Connect with us

Fact or fiction

Is Bernie Sanders Really A Socialist? Does It Even Matter?

In November, 1985, MPP for Rainy River, Jack Pierce stood in the Ontario legislature before second reading of a bill he had introduced. His words are recorded in the Hansard (the official report of proceedings of Parliament):

My bill deals with the occurrences and documentation of severe side-effects which can result from the vaccination of infants and children. Some members may not be aware that the routine vaccination called DPT, diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus, given to almost every one of our children, can lead to convulsions, brain damage and even death.

Today, if an MPP dared to shine light on vaccine injury, he would be eviscerated by the media. Today, anyone who broaches the issue of vaccine safety has to contend with the likes of Carly Weeks. In her Feb. 2019 attack on the Total Health Show, Ms. Weeks singled out “anti-vaccine activists” who by telling others about vaccination risks spread “false information.” In her to-the-point article, she implies that only medical professionals are qualified to speak about vaccination. In other words: you will be vaccinated and have no right to voice an opinion about it.

If injured families had not spoken up in the 1980s, we would not have Pierce’s bill that became the Health Protection and Promotion Act (1990). This law requires vaccinators to inform vaccine recipients of possible adverse outcomes and of the obligation to report these events.

Pierce explained why he brought the bill:

As a member of the riding in which eight children are thought to have sufferedpermanent mental retardation and physical handicap as a result of this inoculation, Ifeel compelled to see that something is done about this nightmare.

I spoke with Jack Pierce, now in his 80s. He still lives in his old riding.  As an MPP in 1983, Pierce met with every member of parliament, one by one. He shared with each the need for a mandatory reporting of adverse reactions “so we can develop a complete and accurate picture of the benefits and risks of DPT.”

In 1985, MPPs could speak about vaccine injury without fear of reprisal from the media. Pierce continued:

While the diphtheria and tetanus components are mandatory and nonproblematic, the pertussis component, better known as whooping cough vaccine, has been responsible for severe reactions, including high fever, seizures, inflammation of the brain, permanent brain damage and sometimes death. Immunization against whooping cough is not mandatory. Parents have the right to refuse shots, and many are exercising this right.

… no one ever told him of the possibility of an adverse reaction to DPT

Pierce described the “heartbreaking stories of children who, despite the fact that they showed obvious adverse reactions to the pertussis vaccine, were given subsequent DPT shots.”

Patrick Rothwell of Burlington, Ontario, is six years old, blind, mentally retarded and speechless. His father said that no one ever told him of the possibility of an adverse reaction to DPT.

The Rothwell case is the lesson we failed to learn in Ontario.

In 1979, Patrick Rothwell received three doses of the whole cell DPT vaccine that caused him to regress. Patrick’s parents sued two doctors, the vaccine maker Connaught and the Crown alleging they had not been warned that the pertussis vaccine can cause brain damage.

Although 50 witnesses testified over 74 days at the 1988 trial their defeat was inevitable. The plaintiffs would never have been able to meet the burden of proof.

The presiding judge stated:

. . . the normal process of litigation is an utterly inappropriate procedure for dealing with claims of this nature. [Rothwell v. Raes (Ont. H.C.J.), 1988 CanLII 4636 (ON SC)]

In a review of the Rothwell case, the Manitoba Law Reform Commission agreed with the judge:

In practical terms, the tort process holds out very little promise for an efficient and fair remedy for those children who suffer vaccine-related injury and illness.

Pierce seemed to know that government needed to step in:

No one questions the need of a vaccine like DPT, but given the risks of paralysis, brain damage and death, the questions that might be addressed concern the levels of effort to find a safer drug and to make parents and doctors aware of the dangers and side-effects directly attributable to the vaccine. Where have the efforts been to make mandatory the reporting of adverse side-effects to the local medical officer of health?

Indeed.

At this point, after a trial and parliamentary debate with the passage of a law in 1990 to help reduce vaccine injuries, what interests kept the whole cell pertussis DPT vaccine in the schedule? Why were there still no warnings to parents of the risks?

… resulted in over 11,000 AEFI reports that described adverse reactions that included inconsolable screaming, head banging, seizures, anaphylaxis, paralysis and death. There was no follow-up on these children to determine long term injuries.

A familiar story.

In 1994, my son received three doses of the same Connaught DPT vaccine that Patrick Rothwell had received. Ours was mixed with two other vaccines. Use of this combination shot for 3 years resulted in over 11,000 AEFI reports that described adverse reactions that included inconsolable screaming, head banging, seizures, anaphylaxis, paralysis and death. There was no follow-up on these children to determine long term injuries.

Our story echoes those told by the Rainy River parents to Jack Pierce who then told the government. Like those parents, I had no real knowledge of vaccination when I took my son for his well baby visit and the nurse injected him. We were not warned of the documented risks before or after the procedure. Two laws intended to protect us were not observed: informed consent and Pierce’s health protection and promotion act.

An hour after vaccination, my two month old son began scream. He had never screamed before. I was terrified. And it continued for several hours. Through the night, I watched and listened. The next day, I called the GP who assured me that this was normal. I was persuaded by a medical professional to suppress my fears.

The second shot, two months later resulted in the same terrible reaction. And now, he had symptoms: rashes and he struggled to breathe through his nose.

His reaction to the third dose was violent.  He screamed and writhed in pain…

Nurses call this the neuro-scream, when the nervous system and brain are set on fire by the vaccine. And it changed him. The rhinitis and eczema that had developed I now know were red flags, precursors to life threatening allergies. He had his first anaphylactic reaction to peanut at 13 months. I have written extensively about the documented relationship between vaccination and allergy.

Meanwhile, the Ontario government continued to struggle with the issue of vaccine injury. In 1991, a bill was introduced by MPP Frankford, a physician, to compensate children and their families for vaccine-related injuries.

In the Hansard, MPP McLean agreed. The plan was “feasible” and “social conscience demands its enactment.”

The bill to compensate was quashed in 1991. Attempts to revive it have floundered in large measure on the altar of high cost. It is easier to download the costs to children and families. It is easier not to investigate, to deny injuries exist and ultimately block public access to AEFI reports if anyone tries to dig. (See note below.)

Fast forward to 2019.

The Canadian Medical Association has voted in favour of ending non-medical exemptions and making vaccination mandatory for Ontario children while at the same time voting against compensation for vaccine injuries.[9] As if on cue, the province amended its Immunization of School Pupils Act to withhold exemptions until a parent attends an education session designed to instill compliance. And anyone who tells parents of the documented risks, of the lack of consumer protections or speaks up on behalf of their own vaccine-injured children will be demonized as an “anti-vaxxer” who spreads “false information.”  In such a climate, it is not hyperbole to suggest that a law mandating the injection of children… will be followed by the same for adults.

And this dystopian reality — that Jack Pierce would have denounced — is something Ms. Weeks is paid to promote.

Note: We have an enormous deficit in information caused by a surveillance system that is passive, an under-reporting of adverse events and the fact that there is no follow-up on Adverse Events Following Immunization reports to determine long term injuries.  According to PHAC there were 115,837 AEFIs between 1987 and 2011 with 85% of them being children. If, as is generally recognized, this represents just 10% (some say it is 1%) of all adverse events, then we have upwards of one million events over 24 years about which we have no data.  In attempting to retrieve what information might be available to the public, I made an ATIP request in October 2016 for all AEFI reports (redacted) for the MMR II DIN#00466085 made by Merck Frosst Canada. This has still not been fulfilled. After lengthy email exchanges with various staffers at PHAC, I have had to conclude that either the records do not exist, they cannot access them or they are unwilling to send the redacted reports to me.

Source link

Advertisement
Comments

Fact or fiction

Japanese Ghostbuster Claims She Removes Spirits with an Air Cleaner

If there’s something strange in your neighborhood
Who you gonna call?

If that excerpt from a classic movie theme has you googling for the number of your nearest Ghostbuster, you may want to change a few letters and try again after reading what a Tweeter in Japan has to say about the ghost removal powers of her new Plasmacluster. A what?

When I first moved into the apartment I’m living in now, there were a lot of strange happenings that really freaked me out. But then I got a (Sharp) Plasmacluster air purifier, and it all completely stopped. I did some research on ghosts, and I found out that ghosts are kind of like plasma. Isn’t it amazing that air purifiers can not only clean the air but also exorcise ghosts?
Shiunoko
@ shinukosan

That Tweet from Shiunoko (@shinukosan) caught the attention of Japan’s Sharp Corporation, which makes the Plasmacluster air purifier and it quickly responded to Shiunoko, who offered some marketing advice (poor Google translation):

SHARP Sharp Corporation
@ SHARP_JP
Since I have not verified it, I can not affirm, but I can not repel. maybe.

@ shinukosan
Jun 11
Mr. Sharp, if the sales of the air purifier has grown a little, take a filter behind the air purifier. My guy seems full of spirits …!

SHARP Sharp Corporation
@ SHARP_JP
Jun 11
Sharp does not need to be replaced for 10 years

Would the Ghostbusters (or any spirit mediums) agree that a filter full of ghosts doesn’t need to be changed for 10 years? Sounds like a good movie plot but poor advice. The Twitter comments run the credibility gamut, but Sora News 24 points out that the Sharp Plasmacluster releases a plasma discharge full of plus and minus ions which clean the air by suppressing airborne mold particles, viruses, and allergens. Perhaps Shiunoko has confused ‘plasma’ with ‘ectoplasm’ – the alleged physical substance that allows ghosts to manifest themselves. However, the Plasmacluster isn’t removing plasma or ectoplasm — it’s emitting it.

It’s more likely Shiunoko is thinking of a study conducted in 2015 which speculated that the mold found in old houses (and aren’t most haunted houses old, musty and moldy?) could cause hallucinations (remember, the ergot fungus was used in the initial development of lysergic acid diethylamide – LSD) that give the breathers the sense they’re not alone and can possibly create the ghostly images in their minds. According to its ads, the Sharp Plasmacluster can definitely do that:

“Reduce germs, bacteria, viruses, mold, and fungus – Patented Plasmacluster Ion technology attacks impurities throughout the room”

We may need to order two.

Is Sharp missing a big and growing market for a Plasmacluster Ghostbuster? In the meantime, have some holy water handy when you change the filter.

If you’re seeing things running through your head
Who you gonna call?
Plasmabusters!

An invisible man
Sleeping in your bed
Who you gonna call? Plasmabusters!

I ain’t afraid of no ghost
I ain’t afraid of no ghost

Source: Mysterious Universe

Continue Reading

Fact or fiction

Reptilian like creature recorded in the drainage of Great Britain (Video)

An immense amount of legends that circulate for many years mention strange forms of life that live under the Earth. However, these legends usually stay on the Internet, and do not leave there … except for exceptions.

Reptilian recorded

There are stories of beings that come from a dark hell and possibly are among us since ancient times, which is why one of the most controversial videos in the history of YouTube is, without a doubt, which shows a strange creature of Reptilian aspect filmed in a British drain, video that many theorists have used to confirm the theories that these life forms do live among us.

The most terrifying thing is that it is not a single video, or two, but four recordings that were published on the YouTube platform. Another important point to note is that it was not hung by some ufologist, or by some UFO hunter that, normally, they do not have much credibility.

Those responsible for uploading the recordings was a company, which is responsible for water in the United Kingdom called United Utilities, on March 31, 2011. The next day, the news about the strange events recorded by the company was in every corner of the planet.

Many conspiracy theorists, both in personal blogs and forums, began to discuss and analyze the images, assuring that it was some reptilian creature. Others, however, mentioned some kind of lost animal, even that it was a montage. But what would a wastewater company gain from doing such a setup?

The Leigh Journal media was the first formal source to collect the images and review them, taking statements from the workers and people in charge of the company.

Mike Wood, regional manager of the sewer system at United Utilities, said that several of the employees had reported sightings of some strange animal, so they began to review the entire network of pipes with closed circuit monitoring. But what was seen was not exactly a sewer rat.

Wood explained at that time that the images were uploaded to YouTube, hoping that the general public would help them discover what it was, because they also had the theory that it could be an exotic pet that had gone astray, either from home from someone or from a zoo.

What they did have insurance is that it was feeding on the deposits of fat that were accumulating inside the pipes.

However, as the videos gained more and more reach, the theory that it could be a reptilian creature began to take much more strength among the public, and those who had been interested in the event.

In the images that were uploaded to YouTube you can see a strange creature with a long tail and body very similar to that of a reptile that crosses with the robot camera that the company had used to monitor the pipe network in case some of the the drains have some object stuck or there are nests of rats or other animals.

The event became so popular that even people baptized the creature, calling it “Messie”, alluding to the renowned monster of Loch Ness.

However, despite the fact that the first videos were quite … curious, none caused such impact and concern on the entire planet as the fourth video, where you can see the creature in front of the camera, showing long limbs, like legs and arms, with a clear humanoid aspect.

However, when the robot camera moves to focus it better, it retreats at high speed through the drain.

Still no explanation about the event, the company never declared that it was an advertising campaign or something like that and the media did not give more coverage to the topic What was that creature?

Continue Reading

Fact or fiction

Image of Jesus Seen in Flames Engulfing Notre Dame Cathedral

The whole world was devastated at the sight of the old Notre Dame Cathedral engulfed in flame.

While some brave souls worked to save relics and put out the fire and most of the rest of the world lamented the loss of French culture, history, and architecture—a few people claimed that a photo of the fire showed Jesus Christ in the middle of the flames.

While most of the whole world only saw a massive fire destroying one of Paris’ most prized and famous buildings, when one witness looked at the photo the same day, she was astounded by what she saw: a vivid image of Jesus. A few others agreed.

Those who saw and believed wondered: what message was Jesus trying to send to His believers with this manifestation? Was he reclaiming the Cathedral? Protecting it? Criticizing the mostly secular French government that had resisted authorizing the funds necessary to preserve the historic site?

Lesley Rowan, a 38-year old Scots woman told the Daily Record that when she concentrated on a photograph posted on Facebook, she saw a silhouette of Jesus against the burning building. She says so did some other people to whom she showed the photo, including her brother in Australia.

Some have uncharitably questioned Rowan’s soundness of mind but, despite the criticisms, she has stood by her convictions: She is 100% sure it’s the Prince of Peace. She also feels the purpose of the photo and the image of Jesus is to bring needed comfort to the people of Paris and the world.

Other people who have seen the photos were also convinced that what they saw was Jesus’ divine image in the middle of the flame. For them, the message here is similar: Jesus is saving the world from sin, or Jesus came back to cleanse the world of hate, judgment, anger, poverty, or even from something as specific as addiction—heroin vs. fentanyl, which is worse?

There was numerous opinion on the message behind the image.

Many of these believers took to Twitter to express their agreement.

Twitter user KellySchuberth said that she saw the image, too. She was amazed by it, too, but sought reassurance that it wasn’t just her mind playing tricks on her. Other Twitter accounts retweeted the photo, such as Otoide Joshua Mario and Catholic Doors.

Not that there weren’t skeptics, too, such as ThrillMonger, who ridiculed the idea, maybe even some who argued which drug the viewers were on at the time—heroin vs. fentanyl—to see such hallucinations. Others just decently suggested they were mistaken.

According to psychologist Kang Lee of the University of Toronto, our brains are hardwired to recognize faces in patterns at the slightest hint of facial feature. This phenomenon is known as pareidolia.

Other people see all manner of “subliminal” images where there are none. It doesn’t make you crazy or suggest you need your vision checked. Maybe you just have a strong imagination or a creative bent.

Even if there’s nothing divine (or nefarious) in the photograph, there’s no harm in perceiving purposeful imagery. If it brings comfort or reinforces faith, some good may come from calamity.

*This is a guest post written by Patrick Bailey. Professional Writer. http://patrickbaileys.com/

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending