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8 Detox Water Recipes to Flush Your Liver

by Bembu

Drinking water all by itself is a way to help flush the body of toxins on a daily basis, but with a few simple ingredients you can transform water into detox water and get even more benefit from it. This is something you can do each day, or as part of a more broad detoxing strategy. Each one of the ingredients listed here will provide slightly different benefits, so be sure to choose it according to the particular goal you have..

Apple Cinnamon Detox Water (as seen on Dr. Oz)

This is also referred to as the Zero Calorie detox water because it contains nearly zero calories. There are calories from the apple, but they’re pretty negligible. You’re probably used to seeing the zero on a bottle of water when it comes all the categories on the Nutrition Information label, like calories, fat, and sodium, and this would clock in pretty close. The cinnamon it contains is going to help stimulate your internal organs to cleanse themselves, while the apple is providing you with its all natural source of vitamins and minerals. Way better than just drinking regular water and a helpful boost to any detox program.

Cucumber Lemon Mint Detox Water (aka Sassy Water)

Cucumbers are one of the most hydrating vegetables because they’re mostly made up of water. Many detox programs include cucumbers on them for this very reason, and adding them to your water pulls out their minerals so you’re getting an added benefit. Mix in the lemon juice and you’re getting the cleansing effect of citric acid and helping to clear out the digestive system. The mint makes things taste fresh and crisp, and goes nicely with the lemon and cucumber while providing additional nutrients and benefits.

Jillian Michaels Detox Water

You are probably familiar with Jillian Michaels if you’ve ever seen an episode of The Biggest Loser. She also promotes her own line of workout programs and diet books. Here she’s endorsed a particular detox water recipe that uses cranberry juice, lemon juice, and dandelion tea all mixed together with a lot of water. The end result is that it’s also supposed to also help you lose weight. This can really be said for anything that has a detoxifying effect, since getting back to our more natural and clean state will have the byproduct of weight loss if we’ve moved toward a heavier state.

Strawberry Detox Water

Strawberries are a great way to add a familiar and preferred flavor to most anything, and in this case it can make your water taste better while also providing antioxidants and added vitamins and minerals to your body. This particular recipe includes watermelon and rosemary as well. This makes it a great detox recipe to use in the summer when it’s easier to build up a sweat, and it’s only natural to have the taste of strawberries and watermelon. It will help to make your detoxing efforts more enjoyable and seem like less of a chore.

Simple Detox Water

The simple, the better right? Let’s keep things simple and go with this quick way to make your water more healthy for you. This would be used as part of a plan to detox the body a little bit each day. It’s recommending that you take the juice from half a lemon and squeeze it into the water you drink when first waking up. This is a time when you’re most dehydrated and making sure that you get rehydrated on the double is vital. The lemon juice helps to get your digestive system going and prepares it for its daily duties to come.

Apple Cider Vinegar Detox Water

Apple cider vinegar is a handy detoxing aid and it’s good to keep a bottle of it in the cupboard. You can instantly improve the quality of a glass of water by adding a bit of ACV to it, but in this case they’re showing you how to make a detoxifying drink from it. They’re also including lemons, cucumbers, and mint, a popular combination you’ve seen elsewhere on our list, but the use of apple cider vinegar gives it additional properties and benefits that you won’t want to miss, and that will only amplify the detoxing process.

Lemon and Cayenne Pepper Detox (Master Cleanse)

The most important part of the Master Cleanse is where you stop eating regular foods and rely only on a concoction made of organic lemon juice, maple syrup, and cayenne pepper. This is supposed to spur the body into detox mode, with the lack of food helping to give the digestive system a break and make sure that you’re entirely cleared out. We’ve gone into detail about what you need to do in order to complete the Master Cleanse, so if you do decide on it be sure to check our guide for the best chance of success.

Weight Loss Detox Water (Fat Flush Water)

This is a great detox water for weight loss, and is specifically geared at getting certain fruits into your body that you otherwise might not eat. They’re using grapefruit here, one of the quintessential weight loss foods that seems to always get brought up when asked which foods help to lose the most weight. Grapefruit also is a fantastic detoxing food, which is often overlooked. They use tangerines for more citrus and sweetness, and cucumbers for added minerals.

 

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Planet Earth

Losing Biodiversity Could Lead to “Extinction Cascades”

New research shows that a loss of biodiversity puts the entire ecosystem at risk of a domino effect, where a single extinction could cause countless others.

Domino Effect

Human expansion, destruction of natural habitats, pollution, and climate change have all led to biodiversity levels that are considered below the “safe” threshold for global ecosystems. And the consequences of biodiversity loss aren’t just about the extinction of certain charismatic species.

A new study published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that less biodiversity in an area increases the risk of a domino effect of extinctions, where one species’ disappearance can cause other species to follow suit.

The research, conducted by ecologists at the University of Exeter, shows that losing a species in an area is dangerous in that it makes the surrounding ecological community simpler, and therefore less robust to change.

It makes sense: the fewer species that exist in an area, the fewer that are available to “fill the gap” left by other extinctions. Other species in the ecosystem will have fewer alternatives to turn to. For example, if there are fewer insects left overall across a region, the bats and amphibians that eat them will feel the loss of just one species much more severely.

“Interactions between species are important for ecosystem stability,” said Dirk Sanders, lead author and professor in Exeter’s Center for Ecology and Conservation, in a news release. “And because species are interconnected through multiple interactions, an impact on one species can affect others as well.”

The Exeter team investigated this idea by removing a species of wasp from test ecosystems. In many of these systems, the wasp’s disappearance caused indirect extinctions of other species at the same level of the food web. In simple communities, the effect was even stronger. Sanders emphasized the biodiversity loss could cause “run-away extinction cascades.”

This research sounds yet another dire warning bell at a time of biodiversity crisis. Even if you don’t care for poster-child species like polar bears, the crisis could also have ramifications for species that everyone cares about, like the crops that are the foundation of our global food supply. Studies that show how broadly single extinctions reverberate across ecosystems might buoy further efforts to protect global biodiversity.

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Microwaves Might Have Same Negative Affects on Environment as Cars, Suggests Research

Microwaves usage across the EU alone emits as much carbon dioxide as nearly seven million cars according to a new study by The University of Manchester.

Researchers at the University have carried out the first ever comprehensive study of the environmental impacts of microwaves, considering their whole life cycle, from ‘cradle to grave’.

The study found:

  • Microwaves emit 7.7 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent per year in the EU. This is equivalent to the annual emissions of 6.8 million cars.
  • Microwaves across the EU consume an estimated 9.4 terawatt hours (TWh) of electricity every year. This is equivalent to the annual electricity generated by three large gas power plants.
  • Efforts to reduce consumption should focus on improving consumer awareness and behaviour to use appliances more efficiently.

Microwaves account for the largest percentage of sales of all type of ovens in the European Union (EU), with numbers set to reach nearly 135 million by 2020. Despite this, the scale of their impacts on the environment was not known until now.

The study used life cycle assessment (LCA) to estimate the impacts of microwaves, taking into account their manufacture, use and end-of-life waste management. Altogether, the research team investigated 12 different environmental factors, including climate change, depletion of natural resources and ecological toxicity. They found, for example, that the microwaves used across the EU emit 7.7 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent per year. This is equivalent to the annual emission of 6.8 million cars.

The research shows that the main environmental ‘hotspots’ are materials used to manufacture the microwaves, the manufacturing process and end-of-life waste management. For example, the manufacturing process alone contributes more than 20% to depletion of natural resources and to climate change.

However, it is electricity consumption by microwaves that has the biggest impact on the environment, taking into account its whole life cycle, from production of fuels to generation of electricity. In total, microwaves across the EU consume an estimated 9.4 terawatts per hour (TWh) of electricity every year. This is equivalent to the annual electricity generation by three large gas power plants.

The study found that, on average, an individual microwave uses 573 kilowatt hour (kWh) of electricity over its lifetime of eight years. That is equivalent to the electricity consumed by a 7 watt LED light bulb, left on continuously for almost nine years. This is despite the fact that microwaves spend more than 90% of their lifetime being idle, in the stand-by mode.

The study’s authors suggest that efforts to reduce consumption should focus on improving consumer awareness and behaviour to use appliances more efficiently. For example, electricity consumption by microwaves can be reduced by adjusting the time of cooking to the type of food.

Waste is another major problem. Due to their relative low cost and ease of manufacture, consumers are throwing more electrical and electronic (EE) equipment away than ever before, including microwaves.

In 2005, across the EU, 184,000 tonnes of EE waste was generated from discarded microwaves. By 2025 this is estimated to rise to 195,000 tonnes, or 16 million individual units being sent for disposal.

Dr Alejandro Gallego-Schmid, from the School of Chemical Engineering & Analytical Science, explains: ‘Rapid technological developments and falling prices are driving the purchase of electrical and electronic appliances in Europe.

‘Consumers now tend to buy new appliances before the existing ones reach the end of their useful life as electronic goods have become fashionable and ‘status’ items.

‘As a result, discarded electrical equipment, such as microwaves, is one of the fastest growing waste streams worldwide.’

Another major contributing factor to the waste is a reduced lifespan of microwaves. It is now nearly seven years shorter than it was almost 20 years ago. Research shows that a microwave’s life cycle has decreased from around 10 to 15 years in the late 90s to between six to eight years today.

Dr Gallego-Schmid added: ‘Given that microwaves account for the largest percentage of sales of all type of ovens in the EU, it is increasingly important to start addressing their impact on resource use and end-of-life waste.’

The study also shows that existing regulation will not be sufficient to reduce the environmental impacts of microwaves. It recommends that it will be necessary to develop specific regulations for these devices targeting their design. This will help to reduce the amount of resources used to make microwaves and waste generated at the end of their lifetime.

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Planet Earth

Asteroid That Killed Off The Dinosaurs Also Triggered Huge Volcanoes Under The Oceans

When an asteroid hit Earth some 66 million years ago, it triggered devastation around the world.

There were at least three nearly simultaneous events involved in the global catastrophe that ended what we now call the Mesozoic era.

An asteroid between 10 and 15 kilometres in diameter slammed into Earth, creating the Chicxulub Crater near Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula.

The Deccan Traps, a massive volcanic province in what’s now India, erupted, spewing lava and smoke that filled the skies.

And 75 percent of Earth’s plant and animal life went extinct, which scientists have linked to those other disasters that filled the skies with soot and smoke and transformed the world’s climate.

But when it comes to world-shaking devastation, that wasn’t all that was going on at the time, scientists report in a study recently published in the journal Science Advances.

The asteroid also appears to have sent ripples through Earth’s tectonic plates, which spread out through the oceans and caused tens of thousands of miles of underwater volcanic ridges to spew magma.

The authors describe those eruptions as “on par with the largest eruptive events in Earth’s 4.5-billion-year history, including the Deccan Traps”.

Looking for past volcanic activity

Part of the debate about what really killed the dinosaurs has to do with the interplay between the asteroid impact and the Deccan Traps eruptions. The most up-to-date understanding suggests the Deccan Traps eruptions began before the Chicxulub impact.

But they also seem to have gotten much more active in the time after the asteroid hit.

Yet if the asteroid was able to influence volcanic activity on the other side of the globe, it should have affected volcanoes elsewhere, too. That’s why the authors of this study decided to trace what was happening in the oceans.

To uncover evidence of underwater volcanic activity, the researchers used existing data to examine how the seafloor’s structure changed over the past 100 million years.

They were able to find evidence of massive transformations in the amount of rock on the seafloor, a change caused by volcanic activity.

Eruptions left 650-foot-high piles of rock in the Indian and Pacific oceans, the study authors write in The Conversation. They dated those eruptions to within a million years of the impact, close enough to link the events.

A better picture of the dinosaur apocalypse

These new findings give us a better timeline of what happened to trigger the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event.

Although the Deccan Traps were probably erupting for 250,000 years before the Chicxulub asteroid slammed into the planet, the impact transformed the world.

The atmosphere filled with soot, causing global cooling that was strong and sudden enough to have played a strong role in the end of the dinosaurs.

At the same time, the asteroid shook the world and led to earthquakes that released even more magma.

The already flowing Deccan Traps erupted in a whole new way, essentially covering the Indian subcontinent with lava and further filling the skies with particles that reflected the sun’s heat back into space and cooled the planet.

An eruption that was equally strong occurred underwater.

Small mammals and flying dinosaurs – which we now know as birds – survived, but the majority of plant and animal life did not.

We still don’t know exactly which components of these global catastrophes were most responsible for the extinctions, or whether other volcanic systems elsewhere in the world were triggered, too.

“What is clear is that this new research points to global-scale connections between catastrophes, a good reminder that events happening on the other side of the planet can have effects felt everywhere,” the study authors write.

What is very clear is that this was an unpleasant time to be anywhere on Earth.

This article was originally published by Business Insider.

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