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How Plants Help Each Other Grow By Near-Telepathic Communication

12 May 2013 by The Elf in Planet Earth

“Plants substitute biosynthesis for behavior”, employing biochemical messaging as a means of interacting with their environment on a level we don’t even fully understand, yet we are constantly immersed in this sea of molecular communication.. Its been hypothesized that plant psychedelics are messenger molecules to mammals that naturally raise awareness at critical junctures in order to impart information vital to maintaining the continuity of the all life in biosphere…But how do plants communicate with each other besides the thick matrix of pheromonal activity?

Via Waking Times:

Plants have scientifically been show to draw alternative sources of energy from other plants. Plants influence each other in many ways and they communicate through “nanomechanical oscillations” vibrations on the tiniest atomic or molecular scale or as close as you can get to telepathic communication.

Members of Professor Dr. Olaf Kruse’s biological research team have previously shown that green algae not only engages in photosynthesis, but also has an alternative source of energy: it can draw it from other plants. His research findings were released in the online journal Nature Communications.

Other research published last year, showed that young corn roots made clicking sounds, and that when suspended in water they would lean towards sounds made in the same frequency range (about 220 Hz). So it seemed that plants do emit and react to sound, and the researchers wanted to delve into this idea further.

Working with chili plants in their most recent study, specifically Capsicum annuum, they first grew chili seeds on their own and then in the presence of other chili plants, basil and fennel, and recorded their rates of germination and growth. Fennel is considered an aggressive plant that hinders the germination of other plants around it, while basil is generally considered to be a beneficial plant for gardening and an ideal companion for chili plants.

Germination rates were fairly low when the seeds were grown on their own, lower when grown in the presence of fennel (as expected). Germination rates were better with other chili plants around, and even better with basil.

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The Elf