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Deep State is Now Pushing Satanism: Huff Post: “Satan Is Having A Moment”

(Stillness in the Storm Editor) The Deep State, according to several insiders, whistleblowers, and respected researchers, practice dark Luciferianism, also known as Satanism. Part of their long term agenda is to eventually come out in the open with this dark and sadistic practice, recruiting the masses into the faith en mass. In order to do that, they need to “sell” satanism to the public. They need to make it hip, cool, and fun. How do they do this? Many different ways, such as in the Netflix series Chilling Adventures of Sabrina, which is filled with rather obvious glorifications of satanic ideology.

The following article, published by Huffpost, an arguably Deep State news outlet, is the latest pro-Satanism propaganda.

Read this carefully.

The satanic augmentation of culture is not a new agenda. These efforts have been in place for at least the past 250 years, spearheaded by dark occult groups and royal families since the beginning of the 18th century. By all accounts, secular society is increasingly becoming satanic in nature, while never explicitly citing satanic tenets in the process.

Thus, the culture war, so to speak, is covert and hidden. It is waged in the hearts and minds of each individual, through cultural influences that are increasingly dominated by the Deep State and it’s manifold influencers.

To be sure, learning how badly our world has already aligned with a satanic agenda is unsettling. But what’s more unsettling is what can happen if we, who are alive today, avoid this information, and thereby unwittingly act to ensure the distortion continues.

Culture is itself a tapestry of individual actions. Your choice, your actions, no matter how small, contribute to the whole.

I encourage you to gain awareness of these influences so that you can, in your own way, guard against them, and thereby positively contribute to changing the tide towards goodness once again.

SourceHuffington Post

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Satanists, it turns out, are everything you think they’re not: patriotic, charitable, ethical, equality-minded, dedicated to picking up litter with pitchforks on an Arizona highway.

That much is clear in the fantastic new documentary “Hail Satan?” — which chronicles the rise of the Satanic Temple, a movement that has little to do with its titular demon. Founded in 2013, the organization is equal parts modern-day religion, political activist coalition and meta cultural revolution. By reclaiming the pop iconography that has long frightened evangelical America ― devil worship, ritualistic sacrifice, horns, pentagrams, the so-called Black Mass ― the Satanic Temple aims to catch people’s attention and then surprise them with messages of free speech, compassion, liberty and justice for all.

No wonder membership has spiked since Donald Trump’s election.

Penny Lane’s film, opening in limited release this weekend, enthusiastically dispels myths about the history of satanism, using the controversial belief system as a lens to survey the myriad ways our government has made Christianity the national religion. If a state legislature votes to erect a Ten Commandments monument, the church argues, why shouldn’t the Satanic Temple be able to introduce a pillar of their own? It’s only fair.

I sat down with Lane in New York for a fascinating conversation about making the movie, how Hollywood has popularized erroneous devil worship clichés, the satanic-panic frenzy of the ’80s and ’90s, and the ubiquitous theocratic motto “In God We Trust.”

At what point did you know what this movie would be? It’s more than a profile of an organization or an exhaustive cultural history.

There’s a moment early on in my research, just in my reading, where I realized that I was completely wrong about something. I thought, upon casually scanning headlines about this group and what they were up to, that the Satanic Temple was like a fiction ― a political troll satire thing, like The Yes Men, where they were pretending that they were members of an imaginary organization in order to make these points. The moment I knew what the film would be was when I realized that that was totally wrong.

What would a new religion, starting from scratch, do if it wanted to make sense in the world we actually live in?Penny Lane, director of “Hail Satan?”

The [group] perhaps had started as that, and then had very quickly evolved to be something real, where there is a thing called the Satanic Temple, and there are members, and they have very particular beliefs, and they’re not just trolls. I was like, “Oh, that’s a cool story.” It was almost the same as the birth of any religion; first, you have to have some publicity stunts to get attention ― some miracles, maybe. From there, maybe you have something to say, and then people would join. I feel like I had never seen that story: watching a religion get born, right before our eyes.

The story of the Satanic Temple is one of free speech. Did you always know the movie would be about that?

Sort of, yeah. I don’t think it’s really about free speech. The politics of what they’re doing is obviously really important, and as a particularly American phenomenon, they’re trying to uphold the First Amendment. Their activism is not particularly radical. They’re not anarchists, they don’t want to burn it all down.

The freedom-of-speech thing, for me, comes under the headline of “a new religion for modernity.” What could religion be in the 21st century? What would a new religion, starting from scratch, do if it wanted to make sense in the world we actually live in? Would it be about nonscientific, paranormal claims about invisible people in the sky, or would it be about embracing the centuries of progress that the Enlightenment project has given us? It seems like that would be a better religion.

Satanic Temple co-founder Lucien Greaves delivers a speech in front of the Arkansas Capitol, with the group's Baphomet statue

Satanic Temple co-founder Lucien Greaves delivers a speech in front of the Arkansas Capitol, with the group’s Baphomet statue by his side.

You started working on the film before Trump’s election. Once his presidency began, did anything shift in terms of what the movie was trying to say?

Like everything else, it’s the same answer. Everything was suddenly more urgent. Trump’s alliance with the evangelical community [has] none of the values but all of the power grab. It was very frightening for a lot of people, who ended up with people like Mike Pence, who is legitimately a theocrat. He would love for the Bible to be the document that we obey as Americans. Then, someone like Betsy DeVos: still super evangelical, loves prayer in school.

It was super easy, if you were me, under Barack Obama, to not pay attention. I don’t even know what that guy was doing for, like, six months at a time, Now you’re hyper-aware and fearful. So I think for a lot of people, this story took on a lot more urgency. And certainly, membership in the Satanic Temple spiked after Trump’s election. Many people that I spoke to told me that Trump’s election was a turning point for them.

The moment in the film that stunned me the most is when a Satanic Temple member reframes satanic panic as the Catholic Church projecting its own history of abuse onto the public. We all know how ridiculous and sensationalistic that era was, but I’d never heard it put that way. It’s pretty stunning.

I had the same response to that. I will say this about that: The entire history of satanism is one of projection. Satanic panic is one example. All the way up until 1966, there were no people who called themselves satanists. There literally weren’t any. There was a fear that manifested into an elaborate fantasy on the part of the Catholic Church, mostly, if you want to point a finger somewhere.

Then you have this imaginary idea that everywhere around you, there are these devil worshipers who are doing these terrible things. In many cases ― well, in all cases ― that was used as justification to kill people, whether it was witches or, for many millennia, the Jews. All the same, atrocities were attributed to these groups of people by the Catholics as a way of murdering them. Then you go into the satanic panic and you see this same thing. I was blown away as well.

Penny Lane, whose credits include "Nuts!" and "Our Nixon."

Penny Lane, whose credits include “Nuts!” and “Our Nixon.”

Was there a singular moment like that for you ― something that made your jaw drop?

I would say the main thing for me was the moment when I suddenly turned to my producer and said, “How is our national motto ‘In God We Trust’?” I’m a lifelong atheist. Somehow, I never realized that that is so weird.

And it’s ubiquitous. It’s on every dollar bill you touch.

What they do, the satanists, is they awaken you to look around and see the world you actually live in. Suddenly, you do notice the Ten Commandments monuments on the statehouse lawn. Suddenly, you do notice that we think it’s normal that people pass out Bibles in public school. These are all actually not normal, in some sense. It looks normal to us because we’re so used to it.

Of course, it’s a long story, but the most recent iteration of putting God in government was really only 50 years ago, as opposed to 200 or 300 years ago, which is what I would have assumed. I think that, for me, was the biggest mind-blowing thing. It’s actually a quite modern phenomenon.

If you went home and Googled it, you’d see that there’s hundreds and hundreds of these local fights happening where some senator somewhere wants to put the Ten Commandments on statehouse property or some senator somewhere wants to have prayer in public schools or write “In God We Trust” on police cars. Those battles all look really stupid and petty. Who cares if the Phoenix City Council wants to have prayers before their meetings? But when you look at them in totality and start to understand, it’s not like they’re going to stop. It’s not like, “Oh, we got ‘In God We Trust’ on the police car, now we’re done.”

It’s evidence and ammunition for the next battle. With these Ten Commandments monuments, people now suddenly believe that this is an integral part of our American history, when in fact, they’re movie props. That was very chilling for me.

Initially, someone like [Satanic Temple co-founder] Lucien Greaves would make that point, and I’d think, “OK, that sounds a little bit paranoid, or a little bit of a conspiracy theory; it’s probably not that serious.” As I did the research, I realized that he was completely right. I didn’t know the extent to which there’s an organized, very well-funded, very effective lobbying happening nationwide. You don’t have to be paranoid to think, “Just because we have a liberal, secular democracy now doesn’t mean we will always.”

It’s not saying it’s gonna happen tomorrow, but it has happened in the past. Iran was a secular nation [until 1980], when all a sudden, it became a theocracy. It’s something that awakened a kind of urgency in me. I never thought there was any reason to be at all concerned. It’s certainly much more possible every time you let one of these small steps get taken.

Mia Farrow in "Rosemary's Baby," released in 1968.

Mia Farrow in “Rosemary’s Baby,” released in 1968.

I’m fascinated by the way devil-worship imagery has infused pop culture. A few years ago, when the horror movie “The Witch” came out, the Satanic Temple was very supportive of it, which is interesting because that movie embraces the occult in a way that runs counter to the organization.

There’s never been a fictional movie about satanists that was even kind of accurate.

Right, one that doesn’t involve some type of sacrifice or bloodletting.

Not even close. It would be really interesting to see if someone could ever do that. I think it would be so confusing.

Did you talk to folks about cinematic depictions of satanism?

It’s so weird and interesting to watch that negotiation take place. You’ve got this weird cycle ― you see it all the time, with “Sabrina” and “American Horror Story” and whatever ― where you have these depictions of devil worshipers, and it attracts rebellious teenagers to this idea of satanism. Any of them who actually develop any interest go to the bookstore and learn about Anton LaVey [who founded the Church of Satan in 1966]. Then they’re like, “Oh, this isn’t actually at all what ‘Sabrina’ said it was, but it is interesting to me.”

If you’re a certain kind of provocative person who likes to troll people, you might be into putting the pentagram on your shirt. But there’s no satanists in the way that you think there are in the movies. Then you end up with more satanists of the real kind because there’s a weird back-and-forth where they take the iconography and the imagery, all of which, as you said earlier, are projections. There never was a Black Mass ― it was only a fantasy on the part of Catholics. Then you’ve got the real satanists doing a fake Black Mass. It just confuses people to no end. I try to explain it to people and I’m like, “They really want you to think about the fact that there never really were any satanists.”

The imagery becomes meta. It’s all about reclaiming what people assumed was happening in suburban basements or whatever.

It’s a very weird relationship between the pop-cultural fantasy of satanism and the reality of satanism, and the back-and-forth between them is very complicated. Anton LaVey loved that shit. He circulated lots of rumors.

I think it’s been demonstrated that it’s not true, but he wanted everyone to believe that he actually played the devil in “Rosemary’s Baby.” Even while he’s saying satanism is about atheism, freedom, individual values [and] sexual liberation, he was also really into the idea of being associated with “Rosemary’s Baby.” You can’t do satanism without the popular fear of Satan, so those movies help. They continue to keep Satan relevant.

No one cares if you want to be an atheist and go home and yell about how dumb Christians are. They really do care if you’re a Satanist. You get a lot of attention.

It’s like reverse-engineering the way that people develop a belief system. I would have thought of it as bad branding, like, “Hey, you guys, movies like ‘Hereditary’ are not the way it works.”

It’s not bad branding. It just helps them seem more relevant. At the end of the day, if you think satanism is bad branding, you’re just not a satanist. For them, it can’t be anything else. It’s not like they were looking around for the right symbol, considered a spaghetti monster and went with satanism.

Right, and it’s dependent on the idea that Satan is a concept that comes from organized religion. 

Unlike the spaghetti monster, they want to be part of culture. They want to be like, “We, as Western civilization, have been having this now 2,000-plus-year-old conversation about good and evil and what it means to be a human and how we got here and how we’re supposed to live. We want to be part of that conversation. We don’t want to be like Richard Dawkins and just go over there and say, ‘Look at all these idiots. Fuck ’em all, wait till they’re all dead. Can’t wait for the future secular world.’”

They want to be part of the conversation, so it has to be Satan, because that’s how they get to be a part of the conversation. No one cares if you want to be an atheist and go home and yell about how dumb Christians are. They really do care if you’re a satanist. You get a lot of attention.

Satanic Temple supporters gather at an August 2018 rally for religious liberty in Little Rock, Arkansas.

Satanic Temple supporters gather at an August 2018 rally for religious liberty in Little Rock, Arkansas.

What’s the thing you left on the cutting-room floor that was the hardest to let go?

All this satanic panic stuff. We had so much more. It’s years and years, with all these cases. The power of the human mind ― it’s just nuts. I think about all those kids who were convinced by adults that they had been basically fucking raped by the devil and that they were irrevocably harmed by it, walking around as adults. That’s so disturbing to me. Those poor people. I think that was the hardest thing we cut.

We did so much really good research and interviews on that topic, and then we ended up with one scene because it was just so much. To start to get into false memories, multiple-personality disorder, dissociative identity, all these psychological ideas that allowed this concept to continue, and what happened with this crazy alliance with feminists who were like, “Believe the victims, child abuse is bad,” alongside these crazy people who were just imagining devil worshippers everywhere. Gloria Steinem was a big part of this. It’s a long story. Once we had to start explaining what dissociative identity disorder was, we were sunk.

The fact is, there would be no Satanic Temple without the satanic panic. It’s very generational. It’s people our age, because we’re like, “Oh yeah, right. We all learned about satanism on daytime television.”

Based on your research, what really was satanic panic? What was actually going on?

That’s what’s crazy. When I talk to all these experts, there’s so many factors. Anyone who gives you an answer to that is leaving out something. It really was the growth of an understanding of domestic sexual violence as a very important, real thing in the ’70s. There was a moment: “Fuck, most rape is happening in the home.” That happened, then there was the stranger-danger panic, which was a whole other thing. Then there was the rise of the Christian right, and their dominance in popular culture through televangelism. Then you had women going into the workforce in record numbers, leaving their kids in daycare. A lot of anxiety about that, and guilt: “What’s happening with our children while we’re off at work? Is this good for society?”

There was so much going on that it’s hard to blame any one person, so then no one got blamed and no one ever apologized. Everyone had their little piece to the puzzle. Why did it end ― which is at least an equally important question ― is also unclear. It just sort of did. It wasn’t because we as a society all woke up one day and had a conversation about this, because it seems like we never did that.

For someone who wants to explore more about the history of satanism, what else was part of your research? 

I was reading First Amendment law, trying to understand the framework. Jay Wexler was our legal expert ― I read a bunch of books by him. Then Kevin Kruse was our historian ― he’d written a really good book called “One Nation Under God” that helped me understand that history. Then there was Jesper Petersen, who was our religion expert. I’d read a bunch of his books and articles about satanism as a religious phenomenon of modernity, and that was super helpful for me to understand, from a religious-scholar point of view, what this meant.

There was another expert who we didn’t get to use, Debbie Nathan, who wrote the seminal book on the satanic panic, “Satan’s Silence.” Then another expert we didn’t end up using was Kathleen Stewart, who’s a journalist, whose beat has been the attempt on the part of evangelicals to take over the government. Amazing story — who’s making the plan happen, who are the lobbying groups, what is the model legislation that’s being written by these lobbying groups, what’s their stated agenda. Also, we didn’t even do the interview, but we wanted to get a Christian theologian who could talk to us about the history of the devil. It’s not like there’s one representation of the devil. In fact, there was no devil in Christianity for quite some time. Only in retrospect did we start saying, “Oh, the snake in the garden of Eden is the devil.”

Because in the Bible, Satan’s just a fallen angel.

Yes, exactly. The history of Lucifer and this idea of Satan, which was a word out of Judaism that just meant “the adversary,” combined and created its own new narrative. Again, we keep rewriting the Bible, so then future generations of scholars go back and read the Bible and say, “Look, here’s Satan all along.”

Part of the message of the Satanic Temple is that the meaning of symbols changes. They’re malleable to culture. Things change over time. It’s not insane to say this Baphomet image means freedom and diversity and reconciliation of opposites and openness to all. Just because you think it means the devil and evil and baby sacrificing doesn’t mean that’s what it means. That’s why they were so mad at “Sabrina” when they ripped off the Baphomet monument and put it in that show as a monument that means evil. They’re like, “We worked really hard to make that monument. All of our lawsuits were proposing a meaning for this monument. And if that monument ever did get installed on a statehouse lawn, the meaning of it would be religious diversity.”

There’s no particular reason we have to hold on to this idea of Satan as the ultimate embodiment of evil. I think that’s a really important thing. The meaning of these images is not settled. The Ten Commandments monument, the meaning of it 60 years ago was “go see this Charlton Heston movie.” Now it’s like an important part of our heritage as a nation, the idea that Ten Commandments are so foundational. You’re like, “This is not what it was one generation ago.”

This interview has been edited and condensed.

Various historians, insiders, and whistleblowers claim that dark occult groups and forces have long controlled the planet and shaped its history. The preceding video offers some of this history in an effort to substantiate the notion of a powerful group working behind the scenes, sometimes called the Illuminati, the Deep State, the Order of the Black Sun, and so on. Properly identifying causes in reality is essential so as to lead a fulfilling life and work constructively to improve the world around you. We need accurate and complete knowledge. With this knowledge in hand, an individual can contend with the realities of malevolence, which will inexorably lead to an activation of the truth-seeking and freedom craving urges.

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https://www.huffpost.com/entry/hail-satan-documentary-penny-lane_n_5cb62721e4b0ffefe3b84c1c

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Occult

Who and why he removed 10 pages from the Devil’s Bible?

One of the largest medieval manuscripts is the so-called Codex Gigas, also known as the Devil’s Bible, because it has a large image of the Devil on one of the pages .

The weight of the book is 75 kg, its width is 49 cm and its height is 89 cm. It is estimated that it would take at least 30 years for one person to write and draw the whole book.

According to legend, however, it took only one night to do so for an unknown monk living in the 13th century AD. The same monk was imprisoned in a cell for violation of discipline and vows, and a much more severe punishment awaited him. In an attempt to avoid punishment, the monk decided to surprise the superiors with a book that described ” all the knowledge of the earth .”

To write this book, the monk turned to the Devil himself for help. In exchange for his soul, the Devil created the Codex Gigas overnight.

Initially, the Devil’s Bible was stored in the monastery in Podlazice, in the territory of modern-day Czech Republic, near the town of Chrudim. After a while it was moved to the monastery in Brumov. In 1648, it was stolen by Swedish soldiers and taken to Sweden as a prey. In 1649 the manuscript was placed in the Royal Library of Stockholm, where it is still preserved.

There are 310 pages in the Devil’s Bible, but there were 320 pages before. So, 10 pages were taken and what was written in them is still unknown to anyone.

It is officially believed that the statutes of the Benedictine monastery are written on these 10 pages, but many conspiracy theorists are sure that no one would extract the written rules of the monastery from such a huge and valuable book, and that the missing pages clearly contain much more important information.

For example, the prophecies about the Apocalypse. Or, the so-called “devil’s prayer”, the reading of which, under certain conditions, is described on the vanished pages to summon the Devil. At the same time, the sheets did not just fall out of the bound book because of old age and decay. They have been deliberately removed. They were cut off from the Codex and this is evident from the cropping of these pages.

None of the historians knows when and by whom these pages were removed. In the 16th century, one of the mystics of the Paracelsus Circle became interested in the Code, and in 1590, his student visited the Brumov Monastery to study it.

The Code also attracts the attention of the Holy Roman Emperor – Rudolf II, who sought occult information in it. He even ordered the Codex to be transported to his Prague Castle. Then the legend of the Devil’s Bible began to spread. Most probably, it was Rudolf II who tore these pages, finding in them the occult records he needed.

Another oddity of Codex Gigas is that no one has even tried to rewrite this book. In those centuries, when printing was not yet invented, important manuscripts were constantly rewritten to reproduce.

Moreover, even more voluminous and complex texts have been rewritten than the Devil’s Bible.

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Black Cats and Witches

In some areas where people live, black cats that are completely black in fur, are a rarity, and this factor adds to their mysterious trait. Also, in the night, a black cat can be practically invisible, so people in the darkness see just the two eyes of the cat, which can be a pale shade of green, orange, or yellow or be amber colored.

Many superstitious people were terrified, thinking an invisible creature or demon with 2 eyes or simply 2 floating, glowing eyes were staring at them in the dark. Black cats were the traditional and most common creatures that lived with witches even though witches had other animals around them, at times, as rats, dogs, ferrets, birds, frogs, toads, and hares. These small animals were often kept in pots or baskets lined with sheep’s wool and fed various things including milk, bread, meat, and blood. Often, such animals would have the same affectionate nick names or common names that parents give their children.

When a person, for example, an old lady, especially a person who lives alone, has, for example, a pet black cat; there are people who strangely talk to their pets as though they are human beings and can understand every word. Centuries ago, when belief in witchcraft was very strong, many people that saw and heard a person talking to an animal seriously wondered if the animal was a spirit or demon in animal form that attends and obeys its master- a witch. The occult name for such an animal is called a familiar. There are other reasons that can make people further wonder if a person is a witch; as that person being unnaturally mean; highly aggressive; hateful in personality, and if such a person were also very ugly, it would add to their resentment by others.

The American author, Edgar Allen Poe (1809-1849) wrote a short horror fiction story called “The  Black Cat” that would reinforce the idea of a black cat having supernatural powers. In that story, a black cat gets its revenge against its owner who has abused it, then horribly mutilates it, and later kills it.Once, in the 1970’s, there was an occult supplier who sold, among many other things, tall candles in the shape and color of a black cat. The sales pitch was that the black cat, being a symbol of bad luck, when burned in candle form would destroy that black cat image and this became a ritual for good luck.For many, many years, black cats have gotten a bad rap; a really unfair, undeserved reputation of being evil and harmful to humans. Some people, over the years, tried to undo; reverse this situation by claiming that black cats are actually good luck. In certain parts of Europe, for instance, black cats are looked upon as actually bringing good luck.

Some folks, centuries ago, thought that at times a witch’s familiar or familiars was a person or people that , from the power of witchcraft, got turned into an animal or animals as punishment for somehow angering a witch.Black cats began to develop an association with evil in the minds of various people, centuries ago, from the extreme worry that any black cat there was could be a demon in disguise. Many people developed a great fear, distrust, and revulsion to all black cats and would chase them away, at times even throwing small objects as stones at the animals.Various people began to believe that the black cat, from its demonic significance, brought bad luck, especially if a black cat crosses your path.

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Satanic pacts to create “immortal guerrillas” in Colombia?

For many years Colombia has been hit by a dangerous guerrilla that has not been eliminated, why? The reason could be more macabre than many think: Satanic covenants.

People who, in one way or another have had contact with the guerrillas, tell how they have witnessed guerrillas who are shot, get up and continue fighting armed, some with a simple machete.

Although it sounds like something impossible, it is a speech that is repeated constantly among the interviewees. One of the most chilling stories tells us how, during a night like any other, a squad of paramilitaries was awakened and taken to a hill in the jungle.

In front of them lay a boy who was, if anything, 16 years old. The women were trained on the other side and the commander, with a machete in hand, called one of them and handed it to him, ordering him to behead him.

The woman said she could not do it and, in a threatening voice, the commander shouted: “He who does not serve to kill, serves to be killed.”

With nothing else to do, the woman dropped the machete on the supplicant boy, but could not finish the work. The commander took the machete and with a certain blow, beheaded the young man in front of everyone.

Without hesitation, he got up and exclaimed: “Welcome to the ACC, I am commander 030 and I must deliver three thousand souls to the devil.”

“Commander 030” was one of those immortal soldiers who, based on satanic covenants and sacrifices, had obtained eternal protection. To this myth are added declarations of United States military factions that have faced the Colombian guerrillas.

Some say they shot them with AK47 rifles and saw how, without any protection, they received the bullets and they did not pass through them.

They simply did not harm them beyond a bruise. Other more extremists say they have seen them become invisible, heal at great speeds and disappear from one moment to another.

Many communities that live in nearby areas where the guerrilla is alive, tell how these people use prayers, rituals, sacrifices and satanic pacts.

These stories are supported by the latest findings made by the Colombian and US military, where they have found “picket houses” with prisoners, still alive, dismembered.

Some captured say that this is part of one of the many satanic rituals and pacts they perform for their protection. Sounds really amazing and macabre at the same time.

But many of these guerrillas have been seen killing soldiers armed with guns using a simple machete, which leads us to really think about the chances of this being real …

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