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How the 40-year-old mystery of a UFO in New Zealand lives on

It was New Year’s Day, 1979, when the world woke to the news that strange lights had been spotted by six people on a plane off the New Zealand’s South Island.

Was it a UFO? No, said the sceptics. It was Venus, it was squid boats, it was radar returns from a field of cabbages.

But 40 years later, the two pilots and four passengers are adamant it was none of the above and are frustrated at being unable to find answers.

New Zealand’s The Herald on Sunday tracked down each member of the group around the world. One is a mango farmer in Hawaii, while another is an 80-year-old newlywed after her royal wedding-themed ceremony at her retirement village the night before Meghan and Harry’s big day.

The case bought instant fame — but no fortune — for some, before bringing shame and anger when they were accused of hoaxing the sighting. It broke up a marriage.

Guido Valentich holds a photograph of his son Frederick, a pilot who went missing while on a flight to King Island in a Cessna in October 1978. Picture: Popperfoto/Getty Source:Getty Images

At the end of 1978, Australasia was in the grip of UFO fever. In October, 20-year-old Frederick Valentich disappeared while piloting a small Cessna 182 aircraft over Bass Strait while heading to King Island in Tasmania. Described as a “flying saucer enthusiast”, Valentich informed Melbourne air traffic control he was being accompanied by an unknown aircraft.Two months later across the Tasman, on December 21, Safe Air pilots Vern Powell and Ian Pirie spotted strange lights while flying from Blenheim to Christchurch.

A producer for Melbourne’s Channel 0 (now Channel 10), Leonard Lee heard the news and tracked down reporter Quentin Fogarty, who worked for the channel but was on holiday with his wife and children in Christchurch, staying at TV Onejournalist Dennis Grant’s home.

Quentin Fogarty presenting the news in 1979 after the sighting. Picture: File Source:NZ Herald

Freelance Wellington cameraman David Crockett was also hired, along with his wife Ngaire, who operated the audiotape recorder.

The group were invited to jump aboard Safe Air’s Blenheim-based Argosy plane, named Merchant Enterprise, late on December 30, which pilots Bill Startup and Bob Guard were taking on a newspaper run between Wellington and Christchurch.

Shortly after takeoff, the pilots noticed strange lights appearing and disappearing over the Kaikōura coastline about 30 kilometres west.

“While we were filming a stand-up to camera, Captain Bill Startup shouted to us that we should go to the flight deck immediately as something was happening again,” says David Crockett.

He managed to film a rapidly moving, bright white light.

Bob Guard, left, and Bill Startup in 1979. Picture: Paul Davidson Source:NZ Herald

“With the conversation coming through my headphones from the pilots and radar from Wellington, it all started to get very scary,” says Ngaire Crockett.

“I was able to stand up a couple of times and was able to see these bright light coming and going. [Quentin] was a real mess and grabbed hold of both my hands and started shaking. I didn’t have time to worry about myself, I had to help him.”

The plane landed at Christchurch to unload newspapers and the pilots asked the news team if they wanted to go back through the area they had traversed. Ngaire was too frightened so stayed in Christchurch. The others reboarded the plane with Dennis Grant in Ngaire’s place.

“David had used up all the film in his 16mm camera,” Grant says.

“Quentin called me sometime after midnight from Christchurch Airport to see if I could provide a fresh roll of film. I could — but there was a catch — I wanted to get on the plane for the flight to Blenheim.”

The “UFO”, captured by cameraman David Crockett in New Zealand.Source:News Corp Australia

The plane took off at 2.16am. About three minutes after takeoff, the group saw a bright, round light to the right. The aeroplane radar showed a target in the same direction about 18 nautical miles.

Fogarty would later be heard saying on camera: “Let’s hope they’re friendly.”

Crockett filmed the light for several minutes as it appeared to travel along with the plane.

When they turned toward it, the light seemed to react by moving away from the aeroplane.

“The experience itself was extraordinary,” Fogarty says.

“Just being on the cramped, noisy flight deck of the Argosy barrelling down the coast in the dead of the night was exciting. Factor in a row of pulsating, hypnotic lights hovering outside the window, and it goes to another level.”

After landing at Woodbourne Airport at about 3am, the group stayed at the two pilots homes in Blenheim.

Startup’s daughter Tracy Moore remembers her father coming home in the middle of the night.

A copy of the New Zealand Herald from January 3, 1979.Source:NZ Herald

This was the copy of the Herald on January 4, 1979. Source:NZ Herald

“Everyone was at our house talking about it in the middle of the night. They were talking about lights, unexplained radar.

“At one point, I remember dad saying it might be a good idea to report it to the police. It was during the Cold War, there was a bit of paranoia around. Mum said: ‘You can’t sit on this information’.

“It was scary at the time. It was a big unknown thing that had happened and we had all the adults around discussing it. There were certainly no jokes being made.”

Fogarty interviewed the pilots before flying to Melbourne to give the recordings to Channel 0. The footage featured on prime time news that night and a longer documentary piece screened later.

The news went around the world and was featured by major news media, including by the Herald and by CBS anchorman Walter Cronkite.

Bruce Maccabee, pictured in 1979, examined footage of the supposed UFO. Source:NZ Herald

The sceptical reaction was immediate. Explanations included that it was Venus, drug runners, light reflected from cabbages or squid boats.

The Robert Muldoon Government ordered an inquiry by the Air Force, which concluded that the sightings could be explained by natural but unusual phenomena.

Leonard Lee travelled to the US to give the film to Bruce Maccabee, an optical physicist who specialised in laser technology and worked for the US Navy in Maryland, Virginia. He was also flown to New Zealand and Melbourne to interview witnesses.

He concluded the event involved unknown objects or phenomena fitting the definition of UFOs.

“One would think that the conclusion that several of the sightings involved unidentified objects flying with impunity in the New Zealand air space would have been sufficient to start an even deeper study of the UFOs,” Maccabee says.

Maccabee pictured recently. Source:NZ Herald

“But it wasn’t. The sightings were relegated to the dustbin of history, forgotten by all except the witnesses and a few ufologists who discussed the various sighting events for years afterward.”

He says that 39 years after the Kaikōura footage emerged, in December 2017, major media carried reports of UFO sightings by US Navy personnel during training exercises.

He says they involved multiple witnesses and multiple sources of information such as battleship radar at sea level, radar in the Navy jet aeroplanes, visible and infra-red video cameras in the aeroplanes.

But the incident appears to have been forgotten.

“History appears to be repeating itself.”

WHERE ARE THEY NOW?

The Herald on Sunday caught up with the pilots and passengers.

Journalist Quentin Fogarty, 72

After his world scoop, Dunedin-born Quentin Fogarty suffered from “nervous exhaustion” and ended up in hospital for a couple of weeks.

Quentin Fogarty. Picture: Paul Davidson Source:NZ Herald

“The level of initial scepticism both surprised and, at times, overwhelmed me. I certainly did not expect to be accused of hoaxing the whole thing. That cut deep, it still does.

“The local daily tabloid in Melbourne branded me as the ‘UFO Reporter’, and that stuck for a short time, but it did not take long for me to be back in my role as a TV journalist reporting on more mundane matters.”

Fogarty, a father of four who still lives in Melbourne, says he endeavoured to report the story as accurately and as impartially as he could.

“We had film, our own eyewitness accounts and confirmation from the flight crew and air traffic controllers that we had stumbled into something astonishing.

Fogarty, who started his career at Dunedin’s Evening Star wrote a book about the experience in 1982, Let’s Hope They’re Friendly, and remains convinced that enhanced computer analysis of the film might get closer to finding answers.

“Forty years down the track, this is still unfinished business.”

Pilot Bill Startup, 85

Startup now lives in a rest home in Blenheim. He had a stroke a three years after the incident and had to retire from flying.

He wrote a book the following year, The Kaikōura UFOs, his daughter says, to clear up the misinformation doing the rounds. The same year, Startup then took his wife Shirley and children to visit Bruce Maccabee in the US.

Bill Startup in 1978. Source:NZ Herald

Shirley, who died in 2012, was interviewed in 2008 and said a psychiatrist had thought the men had lost their faith in God and were seeing angels.

Startup, who was not well enough to be interviewed by the Herald on Sunday, told a documentary in 2009: “What it was all those years ago … I wish I knew. People can think what they want but they were not in the aircraft.”

Startup did not dwell on the experience, Moore says.

“Over the years there has been periodic interest, so he was being visited every one to two years from reporters all over. But he didn’t bring it up.”

She didn’t get the impression he truly believed it was UFO.

“He’d seen something that he did not know what it was, and his colleagues couldn’t come up with an explanation. He had no thoughts that he ever communicated to us.”

Co-pilot Bob Guard, 73

Guard has never said too much about the strange lights.

“One of the issues for me is we were just doing our job. We suddenly had to justify ourselves. We didn’t know what the hell it was.

Bob Guard in 1978. Source:NZ Herald

Bob Guard recounting his experience in Paul Davidson's documentary The Kaikoura UFOs. Picture: Paul Davidson

Bob Guard recounting his experience in Paul Davidson’s documentary The Kaikoura UFOs. Picture: Paul Davidson Source:NZ Herald

“We didn’t expect to see anything. It was a bit tense as it got closer to the aircraft.”

“I got over it. Have I ever seen anything like that again? No I haven’t. Do I believe in UFOs? No I don’t. Pilots see a lot of unidentified flying things.

“Would I tell anyone if I saw anything like that again? No I wouldn’t. It’s not worth the hassle.”

Research followed the sightings but he says “some were a sham — they used newspaper articles for their research”.

Guard stopped working for Safe Air in 1990 and went on to work at Air Nelson. He was the flight operations manager when he retired, aged 65, in 2010.

His children and grandchildren were aware of the story but it is not “something that has taken over their lives”.

Sound recorder Ngaire Crockett, 80

The Crocketts, who had five children, separated soon after the incident.

Ngaire is now Ngaire Gilmore after her new marriage to husband Ray Gilmore.

Ngaire Crocket in the 1970s. Source:NZ Herald

Ngaire Gilmore at her home in Palmerston North. Picture: Alexander Robertson Source:NZ Herald

The pair, who met during a blind date eight years ago, married in a surprise ceremony at the Julia Wallace Retirement Village in Palmerston North the day before Meghan and Harry’s nuptials this year.

Residents dressed up in royal wedding theme for happy hour but didn’t know they were attending a real wedding.

“Has this film changed my life?” asks Gilmore.

“I guess it did. We had phone call after phone call and people knocking on our door. David and the reporter became so obsessed that the doco was all they talked about. I switched off as we had five children and it was effecting all our lives.”

Cameraman David Crockett, 85

David Crockett dealt with health a handful of effects after filming the strange objects.

“To this very day, the incident has never left my mind. I am also reminded of the event by people who come up to me and say, ‘I saw you the other night on the Discovery or Science Channel’.

David Crockett in 1978. Source:NZ Herald

David Crockett. Picture: SuppliedSource:NZ Herald“The effect this historic sighting has had on all of us has certainly included a fair amount of stress. As for me, I was sleepless for several nights, and after having performed several overseas lectures on this sighting, became quite depressed.

Crockett, who now lives in Hawaii where he worked as a mango farmer, made a documentary about the incident, and gave lectures, which took him around the world. He is hoping to make a new documentary to mark the 40-year anniversary.

“It substantially changed my life. At that time in the history of the UFO phenomena, sceptics thought we were crazy, and criticised us in many ways. In 1978, most persons would not seriously consider that these were real object and may even originate from other planets.”

TV journalist Dennis Grant, 66

Over the years Grant has amassed a massive collection of a newspaper and magazine stories. He’s scoured official records in Australia and New Zealand and lodged official information applications for long-forgotten files.

Dennis Grant. Source:NZ Herald

“The results are overwhelmingly unhelpful in explaining the lights and what they were doing in the lonely summer skies of New Zealand. Forty years on I’m still very curious.

“My grandkids love to hear the story of my brush with UFOs, I just wish I could provide an ending.”

Grant was working at TV One (now TVNZ 1) in Christchurch in 1978 and now lives in Australia.

“I was a young journalist back then, fired with the zeal of telling stories untold, and I helped tell this story. But the rest of the world, the scientists, the officials, the military and — saddest of all for me — the media, were all consumed with indifference. Incurious.”

So does he believe in UFOs?

“I am entirely sceptical of the notion of little green men, Martian anal probes and all the rest of it. I note that the number of UFO sightings has greatly diminished since video and digital cameras and phone cameras have became readily available. However, what we saw that night over Kaikōura was unidentified and still is.”

The Argosy

The decommissioned Argosy now sits on land near the Marlborough Airport owned by Blenheim filmmaker Paul Davidson.

He purchased the aircraft in 1991 after hearing it was to be scrapped, telling the Safe Air general manager he would pay what he would have got from the scrap dealer.

Paul Davidson, of Blenheim, with his Argosy aircraft. Picture: Tim Cuff Source:NZ Herald

The aircraft had special meaning to him — in 2009, Davidson made a documentary, featuring interviews with the pilots and crew from 1978.

Davidson, whose home is on land adjacent to the aircraft, has restored and refurbished the aircraft and runs flight simulation experiences, complete with in-flight movies telling the story of Safe Air — and meals.

Passengers can dine at the Argosy Cafe, next to the plane, which acts as a terminal where they can collect their boarding passes and go to their gate for the experience. There is also memorabilia on display.

“We put it back together and tidied it up. It’s unique to Marlborough.”

Paul Davidson, of Blenheim, with his Argosy aircraft. Picture: Tim Cuff Source:NZ Herald

From Thursday, to coincide with the first strange sighting, Davidson will be running a UFO-themed experience.

His documentary will be screened, lights will be dimmed on-board and a “spooky atmosphere” created.

“People can sit in actual seat Captain Startup sat in.

“It’s the only place in the world where you can do that.”

So, does Davidson believe in UFOs?

“I believe in the possibility of them.

“I got to know both pilots with my documentary. They got sick of people saying ‘It was probably the lights of cars, or lights of squid boats’. These were professional pilots. ‘We know what Venus looks like, this was not Venus’.

“Everyone on board has said the event had a traumatic effect on their lives.”

• The accounts were pulled together with the help of Bruce Maccabee.

Source www.news.com.au

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Mysteries

A large underwater observatory in Baltic Sea mysteriously disappears without a trace

A large monitoring station used to collect important scientific data in the observatory in Baltic Sea mysteriously disappears.

The underwater observatory, which had been at the bottom of the sea since December 2016, is managed by the GEOMAR Helmholtz Center for Kiel Ocean Research and the Helmholtz Geesthacht Center (HZG). On August 21 at 8:15 p.m. local time, broadcasts from the 300,000-euro station suddenly stopped. The divers were sent to the site, only to discover, to their surprise, that the entire structure had disappeared, except for a shredded transmission cable, according to a GEOMAR statement.(observatory in Baltic Sea mysteriously disappears)

observatory in Baltic Sea  mysteriously disappears

The observatory was in a restricted area off the north coast of Germany. Ships, including fishing vessels, are not allowed in the area, the BBC reported. That someone, or a group of individuals, has removed the observatory remains the most plausible explanation. Other factors, such as a massive storm, strong currents or even marine animals, were ruled out as potential causes due to the weight of the instrument. Who or what eliminated the scientific station, and why, is a complete mystery. German police were alerted to the incident and are now investigating, according to GEOMAR.

The Boknis Eck Observatory is, or at least was, located at the exit of Eckernförde Bay, which is north of Kiel, Germany, and south of the Danish border. It was 1.8 kilometers from the coast, planted at a depth of 22 meters, the BBC reported.

The station collected data on water temperature, nutrients, salinity, water flow rate and chlorophyll and methane concentrations. These data are used to assess the health of the ecosystem in and around the southwest of the Baltic Sea. By monitoring these changes, scientists can be alerted to possible problems and take the required countermeasures. Scientists have been collecting data in the bay since the 1950s. The observatory is also used in the COSYNA (Coastal Observation System for the North and Arctic Seas) network of the HZG.

” [At the beginning] we thought of a transmission error, ” said Hermann Bange, project coordinator for the Boknis Eck Observatory, in the GEOMAR statement. This caused a dive mission to the site, revealing the disappearance. ” The devices were gone, divers could no longer find them, ” he said. “ When the divers reached the bottom of the sea last week at the observatory location, they only found the ground wire torn off. I was completely crushed . ”

The lost observatory consists of two racks, one weighing 250 kilograms and the other 100 kilograms each. The racks include a frame that supports the power supply (along with a heavy cable that connects the station to the coast) and a frame to hold the sensors. Both racks were “removed with great force from their position,” according to the GEOMAR statement.

Bange described the data collected by the observatory as “frankly invaluable.” GEOMAR and HZA conducted their own search for the lost station, but without luck. Scientists are now asking for help from the public, asking anyone to know something about the incident that arises.

The disappearance is reminiscent of sunken naval ships that are also disappearing from the ocean floor. In those cases, it is suspected that the looters tore the boats to discard them. Something similar may be happening here, although it is not clear what value this monitoring station, equipped with a variety of scientific instruments, could have for looters.

Or, it could be the result of an infamous military operation carried out by an unknown state actor, but that is pure speculation. Hopefully, more details will emerge about this strange story in the coming days and weeks.

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Mysteries

Oregon cattle killings, mutilations alarm ranchers

© Silvies Valley Ranch/David Zaitz Photography

Diana Kruzman
Oregon Live

Silvies Valley Ranch is a 140,000-acre property in Oregon’s largest county, where cattle outnumber people 14-to-1.

When the first dead bull turned up at the end of July, it didn’t raise an alarm at the Silvies Valley Ranch.

Cattle sometimes die suddenly on the ranch’s 140,000 acres in Harney County — struck by disease or felled by a broken leg and unable to find a way out of the rugged, forested terrain.

But by the time ranch hands discovered four more dead bulls within 24 hours, they knew they were likely dealing with deliberate, premeditated killings.

They’re still baffled by the circumstances. There were no wounds. No signs of a struggle. And the bulls’ genitals and tongues had been carefully removed.

The killing and mutilation of the 4 and 5-year-old Hereford bulls in the prime of their productive lives has since spurred a multi-agency investigation in eastern Oregon, but detectives have turned up no leads and haven’t yet even settled on a cause of death.

“How somebody put these bulls on the ground at what would be arguably a fairly close range — and to do it in a way that didn’t leave any signs, no trace evidence, no footprints, no struggle marks from the animal, no broken limbs — I have no idea,” said Colby Marshall, vice president of the Silvies Valley Ranch.

The mystery deepens because there’s no obvious reason someone would want those animal parts. They aren’t prime targets for black market sales, authorities said.

The deaths are eerily similar to a rash of livestock killings and mutilations across the West in the 1970s, when hundreds of cows and bulls turned up dead, also of seemingly unknown causes and with their genitals and tongues missing.

Back then, theories ran the gamut from a government conspiracy and UFOs to natural deaths and scavengers. Today, the circumstances at Silvies Valley Ranch point to humans as the probable culprits because of the precise cuts on the bulls.

Anything else for now is speculation, including ideas of what might have killed a bull without leaving marks. Marshall said he wonders if the killer used poison darts.

“We think that these are very sick and dangerous individuals and they need to answer for this horrible crime,” he said.

Silvies Valley Ranch, about 40 minutes north of the county seat of Burns, has put up a $25,000 reward for information on the bull killings that leads to an arrest and conviction, and the Oregon Cattlemen’s Association has offered its own $1,000 reward.

The investigation has pulled in Oregon State Police as well as the U.S. Forest Service because the cattle were grazing on a federal allotment in the Malheur National Forest.

The ranch is owned by veterinarian Scott Campbell, who bought the enterprise in 2006. Since then, it’s expanded into tourism with a golf course and resort on site, but still maintains around 4,500 head of beef cattle, including around 100 bulls.

The five dead bulls were found on July 30 and 31, in a wooded area about 15 miles from U.S. 395, the nearest major road. They were each about a quarter mile apart, and the first two weren’t found until several days after they had been killed — but Marshall believes the last three were discovered within 24 to 48 hours of their deaths.

The delay in finding the animals is not unusual in such a remote area, where ranchers are tasked with patrolling large tracts of land, said Jerome Rosa, executive director of the Oregon Cattlemen’s Association. Harney County is Oregon’s largest county, covering more than 10,000 square miles where cattle outnumber people 14-to-1.

“These are huge, vast, steep landscapes with lots of rock and trees and brush,” Rosa said. “Ranchers may not see their cattle for long stretches of time.”

Beef is Oregon’s largest agricultural commodity, drawing in nearly $1 billion a year – and most cattle crimes typically involve theft, Rosa said.

This makes the deaths at Silvies Valley Ranch particularly bizarre, he said, because the bulls were worth a lot of money alive, particularly for breeding.

Marshall estimated their value at up to $7,000 apiece and said they would have sired at least 100 calves each over the remainder of their lives.

“Their productive life was a huge economic opportunity for the ranch, and now that’s completely lost,” he said. “We’re talking hundreds of thousands of dollars.”

Dead Bull

© Silvies Valley Ranch
The five dead bulls were found on July 30 and 31, in a wooded area about 15 miles from U.S. 395, the nearest major road. Their genitals and tongues had been cleanly removed.

Marshall has heard from several other Oregon ranchers who reported similar killings on their property over the past few decades — including cows that had been found with their udders, vulvas and tongues removed.

One of these ranchers, Terry Anderson, found a dead cow on land he was renting near Pendleton in 1980. Its udder had been cleanly removed and Anderson could see no clear evidence of what had killed the animal.

“There was no visible bullet hole or anything there,” Anderson recalled this week. “It was so unusual. It just left you with an eerie feeling.”

The hundreds of cattle deaths in the 1970s — largely concentrated in the Midwest — caused a media sensation as ranchers roiled by an economic crisis blamed a government conspiracy, according to Michael Goleman, a history professor at Somerset Community College in Kentucky who researched the phenomenon.

Because the killings were scattered across different states, investigators reached no overarching conclusion on the cause of the deaths, but Goleman said some people believed the government was conducting weapons tests on the cattle.

Facing pressure from ranchers, the FBI opened an investigation in 1979 into the deaths of 15 cattle in New Mexico, ultimately concluding that there was no evidence of intentional mutilation by humans and the animals had likely died of natural causes.

Since then, scattered reports have made headlines, including the discovery of several mutilated cows in Kansas in 2016 and five cows in 1990 that had been killed and dissected on a farm in Washington. Goleman said conspiracy theorists have pinned the blame on everything from satanic cults to aliens.

But Silvies Valley Ranch isn’t placing its bets on paranormal activity, though Harney County Sheriff’s Deputy Dan Jenkins said he’s gotten a few suggestions that Sasquatch may be responsible. He’s received around 20 calls from around the western U.S. since news about the deaths started spreading.

Jenkins, the lead investigator on the case, said the lack of physical evidence at the crime sites — no footprints, no tire or ATV tracks — means authorities are relying on witnesses to call in to the tip line and report any suspicious activity they might have seen in the area.

David Bohnert, a professor at Oregon State University who studies beef cattle, said two things typically kill livestock: poisoning from eating toxic plants and people.

In this case, poisoning is unlikely, given the number of bulls involved and the plants in the area, he said. Larkspur typically flowers earlier in the year, while hemlock, another deadly plant, grows only around rivers and streams — not the dry forests where the bulls were found.

Plus, the fact that all five cattle killed were bulls, Bohnert said, is statistically unlikely to occur in nature — they make up only about 4% to 6% of a herd.

That leaves human activity as the most likely cause, he said. Adding to the evidence is the surgical precision with which the genitals and tongues were removed. Scavengers would leave obvious signs of tearing with teeth, claws or beaks, he said.

Bohnert said he has heard rumors of bull testicles being considered an aphrodisiac, and both tongues and genitals can be eaten — the famous “Rocky Mountain Oysters” come to mind. But he could think of no reason why someone couldn’t just legally buy the animal parts.

Yet the human explanation comes with its own difficulties.

Taking down a 2,000-pound bull is no easy feat, and Marshall said there were no signs of a struggle — the bulls were all lying on their sides as if they had just fallen over and died.

He said he could only think that some kind of toxic dart might kill a bull from a distance. But he has no proof of it and may never find it. It’s not clear if a dart would leave a detectable imprint.

In the meantime, tissue samples taken from the carcasses are still being analyzed for toxins and no results are available yet, Marshall said. Even with the tests, the killings may remain an enigma. The bulls had been left to decompose for several days, making a toxicology screen difficult to do, he said.

Until a suspect is found, ranch employees are on high alert, particularly those who patrol vast areas alone on ATV or on horseback.

Rosa said the news had also concerned other ranchers — but that greater awareness could also lead to faster answers in the tight-knit ranching community.

“The neighbors and the folks that are in those areas know each other,” Rosa said. “And when there’s someone strange or different that’s out and about, they take notice of that, and they let each other know.”

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Mysteries

Researcher Discovers Giant ‘Alien Face’ in Antarctica

While looking at images of Antarctica on Google Earth, a researcher noticed what appeared to be a mountain-sized face that resembles an alien.

According to coasttocoast the weird find came to light on August 20th when it was posted on the Instagram account ‘ufo_scandinavia.’

Alien Face Antarctica (2)

This alien face discovery brings to mind the ‘face on Mars’ which was first photographed by the Viking 1 in 1976, just a random coincidence?

Alien face Antarctica Face on Mars

Coordinates on Google Earth: 72°00’36″S 168°34’53″E

Referenced from UfoSightingsHotSpot

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