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Mysteries

Gloomy Sunday – The Urban Legend of MOST dangerous Suicide Song

In December, 1932, a down and out Hungarian named Reszo Seress was trying to make a living as a songwriter in Paris, but kept failing miserably. All of his compositions failed to impress the music publishers of France, but Seress carried on chasing his dream nevertheless. He was determined to become an internationally famous songwriter. His girlfriend had constant rows with him over the insecurity of his ambitious life. She urged him to get a full-time 9 to 5 job, but Seress was uncompromising. He told her he was to be a songwriter or a hobo, and that was that.

One afternoon, things finally came to a head. Seress and his fiancée had a fierce row over his utter failure as a composer, and the couple parted with angry words.

On the day after the row – which happened to be a Sunday – Seress sat at the piano in his apartment, gazing morosely through the window at the Parisian skyline. Outside, storm-clouds gathered in the grey sky, and soon the heavy rain began to pelt down.

“What a gloomy Sunday” Seress said to himself as he played about on the piano’s ivories, and quite suddenly, his hands began to play a strange melancholy melody that seemed to encapsulate the downhearted way he was feeling over his quarrel with his girl and the state of the dispiriting weather.

“Yes, Gloomy Sunday! That will be the title of my new song” muttered Seress, excitedly, and he grabbed a pencil and wrote the notes down on an old postcard. Thirty minutes later he had completed the song.

Seress sent his composition off to a music publisher and waited for acceptance with a lot more hope than he usually had in his heart. A few days later, the song-sheet was returned with a rejection note stapled to it that stated: “Gloomy Sunday has a weird but highly depressing melody and rhythm, and we are sorry to say that we cannot use it.” The song was sent off again to another publisher, and this time it was accepted. The music publisher told Seress that his song would soon be distributed to all the major cities of the world. The young Hungarian was ecstatic.

But a few months after Gloomy Sunday was printed, there were a spate of strange occurrences that were allegedly sparked off by the new song. In Berlin, a young man requested a band to play Gloomy Sunday, and after the number was performed, the man went home and blasted himself in the head with a revolver after complaining to relatives that he felt severely depressed by the melody of a new song which he couldn’t get out of his head. That song was Gloomy Sunday.

A week later in the same city, a young female shop assistant was found hanging from a rope in her flat. Police who investigated the suicide found a copy of the sheet-music to Gloomy Sunday in the dead girl’s bedroom.

Two days after that tragedy, a young secretary in New York gassed herself, and in a suicide note she requested Gloomy Sunday to be played at her funeral. Weeks later, another New Yorker, aged 82, jumped to his death from the window of his seventh-story apartment after playing the ‘deadly’ song on his piano. Around the same time, a teenager in Rome who had heard the unlucky tune jumped off a bridge to his death.

The newspapers of the world were quick to report other deaths associated with Seress’ song. One newspaper covered the case of a woman in North London who had been playing a 78 recording of Gloomy Sunday at full volume, infuriating and frightening her neighbors, who had read of the fatalities supposedly caused by the tune. The stylus finally became trapped in a groove, and the same piece of the song played over and over. The neighbors hammered on the woman’s door but there was no answer, so they forced the door open – only to find the woman dead in her chair from an overdose of barbiturates. As the months went by, a steady stream of bizarre and disturbing deaths that were alleged to be connected to Gloomy Sunday persuaded the chiefs at the BBC to ban the seemingly accursed song from the airwaves. Back in France, Rizzo Seress, the man who had composed the controversial song, was also to experience the adverse effects of his creation. He wrote to his ex-fiancée, pleading for a reconciliation. But several days later came the most awful, shocking news. Seress learned from the police that his sweetheart had poisoned herself. And by her side, a copy of the sheet music to Gloomy Sunday was found.

At the end of the 1930s, when the world was plunged into the war against Hitler, Seress’ inauspicious song was quickly forgotten in the global turmoil, but the sheet-music to the dreaded song is still available (on the Net too) to those who are curious to know if the morbid melody can still exert its deadly influence…


[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Qaa4GDBr0k]
It is said that you will commit suicide right after listening to the “overture to death”. Hundreds of people (including the composer and his wife), commited suicide right after listening to this song, for some strange reason. It is said that you will hear a subliminal message deep in this song. This song, unlike the others, is the ORIGINAL 

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Kkxbw3s2pM]It starts in 1933 when Hungarian composer Rezso Seress broke up with his girlfriend on a Sunday. In utter despair he pens ‘Gloomy Sunday.’ The first publisher rejects his song as too depressing. The second commits suicide. But the third sees the potential and publishes ‘Gloomy Sunday’ throughout Europe.
People start dying immediately. In Berlin a man shot himself after telling relatives he couldn’t get that damn song out of his head. In Rome, an errand boy heard a beggar humming the tune, got off his bike, gave the beggar all his money and jumped from the nearest bridge. In one year alone in Hungary seventeen suicides were found with notes quoting the ‘Gloomy Sunday’ lyrics.
Of course sceptics dismiss these claims as anecdotal, quoting the rather strange fact that Hungary was so well known for its high suicide rate that seventeen people found dead in one year clutching the lyrics to a song was ‘par for the course.’
In 1936 the song reached New York and was marketed as ‘The Hungarian Suicide Song.’ Within a week a typist had gassed herself, requesting ‘Gloomy Sunday’ be played at her funeral.
As the death toll mounted, a third verse was added to the song. A happy verse that was intended to counter the depressive urges of the first two. A verse that said: wait, it was all a dream, she’s not dead, there’s no reason to commit suicide and, look, the sun’s coming out!
It didn’t work. The power of ‘Gloomy Sunday’ wasn’t confined to the lyrics. It was the dirge-like melody. As the BBC found out when they banned ‘Gloomy Sunday’ but allowed an instrumental version. A recording was made and released on a 78. Which caused panic in North London when a woman kept playing the record over and over. Neighbours banged on her doors, the police were called, the door forced open and … she was found dead inside – of an overdose.
With the BBC, the US and France all banning the song, another attempt to rehabilitate ‘Gloomy Sunday’ came in 1978 when English psychologist, Sir Edmund Hendricks, suggested an alternative third verse. Sir Edmund was a controversial figure in the world of psychology and a strong proponent of stiff upper lips and ‘tough love.’ His third verse went along the lines of: pull yourself together! You think Sunday’s bad wait until Monday and you have to go back to work!
This re-released version sparked the infamous ‘I don’t like Mondays’ California school shootings.
So, urban legend or frightening fact? The jury, what’s left of them after four hung themselves, is still out.
But judge for yourself. Here’s a short sample of the song and here, below, are the English lyrics as translated by Sam Lewis.
Sunday is gloomy, my hours are slumberless Dearest the shadows I live with are numberless Little white flowers will never awaken you Not where the black coach of sorrow has taken you Angels have no thought of ever returning you Would they be angry if I thought of joining you?
Gloomy Sunday
Gloomy is Sunday, with shadows I spend it all My heart and I have decided to end it all Soon there’ll be candles and prayers that are sad I know Let them not weep let them know that I’m glad to go Death is no dream for in death I’m caressing you With the last breath of my soul I’ll be blessing you
Gloomy Sunday

Singers who have recorded this song include Billie Holiday, Ray Charles, Bjork, Sarah McLachlan and Elvis Costello. Some are still alive. Not composer Rezso Seress however. In 1968, you guessed it, he committed suicide. 

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Mysteries

NASA has photographed a UFO in Antarctica

This new discovery is undoubtedly of great global impact for those who believe in the existence of UFOs and Extraterrestrials on our planet. The image of NASA depicting a UFO on the Antarctic continent was published on Google Earth. Antarctica has constantly aroused many mysteries, from the entrance to the Hollow Earth to the discovery of alien bases and the discovery of pyramid structures.

Even so, today all its secrets are hidden, although it begins to reveal some clues that amaze geologists, archaeologists, scientists, popularizers and even great personalities of the world. Whatever the mysteries of Antarctica, they will have to be discovered little by little. Who is not fascinated by the secrets of the most arid, windy and cold continent in the world? What is the truth about this unexplored and frozen continent? In the images provided by Google Earth we can see a silver circular object that has nothing to do with the rest of the surface.

It is clearly an artificial object and very similar to the classic flying saucer. This discovery was made by Argentine researcher Marcelo Irazusta and published by Sandra Andrade on her YouTube channel. This new discovery is undoubtedly of great global impact for those who maintain the existence of UFOs on our planet. The image is from NASA published on Google Earth. With this new discovery no doubt, it is of great global impact for those of us who believe in UFOs and extraterrestrials on our planet. We know that they discovered internal structures similar to the ruins of a technologically advanced ancient civilization, and it was also leaked that some frozen bodies of non-human beings appeared.

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Mysteries

The Mystery of the Taman Shud Case

The mystery of the Taman Shud case has puzzled law enforcement and intelligence agencies all over the world for more than half a century now.

Also referred to as “The Mystery of the Somerton Man”, this unsolved case refers to an incident that took place on December 1, 1948 where and unidentified male body was found dead at 6:30 a.m. on the shore of Somerton Beach in Adelaide, Australia.

Police found his body after a handful of various witnesses reported what they suspected was a man who was either drunk or asleep, reclining on the sand with his head resting against the seawall.

He was clothed in fine European attire, but all of the labels had been deliberately torn off from his clothing, indicating a possible attempt to conceal his identity. His dental records did not match any known individual in Australia.

Police searched his pockets in an attempt to find some type of identification, but to no avail; their search only produced a redeemed bus ticket, an unused second-class railway ticket, a half-empty pack of Juicy Fruit gum, some cigarettes, and a partially empty box of matches.

After several unsuccessful attempts to confirm the man’s identity and potential cause of death, police turned to an autopsy.

According to Sir John Burton Cleland, a noted University of Adelaide pathologist, the man’s body had all of the signs of a death by poisoning, including severe congestion in the liver, kidneys and brain.

The man’s spleen was enlarged about three times the normal size, and a significant amount of blood was located in his stomach as well.

Interestingly enough, several toxicology experts attempted to determine what type of poison was used, but it was completely undetectable in his body.

Authorities ruled the death a suicide by an unknown poisonous substance, but after a careful re-examination of the body by Sir Cleland, a small rolled-up piece of paper was discovered deep within a small fob pocket inside of the deceased man’s trouser pocket.

The paper contained the words “Taman Shud” (meaning “ending”, “finished” or “the end” in Persian) printed on it, and the reverse side was blank.

Public library officials were able to determine that the phrase came from the text of a collection of poems known as The Rubaiyat by Persian philosopher Omar Khayyam.

Police conducted a widespread campaign to find the book that the text was torn from, circulating images of the piece of paper in the press all over Australia.

A man whose identity has been kept anonymous by the police came forward and revealed that he had discovered a very rare copy of The Rubaiyat in the backseat of his parked, unlocked car on Jetty Road in Genelg about two weeks prior to the discovery of the body.

The man said that he had no idea that the book had any connection to the case until he read about it in the newspaper.

The book was missing the phrase “Taman Shud” on the very last page, and microscopic tests confirmed that the small piece of paper found in the Somerton man’s trouser pocket was indeed torn from the final page of the book.

Five lines of all-capital letters were scrawled in pencil in the very back of the book, delineating what authorities have ruled as some type of code.

Investigators first conjectured that the lines represented a foreign language, but that was later ruled out in favor of some type of cipher or cryptographic message. The five lines are as follows:

WRGOABABD

MLIAOI (this second line was struck through in the original message, indicating a possible mistake due to its similarity to line 4)

WTBIMPANETP

MLIABOAIAQC

ITTMTSAMSTGAB

A phone number was also written in the back of the book, which police later discovered belonged to a woman who resided on Moseley Street in Glenelg, only about a quarter of a mile from the location where the body was discovered. (Side note: Glenelg was also the destination listed on the bus ticket found in the Somerton man’s pocket.)

After being questioned by police, she stated that she did own a copy of The Rubaiyat during the time when she worked as a nurse at the Royal North Shore Hospital (in Sidney) during the second World War, but that she had given her copy to an Australian Army lieutenant named Alfred Boxall in 1945.

Police were now certain that the dead man could be identified as Alfred Boxall, until the real Alfred Boxall surfaced later with a different copy of The Rubaiyat (a 1942 edition), with the last page containing the phase “Taman Shud” intact!

The woman and did not claim to have any connection to the dead man discovered at Somerton beach. She asked to remain anonymous since she was newly married with a toddler, and did not want to be associated with a murder mystery or Boxall.

Amazingly, the police agreed to grant her anonymity, although she was considered to be the best lead in the case.

To this day, the identity of the Somerton man has not yet been confirmed, and the meaning of the cipher (if any) has not been determined.

Many have speculated that the mysterious man may have been some type of spy since his death occurred during a particularly intense period of the Cold War.

Several intelligence specialists, cryptanalysts, mathematicians and astrologers have attempted to decipher the code, but no one has been successful as of yet.

Perhaps the enigma of the Taman Shud case will never be solved, but it still carries an air of mystery and intrigue that fascinates people all over the world.

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Mysteries

The Mercury Monolith is proof that an Extraterrestrial Civilization inhabited the Solar System

It seems that Mars is not the only planet in our solar system that hosts mysterious monoliths. According to the images recorded by space probes, relative to the surface of Mercury, the “fire” planet is added to the list of planets and moons of our solar system, which show fascinating anomalies, which according to many, show that there is alien life, or at least it existed up to a certain point, in our solar system.

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Many researchers call the monolith of Mercury the ‘door to another world’, while others believe that it is one of the many evidence that points to the fact that millions of years ago and perhaps even before life on Earth,  an advanced alien civilization was created, that inhabited our solar system, leaving behind traces of their existence that we are beginning to find today. The massive “artificial structure” was recently analyzed by the researcher and YouTuber “SecureTeam10“,  who discusses and analyzes the” black rectangular structure “that is present in the images taken by NASA. A similar monolith can also be found on Mars and on one of its Phobos moons.

monolith-mercurio582 Nov 10/11/15

Curiously, astronaut Buzz Aldrin also said: “We must see better the moon of Mars (Phobos). On its surface there is a monolith, a very particular structure on this small potato-shaped object that revolves around Mars once every seven hours. So who put that thing on Phobos? Who put it? Well the universe put that object there, or if you choose … God put it there. ”

monolith-mercurio583 Nov 15-11-11

The mysterious structure seen on the surface of Mercury was first sighted in 2012, when researcher Scott Waring had analyzed it on his blog. However, the video uploaded to YouTube by Tyler Glockner, analyzes the mysterious structure in the shape of a monolith on the surface of Mercury: “I took an excellent image that became clear to me … that this is not an entrance open to everyone. In reality, it is something much more magnificent. It is a shadow … but where does the shadow come from? Dear friends, the rectangular object is a monolith structure with an imposing appearance above the surface. “

Many are convinced that the image presented by NASA actually describes a permanent structure on the surface of Mercury. Glockner believes that due to the inclination of the shadow from the Sun, you determine the black rectangle which is then actually a shadow of a permanent structure on the surface.

monolith-mercurio584 Nov 15-11-11

Monolith on Mars

According to data collected by the Messenger probe, Mercury is a planet subjected to high temperatures, but it also has water and organic material present on its surface. It is interesting to note that the amount of water on the planet is sufficient to cover Washington DC on ice. According to the scientists, it is believed that Mercury possesses its own dose of organic material, which when compared is similar to that which was present on our planet at the time of the creation of life, millions of years ago. Incredibly, this material, according to scientists, has been the building blocks of life.


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