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A Quantum Dialogue on the Meaning and Purpose of Existence

Dialogue between a master A and his pupil B:

B: The Universe, or what is referred to  as ‘space’, seems to be a kind of ethereal void, populated here and there by stars, planets, occasional meteors, comets and such like.

A: The Universe seems like a vast and mysterious place, but when you consider that it is contained within a dew drop or a human cell, it becomes less distant. In fact, it becomes very immediate.

I refer, of course, to the microcosmic condensation of the macrocosm.

What is ‘space’? It is not what it seems. The word does not describe the reality. It seems void because you are only using your five senses to analyse it. There is no ‘space’, the area referred to is full of energy. An energy field. But you don’t recognize that which you can’t experience with your five senses.

B: What other sense do we possess, other than that which recognizes reality through touch, sight, taste, smell and sound?

A: We have our perception and intuition; these are receptors that pick up vibrational messages due to the absolute interconnectivity of all matter and energy. When you connect up with the source of all that is, you find that you are part of it, not distant from it. You cannot observe or experience it dispassionately – from a distance – because you yourself are part of the composition.

B: But rational observation forms the basis of all science, it enables us to understand the nature and structure of things, including the Universe. We want to understand how and what life is.

A: Such curiosity is a perfectly acceptable condition in mankind, but it arrives at the wrong answers;

unless man feels himself to be part of that which he observes. Not only this, but recognizes that he effects that which he focuses upon. Both intentionally and unintentionally.

B: How is this achieved?

A: One cannot say ‘how’ it is achieved, unless one is prepared to come at it from the opposite dimension and perception from that which one is accustomed to, in one’s experience of everyday life.

B: Oh?

A: What we experience in our typical daily lives is that which operates, almost exclusively, within the realm of the five senses. Take sight: Visible light- what we ‘see’ – constitutes less than 0.5% of what is actually ‘out there’ in our Universe. Or ‘in here’ within our microcosmic and internal Universe. So we cannot understand, within the scientific discipline which belongs to the Newtonian school of thought, how and what life is, if we only rely upon our five senses to reach our conclusion. There is a missing dimension.

B: What holds us back from being able to experience this missing dimension?

A: Almost everything which forms the experience of what we call life, here on Earth. We operate within a three-dimensional framework which has become so institutionalized that we take it to be the sum total of everything that is. Whereas actually, it constitutes something quite alien and divorced from the true state of existence: that which we experience in the fourth dimension and beyond.

B: Tell me more about the fourth dimension and beyond..

A: You already know something about this. When you fall asleep and dream, you are entering this dimension, subconsciously. When you get an ‘inkling’ about something – and then find that this inkling turned out to be true – you are also touching the fourth dimension. The problem is that, most of the time, you dismiss these experiences as being irrelevant to the tasks and needs to which you address yourself.  Those tasks which form the daily diet of a materialistically aligned world. That superficial repetitive pattern which forms the central point of focus of life on earth at this time. That which broadly operates within what we call ‘the status quo’.

B: I want to understand what this ‘other dimension’ is and how to have greater access to it. I do get these ‘inklings’ from time to time, but never really questioned where they come from.

A: Alright. Intellectually, you can already get closer to the higher dimensions by using something of what (well focused) three-dimensional thinking has already been able to ascertain, concerning further dimensions.

Take that chair you’re sitting on. It appears to be hard, doesn’t it? But actually, when seen/experienced from the higher dimensional state, it is not. It is just a mass of whirling atoms, clustering together in such a way as to provoke the sense of shape and form we call a chair. If we understand correctly from science what atoms are, we would not describe them as ‘hard’. Simply as ‘energy’. Mutable energy.

Now, look at me, or look at yourself. We too, seen from the higher dimension, are also a whirling mass of energetic particles (called atoms). The only difference between us and the chair, is that we are imbued with a whole host of sentient, sensitive attributes which operate on a vibrational wave length tuned to a different (higher) frequency than that of the chair.

The fourth dimension and beyond, is actually our true home – where we come from. And in it, we exist as spirit energy. This spirit experiences life as a quantum event. Everything interconnected with everything, everywhere, at all times. This quantum state is our true reality, and everything else is a falsehood.

B: A falsehood?

A: Yes, because in our true state we are at one with all creation. Which means at one with our Creator. The Divine Source of all that Is. Whereas, in a purely five sense, three-dimensional state of existence, we do not allow ourselves access to the vibrational waves of higher awareness that constitute the true universal state of reality. The 99.5% of existence we think of as ‘beyond the realms of possibility’.

B: Is this ‘lack of connection’ the cause of our seemingly endless problems, here on Earth? Are we really living in such a tiny match box and imagining we are having a universal experience?

A: Essentially, yes. We experience most of our lives as something completely divorced from what Life actually Is. This has not come about by chance. It is a design which has been imposed upon mankind by a force whose motivation is alien to the will of the Creator, yet which vampires energy from creation. However, since we are gifted with powers that originate with our Creator, but have largely failed to apply them, we are complicit in the problem. We possess all that is needed to return life on Earth to its true state of creative resonance, but fail to do so.

We have instead, allowed ourselves to be won-round by an alien force and its accompanying false agenda: its deception. So, as we awaken to our true reality, we must use the creative, imaginative powers with which we are richly endowed, to dismiss the three-dimensional imposter. The imposer of the three-dimensional deception – that we have confused with reality. The task of mankind is to rediscover and re-establish its connection to the source of all life.

B: Are we making any progress in that direction?

A: It is called ‘waking-up’. This is an apt expression, as it suggests coming round from a state of unproductive dormancy. Universal energies, whose origins are the higher dimensions, are manifesting strongly on planet Earth at this time. The pace is quickening. The attempt to block that quickening pace and its accompanying awakening, is equally manifesting itself, increasingly obliquely.  As a result, people are experiencing a critical confluence of disparate forces. The feeling, for many, is of being pulled apart; a type of dying.

The man and woman emerging out of this storm will be closer to their true state of being. Much closer. They will understand that they embody both sides of the disparate energy mix now manifesting. The alien and the true state.

They will recognize that both the creator and the destroyer exist within, and that each individual has the power of ‘free will’ to choose which to nourish into fullness. They will discover that they are in possession – and always have been – of higher instinctual and intuitive energies. Energies which, when properly directed, make it possible to avoid returning to a repetition of past errors.

They will realize that the source of their power is not their own. Does not belong to them, but is an inherited gift, a seed, whose origins rest with their Creator. Thus, rather than puff themselves up with false pride, they will honour the source from which their divine powers emanate. The life to come, here on earth and beyond, will be uniquely directed towards building upon the fruits of this deepening recognition.

In this way God and Man will be reunited – to put it better – will rediscover their unity. Their oneness. And the quantum Universe, with open arms, will welcome back the profusion of its presently disconnected and alienated parts, and thus become whole.

At that moment, the dance of all joyous dances will manifest throughout. And the purpose of Life will be revealed.

B: Blessed be that day!

About the Author

Julian Rose is an early pioneer of UK organic farming, a writer, actor and international activist.

He is President of the International Coalition to Protect the Polish Countryside. Julian is the author of two acclaimed titles: Changing Course for Life and In Defense of Life, which can be purchased by visiting www.julianrose.info. He has just completed his third book ‘Overcoming the Mechanistic Mind’ for which he is currently seeking a publisher.

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Spirituality

Statue of Virgin Mary ‘weeping blood’ in Italy

Italians are flocking to pray to a Virgin Mary statue after a child spotted it “crying tears of blood”. The incident was reported from Paolino Arnesano Square in the small town of Carmiano, Lecce.

The “Weeping Blood” statue of the Virgin Mary in Piazza Paolino Arnesano in Carmiano, Italy, attracted crowds of religious people who came to see the miracle:

Un nuovo rivolo lacrimale, sempre dallo stesso occhio, poco fa secondo i fedeli presenti ha segnato nuovamente il volto della Madonnina in piazza Paolino Arnesano.

Gepostet von Andrea Vivi Citta am Dienstag, 4. August 2020

Carmiano is a small town in the province of Lecce, but after people learned about the miracle, the whole city first came to see it, and now many pilgrims from other cities arrived.

Riccardo Calabrese, a priest of the Church of Sant Antoni Abate, said it was unclear if the incident was “a miracle, the result of warm weather at the moment, or worst of all, someone’s joke.”

“All the time I was next to the statue, I saw a procession of people who, out of curiosity or faith, left their homes to gather there. I saw children, teenagers, adults, and elderly people meeting at our beloved Virgin Mary statue, and they all looked up at her face,” Calabrese was quoted as saying by The Sun.

The local newspaper Repubblica reported that the Bishop of Lecce announced that the church would conduct a thorough investigation of the incident.

Organizing all sorts of “miracles” is a traditional family business for priests: they constantly announce crying icons and statues, or some other miracles. Therefore, there is no trust in them – especially if, to calm the public, they declare the incident a joke or write off everything as a result of a heat wave. Now times have changed and if earlier the priests organized “miracles” to control the sheep, now they explain the miracles “scientifically” so that the flock would not worry. 

Carmiano is not just a town, but a town that has developed around a Christian commune. We do not know the details of the doctrine of this commune, but, as Wikipedia writes, the Dormition of the Most Holy Theotokos is considered a special holiday for the local community, which falls on August 15 among Catholics. And it must have coincided that just on the eve of the holiday, among the many statues, it was the statue of the Virgin Mary that wept. 

There are no such coincidences in nature and it is absolutely unambiguous about a miracle, or more precisely, we are talking about a sign, a horrible sign. 

We do not know what awaits Italy. Maybe there will be some kind of geological catastrophe, maybe Italy will again become the focus of some kind of pandemic, maybe Italy will face a war related to the current conflicts in the Mediterranean. However, the catastrophe may be of a cosmic scale. 

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Spirituality

Taj Mahal – An Amazing Love Story

The construction of the Taj Mahal (literally translated from the Persian language as “Crown of the Mughals”) was associated with the name of the beautiful woman – Arjumand Bano Begum, or Mumtaz – “Queen of the Soul”.

At 200 kilometers from the capital of India, Delhi, on the high bank of the Ganges tributary – the Jamna – is the five-domed Taj Mahal mausoleum. The white-stone structure surprises and delights with its perfect proportions, an elegant mosaic of colored precious and semiprecious stones, and skillful carving.

The Taj Mahal is a whole complex of buildings. Taj – white, and around the fortress and minarets of red sandstone. The mausoleum has absolute proportions: on the base and height – an exact square, each side of which is 75 meters. Several paths stretch to the Taj Mahal, between them there is water in the pools, first the entire mausoleum is reflected in it, and as it approaches, its individual details.

Local architects worked together with artists from Damascus, gardeners from Constantinople and Samarkand to create the Indian pearl. When creating the interior, interior decoration of the mausoleum, the craftsmen used the best varieties of white, occasionally yellow and black marble, mother of pearl, jasper, agate, emeralds, aquamarines, pearls and hundreds of other stones.

QUEEN OF THE SOUL

Arjumand Bano Begum was only 19 years old when she became the second wife of Prince Guram (future Shah-Jahan). And although the prince had several more wives and many concubines, Mumtaz won the heart of her husband and undividedly owned him until the end of his days. It was an unusually romantic and poetic love. Mumtaz was not only his most beloved wife, but his most faithful companion since the turbulent times when Prince Guram wandered around the world, pursued by his father Jahangir, when he obtained his throne in a fierce struggle with his brothers. In 1627, Guram, having gained a final victory over them and seized his father’s throne, assumed the title of emperor, Shah-Jahan – “ruler of the world”. Mumtaz finally became the queen of India.

Shah Jahan adored his wife and each time he honored her, held lavish receptions and grandiose celebrations in her honor, without her any important ceremony would begin, and not a single state act would be adopted. Mumtaz was present at the meetings of the State Council; her opinion was almost never disputed by anyone.

The portrait of the queen, painted by her contemporary, has been preserved. Violating one of the strictest prohibitions of Islam – to draw portraits of animals and people, an unknown artist skillfully conveyed the beauty of Mumtaz, a white-faced Persian, a pearl of the East.

A happy life together ended abruptly. In the spring of 1636, Mumtaz suddenly fell ill: before dying, she turned to her husband with a request to take care of their eldest daughter, Jahanara Begum, and took an oath from him – to build a tomb worthy of their love, their joint nineteen-year-old married life. Mumtaz’s death shocked Jahan.

WHITE AND BLACK PALACES

Widowed, he commanded the construction of an unprecedentedly beautiful mausoleum. Shah was presented with many different projects, the authors of which were the best of the best architects of the East. Of these, he chose a project created by Indian architect Ystad Khan Effendi. Following this, a twenty-thousand army of builders was driven into Agra: masons, marble cutters, jewelers and handymen. Marble was brought from Makran near Jaipur, sandstone from Sikri, gems from India, Afghanistan, Persia and Central Asia.

The entire complex of the mausoleum was created over twenty two years. Having fulfilled the mandate of “the queen of her soul”, Jahan proceeded to a new, no less grandiose construction – exactly the same mausoleum, but only of black marble, for himself – on the other (left) bank of the Jamna River. According to the Shah’s plan, both mausoleums, like marital chambers, were to be connected by a high lace bridge of black and white marble. Preparatory work has already begun, but this plan, unfortunately, was not destined to come true.

While Shah Jahan was building a new tomb, his sons fought among themselves. Having defeated the brothers, one of them – Aurangzeb – seized power in 1658, killed the brothers, arrested his father and imprisoned him in the Red Fort under reliable guard along with his beloved daughter Jahanara Begum. Shah Jahan spent the last years of his life in the marble palace that he had once built for Mumtaz, from where he could constantly see the Taj Mahal. Here he died on January 23, 1666. Fulfilling the last will of his father, Aurangzeb the next day ordered his body to be transported to the Taj Mahal and to be buried next to Mumtaz without any ceremony or honor.

UNSOLVED SECRET

The Taj Mahal mausoleum stands alone in its inexpressible beauty on the banks of the blue Jamna, reflecting its clean, proud appearance. He appears as a vision from another, better, cleaner world. “The Taj Mahal has a secret that everyone feels, but no one can interpret.”

“The Taj Mahal attracts you like a magnet. You can stand for hours and all look and look at this marvel, at this fabulous ghost, ascending into a bottomless azure sky. The illumination of the Taj Mahal changes like a mirage. It glows from the inside, changing hues depending on the position of the sun: it suddenly turns light pink, then bluish, then pale orange. At night, under the moon, against a black sky, it looks dazzling white. Just coming very close, you notice that he is covered in the finest patterns woven over white marble, the marble blocks are encrusted with gems and seem to shine through, emitting a flickering light.”

The dazzling white walls of the mausoleum are covered with mosaics – garlands of flowers made of precious stones. Branches of white jasmine from mother-of-pearl shimmer with red pomegranate flower from carnelian and delicate tendrils of grapevine and honeysuckle, and delicate oleanders peek out from the lush green foliage. Each leaf, each petal is a separate emerald, yacht, pearl or topaz; sometimes there are up to one hundred of such stones for one branch of flowers, and there are hundreds of similar ones on the panels and grids of the Taj Mahal!

DEATH NOT SHARED

In the central hall of the mausoleum are two sarcophagi sculpted from white-pink rocks of marble, decorated with floral ornaments. These are the cenotaphs of the dead, symbolic projections of those who are in the lowest part of the mausoleum. There, in the underground vaulted room, dusk reigns. Both tombs with the remains of the royal spouses, Mumtaz and Jahan, like a screen, are surrounded by a white marble carved fence about two meters high, decorated with fabulous flowers – red, yellow, blue, along with green garlands, interlacing of marble leaves and flowers.

What is the power of the impression made by the Taj Mahal? Where does the insurmountable impact on everyone who sees it come from?

“Neither marble lace, nor the thin carving covering its walls, nor mosaic flowers, nor the fate of the beautiful queen — none of this alone could make such an impression. There must be a reason for something else. However, something in the Taj Mahal fascinated me and thrilled me. … It seemed to me that the mystery of the Taj Mahal is connected with the secret of death, i.e. with that secret, regarding which, in the words of one of the Upanishads, “even the gods were at first in doubt.” Above the tomb, where the queen’s body lies, a light burns. I felt that this is where the beginning of the clue lies. For the light shimmering over the tomb, where its dust lies, this light … is a small transient earthly life. And the Taj Mahal is a future eternal life.”

PLACE OF PILGRIMAGE

The creation of the Taj Mahal dates back to the time of the conquest of India by Muslims. The grandson of padishah Akbar Jahan was one of those conquerors who changed the face of a vast country. A warrior and statesman, Jahan was at the same time a fine connoisseur of art and philosophy; his courtyard in Agra attracted the most prominent scientists and artists of Persia, which at that time was the center of culture throughout West Asia.

The son of Jahan Aurangzeb (“the beauty of the throne,” 1665-1706) was nothing like his father. He was a stern, withdrawn and ascetic-religious monarch. While still a prince, he disapproved of the useless and devastating, as he believed, activities of his father. Aurangzeb spent his entire long and hectic life in military campaigns aimed at maintaining power over the empire.

Aurangzeb raised a rebellion against his father, accusing him of spending all the state revenue on the mausoleum. He imprisoned the former lord in an underground mosque in one of the inner palaces of the Agra fortress. Shah Jahan lived in this underground mosque for seven years; sensing the approach of death, he asked him to be transferred to the so-called Jasmine pavilion in the fortress wall, to the tower of lace marble, where was the favorite room of Queen Arjumand Bano. There, on the balcony of the Jasmine Pavilion overlooking the Jamna, from where the Taj Mahal was visible at a distance, Shah Jahan died.

This is the brief history of the Taj Mahal. Since then, the mausoleum of Queen Mumtaz has gone through many vicissitudes. During the wars that continued in India in the 17th and 18th centuries, Agra repeatedly passed from hand to hand and was often plundered. The conquerors removed the large silver doors from the Taj Mahal, carried out precious lamps and candlesticks, and tore ornaments from precious stones from the walls. However, the building itself and most of the decoration remained intact. The Taj Mahal is now restored and carefully guarded.

But today, the Taj Mahal is partially dressed in scaffolding due to the fact that cracks appeared on the walls. The marble Taj Mahal weighs many hundreds of thousands of tons. A huge mass presses on the soil, and it gradually settles. Over the past centuries, as a result of soil displacement, the mausoleum leaned toward the river, although it is invisible with a simple eye. Once the high-water Jamna came close to the building, but then the river became shallow and receded. This last circumstance changed the structure of the soil and also affected the stability of the mausoleum. Now it is decided to plant trees on the banks of the Jamna in order to stop soil erosion.

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Spirituality

Image of the Antichrist on a 14th-century fresco – who painted it and why?

The Antichrist, unlike Christ, the Son of God, is not the son of Satan, but a simple man. In Christian ideology, the Antichrist will appear shortly before the end of the world. Antichrist will be descended from Dan. This is one of the so-called 12 Tribes of Israel – the descendants of the sons of Jacob, who formed the Israeli people.

Antichrist will become an authoritative ruler of people, will arrange persecution of the righteous. This period in the Revelation of John the Theologian is called the Great Tribulation.

There was no specifics in the Bible about the Antichrist, so all further assumptions are futurism based on treatises of symbols and various interpretations. In particular, Calvinist Anthony Hoekema in his book “The Bible and the Future” believes that up to 75% of people will die during the Great Tribulation and this period will last for seven years.

And then, all Christians are united in this, there will be the Second Coming of Jesus Christ and the Last Judgment. When all sinners – both living and dead – will get what they deserve, the righteous will receive eternal paradise.

Christians were afraid of the Antichrist, so he was like Voldemort in Harry Potter – the one whose name cannot be called. Well, to portray him was generally forbidden.

The first image of the Antichrist appeared already in the XIV century. And its bold author – Vitale da Bologna – lived a transitional period from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance. It was during this period that it became possible to show freedom of creativity.

In northern Italy there is the Pomposa Monastery, which in the 9th century was founded by Benedictine monks. Over time, the monastery turned into a party place for people of art. The walls in the cathedral of this monastery were painted by Vitale da Bologna.


Even closer to the wall … Look at the bottom right … Take a closer look.


Here is the image of the Antichrist on the wall from an old Italian mural of the 14th century. 


Frescoes in the Cathedral of Pomposa, the image of the Antichrist is highlighted in red

Here lived the famous medieval musician Guido d’Arezzo. He reformed musical notation, prescribed a new scheme for the designation of keys and intervals. It’s d’Arezzo that we owe modern letter designations in music, for example C sharp major.

The famous Petr Damiani, a poet, philosopher and theologian, worked a lot in the monastery. Despite the fact that all art was saturated with Christianity (the culture of scholasticism of the Middle Ages!), creativity found its way. People tried to realize bold ideas for their time.

As often happens, where there is art and creativity, freedom of morals arises there. After all, art must be true. Art must find paradoxes in our reality, notice inconsistencies and vividly declare them! But art in the service of the state, in the strict framework of those in power, is already PR propaganda.

But back to our hero. He really wanted to add brightness to his religious canvases and he was drawn to ominous plots. After all, there you can truly imagine the whole storm of emotions!

The monks ordered the painting “The Last Judgment” from him. And Vitale da Bologna painted the walls of the cathedral at the request of the customer, and on the pretext of realism added the Antichrist there. And so this first image of the chief man who was in the service of Satan appeared.

However, customers demanded to depict it as disgusting as possible. The image of the Antichrist turned out to be some kind of fictional, phantasmagoric – more reminiscent of the devil from fairy tales. But the antichrist, as we recall, is a man!

Attempts to portray the Antichrist were made in the future, but these were more episodes. So, for example, the Antichrist was seen by another Renaissance artist Luca Signorelli.

Luca Signorelli. Fragment of the painting “The Sermon and Works of the Antichrist”, 1500

Here, the Antichrist looks like Christ, only with an ominous expression. And Satan whispers his thoughts, who looks like an ordinary petty demon.

And it is this picture of Signorelli, in our opinion, which better illustrates the real image of the Antichrist. He is an ordinary person. Which, most likely, will consider that it is doing the right thing and for the good of mankind. After all, logic is a double-edged weapon, it is always ready to justify any crime with great reasonable goals.

14th century fresco called “The Funeral of Satan”

In the Middle Ages, striped clothing was treated extremely negatively, there was even a case when a shoemaker was sentenced to death for wearing striped clothing. It happened in 1310 in the French city of Rouen. In those days, striped clothing was considered devilish.

Among the many excellent medieval frescoes in the Verona Cathedral, there is one especially curious. It is called “The Funeral of Satan” and depicts an enemy of the human race lying under a striped veil on his deathbed. Actually, it is the color of the veil and the appearance of Satan that attracts attention.

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