmer Ang, 30, who went to see a master several years ago “out of curiosity”. He later consulted with the master when he started his business and when he encountered problems at work.

“I will visit my master occasionally, either to ask for advice on my business or to love life,” said Ang, who works in the real estate industry.

He is said to carry certain objects, including precious stones, or to place “lucky charms” in his office to bring him prosperity.

Another believer, Max Tan, 35, first consulted a numerologist in his twenties. Then he thought it would be a “good idea to see what the future holds.”

During the consultation, he discovered that he had conflicting character traits and “slowly reconciled” with who he was.

Tan, who is a fashion designer, recently consulted his master again, who confirmed his decision to continue his studies.

Dhylan Boey, a professional metaphysician, who has been in the business for over 10 years, has suggested that the younger generation is more open to such practices because it has “fewer hangups” with taboos and conventions, compared to the older generation.

Boey, who specializes in numerology, crystal healing, tarot and feng shui readings, said, “My Generation Y or Generation Z clients are open to new things that may not be be validated by clinical sciences. ”

“On some level, they like to believe that some magic still exists in this world and that as young humans grappling with life problems, and discovering their purpose in life, they may also be doing part of this magic. “

Source: AsiaOne

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Unexplained Case Of Stone-Throwing Devil of New Castle Island

In 1682, stones battered George and Alice Walton’s home and crashed through windows in the living quarters above their tavern.

Hails of stones followed them into their fields. Richard Chamberlain, Secretary of the British Colony of New Hampshire, who was staying with the couple documented the events and coined the word, Lithobolia,a Greek-sounding one that translates as Stone-Throwing Devil.

He published a book about the seventeenth century poltergeist.

Stone-Throwing Devil Activity – Summer 1682

George was the stones’ target. There were up to one hundred of them in sessions and George was hit as many as forty times. Some were very hot, while some were icy cold.

Their size ranged from small pebbles to rocks as large as a human head. When people put them on a table, they disappeared and reappeared. The Waltons tried to repel the Stone-Throwing Devil by boiling crooked pins in a pot of urine. Twice, a stone hit the pot, spilling the liquid.

A gate from the Waltons’ house to neighbor Amazeen’s was tossed off if its hinges. A spit from the fireplace disappeared, then fell down the chimney and impaled itself into a log. A wheel of cheese was broken into pieces.

The drainage stopper in George’s boat vanished. Household items were tossed into the yard. Witnesses heard rocks rolling in the upstairs room, snorting, heavy breathing and sounds of distant hoofbeats.

Stone fall

Stone-Throwing Devil and Accusations of Witchcraft

The Waltons were considered wealthy property owners. Goody, a term used for women who didn’t have the status of being called missus, Hannah Jones was poor.

They both claimed ownership to a small field. Walton accused her of being a witch when she told him he should never enjoy that piece of land. She countered by accusing him of sorcery.

Some believed this event summoned the Stone-Throwing Devil.

Political Climate in New Castle Island

The islanders, two days before the stone throwing started, petitioned to separate from Portsmouth. It was denied. The heirs of John Mason, who was granted all of the land in New Hampshire, wanted their land returned or to collect taxes from all residents.

Chamberlain, the Waltons’ guest, was also the lawyer for the Masons. The Waltons were Masonian sympathizers and Quakers. Members of the sect were persecuted as those suspected of practicing witchcraft were.

Waltons’ household included servants an African man and an AmerIndian woman, in an era of great racial prejudice.

Stone-Throwing Devil’s Activity Ends

The poltergeist activity ended after Chamberlain returned to England. Two and a half years later, George Walton, who was seventy at the time, signed his property over to Alice and provided legacies to his children and grandchildren.

When he died in the following year, George still suffered from the wounds caused by the stones.

What was the Stone-Throwing Devil?

There were those who believed the stone tossing was caused by the devil. Increase and Cotton Mather, two powerful colonial New Englanders, wrote about the events that many believed were caused by witchcraft.

Cotton played a prominent role in the future Salem Massachusetts witch hysteria involving persecutions, accusations, trials and executions. No record can be found that indicates executions of anyone connected with the Stone-Throwing Devil.

Some islanders believed mischievous humans they dubbed the Boys at Work were the culprits. The Waltons had a houseful of grandchildren. The boys heard the snorting sounds; the girls, awakened by sounds of rolling rocks.

Both ran outside during the hails of stones. The problem with this theory is that stones pelted George in the children’s absence.

There is a phenomenon called the rock-throwing poltergeist that has been investigated and documented in modern times. Their activity is limited to stone tossing.

This is a manifestation of PK, psychokinesis, the ability of the mind to affect matter. The agent can be a human or an entity. There is a profile for human agents.

They experience unpleasant emotions such as frustration, anger and feelings of worthlessness, and test above average for PK. Emotions are repressed and released by subconscious PK. The activity may stop spontaneously or by psychotherapy.

By today’s standards, this case would be considered as trickery or a poltergeist, not the work of the devil.

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A chilling video shows La Llorona in a town in Colombia

La Llorona is a legendary figure with several incarnations. Generally known as ‘the woman who cries’, it is represented as a type of soul in sorrow: an appearance of a woman dressed in white, which appears in lakes or rivers, sometimes at road crossings, who cries at night for her lost children whom she killed. Her crime was committed in an attack of madness after learning that her lover or unfaithful husband left her to be with another woman of superior status. After realizing what he had done, he committed suicide.

It is described as a lost soul, condemned to wander the earth forever. For some, it is simply a fictional figure used by parents to scare children who misbehave. This popular history has been represented in several forms: in cinema, animation, art, poetry, theater, and literature aimed at both adults and children. The legend is deeply rooted in Mexican culture, but little by little it has been spreading throughout South America and certain parts of the United States. But the question we ask ourselves is: Is there evidence of its existence? Well, the answer to this question may be found in a video that has recently gone viral

‘La Llorona’ in Colombia

A video recently published on social networks shows what appears to be the silhouette of a “woman crying” on a tree in Colombia, which for many is the evidence that ‘La Llorona’ is much more than a legend. According to the South American media, the incident occurred in the Colombian municipality of Moñitos last month and became a viral phenomenon on social networks shortly after Christmas.

Although they have not offered many more details, all that is known is that the inhabitants of the small municipality are afraid to leave their homes due to the ghostly sighting. Specifically, it has been suggested that the entity in the video is clearly the terrifying figure of Latin American folklore known as ‘La Llorona’.

As we have commented previously, the legend says that this wandering spirit is that of a woman who was rejected by her husband and, in response, drowned her children and then committed suicide. He refused to “go to the other side” and now La Llorona roams the Earth in spirit form, killing anyone who has the bad luck of meeting her.

Like many similar videos that go viral, the opinions of Internet users about sighting in Colombia are divided. While some have found the scene quite scary, the most skeptical criticized the video by ensuring that it is a hoax. However, this is not the first time that the alleged Llorona has appeared in Colombia. In the middle of last year the inhabitants of La Esmeralda, in the Colombian municipality of Arauquita, heard a strange cry and shrieks past midnight. Like what happened in Monitors, nobody dared to leave his house to know what was happening.

A chilling video shows La Llorona in a town in Colombia

But several witnesses returning home heard a cry and were surprised at the figure of what appeared to be an elderly woman, extremely thin, with long black hair on her face and dressed in a white robe, walking slowly towards the cemetery of the town while crying inconsolably. The men decided to follow her and at one point, the strange woman stood at the grave of a small child. It was at that moment when the woman turned to the men and gave a loud shriek that made them run away from the place.

The truth is that the video is really scary, and if it’s fake, we don’t know how the real Llorona should be. Maybe it’s a ghost, or a mystical being or a demonic entity. Although we can not rule out that it is a strange creature that emits a disturbing sound.

What is your opinion about the video? Is it a real sighting of La Llorona or just a woman standing on a tree? Feel free to share your opinion below.

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