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First Ever Human Robots Invented By Japanese Scientists

Written by Steven Bancarz

Human robots have recently been invented by Japanese scientist, inventor, and professor Dr. Hiroshi Ishiguro, and they pose a striking resemblance to human beings.  In fact, they almost look more real than human beings.  This was the goal of Hiroshi when he was creating the humanoid robot: to make it as indistinguishable in behaviour and appearance from a human being as possible.  Here are a few of these things in action:

The introduction of these robots into our society could create some problems.  As a presenter of these androids said at a conference, he sees them as being the future of telecommunications.

Will we begin to see these robots fill job spots involving repetitive tasks and data management?  What about factory jobs?  The creation of fully operational and functional human robots could have some serious economic implications.

They are nowhere near that advanced in their behaviour yet however.  In fact, they don’t even control themselves yet.  They are controlled by someone behind the scenes who speaks through them and moves their mouths and arms with computer software. They are nonetheless a huge milestone for human ingenuity.

What was his inspiration for creating these humanoids? Here is professor Ishiguro talking his reasons for taking on such a project.

These things are a scientific marvel.  Although they lack things like freedom of the will, rationality, and subjectivity, they seem to be capable of basic human interactions.  He recently revealed 2 more at the National Museum of Merging Science and Innovation this year.  Here they are being interviewed:

What would happen if we were one day able to give these androids human-like processing capabilities?  What if we could somehow replicate human intelligence within them, and program them to be behaviourally identical to us?

IBM is famous for creating a supercomputer that they call “Watson”, which is a cognitive technology that can do exactly what humans do.  It uses programmatic computing plus the combination of three additional capabilities: natural language processing, hypothesis generation and evaluation, and dynamic learning.

Through repeated use, Watson literally gets smarter by tracking feedback from its users and learning from both successes and failures.  So this cognitive computer can literally read, generate hypotheses, learn, and hold a conversation.  Here is a video of Watson beating humans in Jeopardy:

If I were professor Ishiguro, I would be contacting IBM to try to combine the world of androids with the world of cognitive technology.  We have all of the technology we need to create a world similar to that in I Robot.  The only question is, do we want that?  Imagine having a robot driving your taxi, or acting as your assistant at work.  What impacts would that have on our civilization, both socially and existentially?

A question that personally interests me is, are they persons? Would they deserve to be treated fairly and lovingly? What do you guys think about this?

 

Sources: Listed within the article

About the Author:  My name is Steven Bancarz, and I am the creator of ‘Spirit Science and Metaphysics’.  Thanks for taking the time to read this article!  If you would like to subscribe to my newsletter, you can do so HERE.

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Science & Technology

Tesla Long-Lost Drawings Reveal Genius Map For Multiplication

Some important documents have been uncovered by Abe Zucca, an artist from Arizona. The documents uncovered include an original Nikola Tesla map to multiplication which is said to contain answers to questions mathematicians have been trying to solve for years. Among the documents, there are also drawings of handheld technological devices and manuscripts detailing free-energy systems.

Map To Multiplication Discovered

Joey Grether, a high school teacher, examined the documents and said of the Map of Multiplication, that it, “offers a comprehensive visual understanding of how all numbers are self-organized into 12 positions of compostability.” He continued to say, “This breakthrough is phenomenal. If we could get students all over the globe to use this technique, to play with it, and help figure out how to use it, we could overcome our cultural aversion to Mathematics. Instead of memorizing the multiplication table, we could learn the positions of numbers and have a better understanding of how they work.”

All numbers work together based on a pattern of twelve numbers also known as 12x or multiples of twelve. There are twelve months in the year, twelve hours on the clock (and twenty-four in a day) and twelve inches in a foot. Twelve is thought to be the most highly recognised composite system with all it’s multiples being divisible by 2, 3, 4 and 6. With a chance of four in twelve numbers being prime, this is another key reason for twelve being an important number.

Numbers, according to this diagram, organise themselves into the pattern of 3, 6, 9 and 12 repeating the sequence, and a quote by Tesla which said, “If you only knew the magnificence of the 3, 6 and 9, then you would have the key to the universe, “suggests that this is vital to solving many of the problems mathematicians have long been trying to uncover.

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Musk Admits Automation At Tesla Factory Was a Bad Idea

Elon Musk is under a lot of pressure right now – Model 3 production over at the Tesla factory isn’t exactly going according to plan. First, Q1 numbers looked grim: less than 10,000 Model 3s rolled off the assembly line — a far shot from his promise of producing 5,000 Model 3s a week. And then there’s the other distraction: Tesla’s big fight with the feds over releasing data it has on a fatal Model X crash back in March.

Elon has a lot of damage control ahead of him, and of course, a growing number of impatient customers and investors.

So where’s the fire, Elon? Is Tesla’s Gigafactory not up to the task? In a head-turning interview with CBS Good Morning, he claimed: it’s the dang robots.

Tesla has increasingly relied on streamlining its assembly process, and has ended up with one of the most robotics-reliant car production lines in the world. As more robots rolled out on to the factory floor, fewer humans were involved — and they’re hurting, spurned on by Musk’s ambitious goals.

The plan: a robotic car-building factory operating at superhuman speeds. But the numbers seem to suggest that Tesla isn’t even close. Who knew that building a $35,000 EV was complicated?

Tesla’s growing pains are more apparent than ever. Musk admits he even sleeps inside a conference room, wearing his little Tesla-logo-adorned baseball cap, at the company’s Fremont factory. “It’s terrible, it’s not even a comfortable couch,” he admits to the CBS reporter. It’s an odd attempt to send a message to the world (and shareholders): See, he cares after all! He’s just like us!

Humans are truly underrated, Elon. But they have their limits, too.

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Uber’s CEO Knows We Need Equality To Move The World Forward

Shortly after taking the helm as CEO of Uber, Dara Khosrowshahi read the now-infamous report on the beleaguered company’s culture, it was bad. Real bad. He had to take breaks, he admitted in an on-stage interview with legendary journalist Tina Brown yesterday at the Women in the World conference in New York City.

Uber has had to do a bit of soul-searching in the past year or so. There was the viral blog post from female engineer Susan Fowler that revealed the company’s toxic culture of serial harassment, eventually leading to the ousting Khosrowshahi’s predecessor Travis Kalanick. There was a massive data breach that came to light more than a year after it happened, and the lawsuit against self-driving car company Waymo. And most recently, an autonomous vehicle killed a pedestrian in Arizona. All this has been, understandably, bad for business — users have been deleting the app in droves, and the company’s stock tanked.

Khosrowshahi knew the company was in crisis, of course (though some of the above happened after he became CEO). But in some ways, that makes things easier to shake up. “The crisis was so big that I didn’t have to convince anyone to change things,” he said. He was drawn to the company because it presented a unique opportunity to make a difference in the world; if Uber was going to do that, Khosrowshahi knew the company’s values had to shift.

Late last year, after extensive crowdsourcing, voting, and focus group testing, Khosrowshahi released the company’s new norms, such as “We celebrate differences” and “We do the right thing.” Yes, these new values sound cheesy, but it’s a dramatic shift from the “hustlin’” and “toe-stepping” of the past that allowed such rampant and destructive behavior at the company.

“It’s clear that the culture and approach that got Uber where it is today is not what will get us to the next level,” Khosrowshahi wrote in a post about the new norms on LinkedIn.

At the Women in the World event, Khosrowshahi elaborated a bit on what exactly that means. “There are so many women who are COOs of these companies, but they never get to be CEO,” Brown said, pointing out that male CEOs always talk about their “great pipeline of women.” “But that pipeline seems pretty congested. My question is: How is your pipeline, Dara?”

Khosrowshahi noted that this takes time and investment. Too many companies focus on recruitment when they talk about women in leadership. Uber has done that, he said, but he’s really most interested in development “Recruitment is like a sugar high,” he said — if you really want women to be in charge, it takes years. He points to his time at Expedia, in which he put forth a conscious effort to raise the number of women in charge from about 15 percent to 25 percent. “It took years to do so because it took developing women, shaping them, working with our culture, making sure you move them to the right places in the company,” Khosrowshahi said. He seems to imply that they could do the same at Uber.

But true equality goes beyond gender  it means making a more equal society for everyone. And that fits into Uber’s larger vision of taking you wherever you need to go, no matter how you do it, even if it’s not in a car. Cars sit idle 95 percent of the time, Khosrowshahi said, and parking takes up 25 to 30 percent of space in cities. He envisions a future without car ownership. “If mobility and movement is available to everybody, the delta between the value of real estate in Manhattan vs Queens starts diminishing,” Khosrowshahi said. “Bringing the cost of movement down creates a society that is more equal, and creates opportunity for more people on broader basis.”

And why should you trust Uber to get us to that future? Khosrowshahi’s ready. “Because I’m in charge.”

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