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Halloween 2020 is expected to have a full moon that hasn’t been seen since World War II

Halloween 2020 is expected to have a full moon that hasn't been seen since World War II 1

Astronomers claim that the full moon on October 31 will be visible throughout the world with the exception of parts of Australia.

In 2020, the world’s population is waiting for a very unusual phenomenon that will be seen in almost all corners of the planet as reported by Cnet.

According to experts, this year on Halloween (October 31), the full moon will rise and will be visible to the whole world. Such an event will happen for the first time since the Second World War.

Astronomy expert Geoffrey Hunt says the last full moon seen on the entire planet occurred in 1944. He notes that there was also a full moon on Halloween in 1955, but was not visible to residents of western North America and the western Pacific.

In the same year, residents of North and South America, India, all of Europe and most of Asia will see the full moon for the holiday. Also, the full moon will be visible in Western Australia, but not in the central and eastern parts of the country.

Scientists remind that in its full phase the moon will be visible to the naked eye, but for high-quality images, you still have to use additional equipment.

“Photos of the moon with a smartphone are likely to be substandard. A telephoto lens will help you capture the moon in all its glory. Adjust the camera brightness so details are visible and not drowned out by the brightness of the moon,” Hunt says.

He also emphasizes that the next full moon, which will be visible from all corners of the planet, will not happen soon – in 2039.

“Of course, in the coming years, the full moon will be in October, but not on Halloween,” the expert notes.

A full moon on Halloween is a rare coincidence. We will be able to enjoy it very soon.

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