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Cryptozoology

Footprints of a Sweets-Loving Bigfoot Found in North Carolina

“Mostly like candy, cookies, they love peanut brittle, chocolate, peanut butter sandwiches. They don’t like apples and bananas.”

If you’re one of those Bigfoot experts who’s been telling Bigfoot expert wannabes and wannasees to hang bags of apples from trees to attract them, meet Vicky Cook – the North Carolina woman who has not only seen Bigfoot, she has the grainy video and plaster footprint casts to prove it … and she says her Tar Heel Bigfoot neighbors prefer sweets to healthy snacks. Or is that just what she stocks in her cupboards?

“I think I’ve counted about eight different sized prints. This is a juvenile, but look at how long it is. That’s a big … big print.”

In her interview with Charlotte’s WCNC, Vicky Cook showed she’s more than just your average Bigfoot spotter by holding up plaster casts of the footprints she says she’s found in her Shelby yard since March. Shelby is a western suburb of Charlotte near the southern border with South Carolina. She also showed the reporter her dark and grainy video (watch it here) of what she claimed is at least one of the creatures that may have made one or more of the footprints.

Bigfoot bait?

“It went in front of my camera. we screamed we didn’t know what it was, though that thing was tall!”

That “we” indicates there’s at least one other witness (unless she’s implying that the Bigfoot screamed when it saw her scream – a great movie scene but probably not what she meant) but no one else appeared in the interview. Vicky also swears it’s not a bear she’s dealing with. Well, then … what is it?

“Sometimes I think this can’t be real.”

We know the feeling, Vicky, especially if you live in North or South Carolina. Neither one of those states made the recent Top 8 States to See Bigfoot list, despite the fact that both have many sightings. The Bigfoot 911 investigation group is in Marion, about 45 minutes north of Shelby, which also hosts the annual WNC Bigfoot Festival – the “the biggest Bigfoot Festival in eastern USA.” John Bruner is involved in both and has himself reported seeing a “large bipedal animal covered in hair” in the area in 2017. While those plus the 90+ other Bigfoot sightings in North Carolina (mostly in the Uwharrie National Forest to the east) warrants a festival and a big-city reporter visiting Shelby, does it prove Vicky has a family of Bigfoot eating her candy and cookies?

What about donuts?

“Any scientific expert will tell you me and the ‘Squatch like the same things.”

James ‘Bobo’ Fay – Bigfoot caller and cast member of “Finding Bigfoot” – said in an interview that they eat what humans eat, including cooked foods and especially bacon. While they’re eat apples and berries, he says he puts leftover donuts out for them too.

Maybe Vicky should work out a deal with Dunkin’. Then again, maybe Bigfoot should cut out the middleperson and make its own deal.

Source: Mysterious Universe

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Cryptozoology

Mystery primate terrorizes Texas residents

Authorities are still trying to track down the creature.

Multiple witnesses have reported seeing a large primate lurking in the streets of the southern state.

The creature, which has been described by some as a “monkey”, has been seen on numerous occasions in the city of Santa Fe with one witness even claiming it tried to make off with a cat.

Another witness, Patricia de la Mora, called the police in the early hours of Monday morning to report that she had seen a large primate from her window after hearing strange noises outside.

“I look out the window and I see it was in there,” she said. “It was a monkey, a big one.”

“He tried to find something. He looked over there, then he looked over there, and I closed the curtain. I didn’t want him to see me.”

According to reports, officers searched the area for an hour but failed to find any sign of the creature, however the very next day they received another report from someone else living nearby.

“Just had a monkey try to attack me, while checking my mail,” the witness said.

“I’ve spent the last 20 minutes in my car.”

As before, no evidence of the creature could be found.

Residents have since been warned to stay away from the animal if they happen to encounter it.

Efforts to track it down are still underway.

Source: Independent

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Cryptozoology

An underwater camera records a Loch Ness monster like creature for the first time

It seems that in recent months there has been renewed interest in the Loch Ness monster. As we have already mentioned in various publications, the legend of Nessie dates back to 1,500 years ago, with the first sighting of a “water beast” in the Ness River recorded in 565. But it was not until the twentieth century when the legend He made world-famous. On July 22, 1933, a man named George Spicer, who was traveling with his wife, reported seeing “an extraordinary form of animal” crossing in front of his vehicle. The unidentified creature was apparently huge, without noticeable limbs, but with a large body and a long neck. Spicer said he left a trail of weeds as he headed toward the lake.

And the following year, after at least two more sightings of unexplained creatures in the area, the most famous photograph of the Loch Ness monster was taken by the renowned British surgeon, Colonel Robert Wilson. Unfortunately, in the 1990s, it was revealed that photography was a hoax devised by a man named Christian Spurling. Since then, there have been countless sightings of Nessie. But now we could have the best evidence in history.

The best evidence in history?

The video shows what appears to be a great creature passing in front of an underwater camera located on the Ness River. It was placed here by the organization “Ness District Salmon Fishery Board” , a legal body responsible for the protection and improvement of salmon and sea trout fisheries in the District of Ness.

“Let’s be honest: when you see a large eel-shaped object passing your camera on the Ness River, the first thing you think about is the Loch Ness monster,” the organization writes on its Facebook page .

The chamber is installed on Loch Ness to follow salmon currents and help local fisheries replenish rivers and streams. Since the Loch Ness monster catches the attention of all of Scotland, it is easy to forget that the waterways of this country provide the best salmon fishing in the world for fly fishermen, conventional fishers and even those with reflexes fast enough to catch them with their own hands.

And, since there are no bears that belong to the wild variety in Scotland, humans, development and climate change are their worst enemies, so 2019 is the International Year of Salmon, to try to raise people’s awareness about the decrease in the number of these fish.

Apart from this detail, the only thing we know is that the video was published on September 1 and that the water flow is from left to right, indicating that Loch Ness is on the left and Moray Fjord on the right . The Moray Fjord opens towards the North Sea. While the creature looks large compared to the salmon that appears in the images, it is difficult to determine its actual size. 

For the “Ness District Salmon Fishery Board” it could be a European eel, an endangered species that breeds in a region of the western Atlantic called the Sargasso Sea. And it seems that science agrees with this theory, as a team from New Zealand collected about 250 water samples during the most extensive study ever conducted on what is the largest freshwater body in the Kingdom United. The subsequent analysis did not reveal evidence of a shark, a giant catfish or a prehistoric creature, but it did conclude that there could be something out of the ordinary.

Loch Ness monster underwater camera - An underwater camera first records the Loch Ness monster

The DNA of the eels was so abundant in the water that scientists concluded that giant specimens could be living in the depths of the lake, which when raised to the surface could have been confused with the mythical monster. The research was conducted by the geneticist Professor Neil Gemmell, from the University of Otago. Is that what the underwater camera recorded? Most people will think that some type of giant eel is, but there is a problem, and that is that these anguilliform fish are found in the Ness River between December and January. This video was recorded at the end of August.

What do you think about the video? Is it the Loch Ness monster?

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Cryptozoology

Fact or fiction? One theory ‘remains plausible’ in Loch Ness monster search

© KEYSTONE

stuff.co.nz

Fact or fiction? A Kiwi scientist is set to reveal his research into the Loch Ness monster.

An international team of researchers, led by Professor Neil Gemmell from the University of Otago, went searching for DNA from the famous 226-metre deep lake in Scotland in 2018.

That DNA was extracted from 250 water samples taken at various locations from the lake, and was then sequenced and analysed against existing databases.

The findings will be revealed at a press conference at Drumnadrochit, on the shores of Loch Ness, on September 5.

Gemmell, while tight-lipped over those results, did say there had been about four main explanations concerning sightings of the monster.

“Our research essentially discounts most of those theories, however, one theory remains plausible.”

Previously Gemmell said it would be a surprise if any evidence of DNA sequences similar to those from a large extinct marine reptile turned up.

If scientists detected sequences suggestive of a reptilian animal, “we can explore that further”, he said.

The study could also test whether the monster was a large fish: a catfish or sturgeon. The main driver of the project was to show how the science process worked.

“It’s a project people are excited about and we’re able to tell them about the science we do in a different context,” Gemmell said.

“Monster of no monster, environmental DNA – the technology we’re using – is a very exciting way to assess living species in a particular environment. It’s very very good in water.”

The technology had gained widespread popularity in the past five years, and had been used in New Zealand for about three years, but not at Loch Ness.

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